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Author Topic: Covid Vaccinations  (Read 110019 times)
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Lady Liebe

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« Reply #30 on: December 13, 2020, 04:22:58 PM »

Which celebrity should be the face of the COVID-19 vaccine?

https://www.theverge.com/...-elvis-oprah-dolly-parton

Guess who's first on the list . . .  Queen Elizabeth. I also think she's had the shot already.

I never knew there was resistance to the Polio vaccine.

Some of their other picks are spot on.
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« Reply #31 on: December 13, 2020, 06:38:25 PM »

Is someone with medical knowledge able to tell us if the vaccine will prevent us from getting COVID or will the vaccine help with not getting COVID as bad as is the potential? I had COVID at the end of July (mild case).  Once the vaccine is available for me I will probably get it.  I just haven't heard anyone state if it's an immunity to COVID or just helps with not getting it as bad. 
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Lady Liebe

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« Reply #32 on: December 13, 2020, 07:26:51 PM »

Is someone with medical knowledge able to tell us if the vaccine will prevent us from getting COVID or will the vaccine help with not getting COVID as bad as is the potential? I had COVID at the end of July (mild case).  Once the vaccine is available for me I will probably get it.  I just haven't heard anyone state if it's an immunity to COVID or just helps with not getting it as bad.  

No medical knowledge but -

A friend who is a retired nurse told me the vaccine would help with not getting a more severe case of Covid. She likened it to a flu vaccination. This was also repeated by a Doctor on the local news yesterday morning.
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« Reply #33 on: December 13, 2020, 07:46:05 PM »

The aim is to prevent an infection. HOwever just like with most other viruses, Covid 19 will mutate. Most vaccinations that promise a lifelong immunity are against bacteria.
Basically I presume the vaccine will be rather like a flu-vaccination: you will have to get a new shot every so often, and the current vaccine is matched to a known virus, meaning that once the virus has mutated (as flu virus does almost every year) your immune system (depending on the scale of mutation) is either out cold or can handle it better.

In your case, Hrhpita, if you have gone thru the infection already, it would be better to wait for the next stage, the next mutation and then get the vaccine, as you should have some immunity against this current strain, at least not less than with a vaccination.
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« Reply #34 on: December 13, 2020, 08:06:06 PM »

I suppose will be the one not getting it.... I hope it won't be mandate at my work,if so I will resign. My reason, it's very rashed and the long term side effects are not known .
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« Reply #35 on: December 13, 2020, 08:11:39 PM »

They don't expect a new vaccine for this every time - flu viruses mutate much, much faster than coronaviruses do. I don't think any virologists or immunologists expect mutations on the level of being unable to use this vaccine. It is an endemic virus already, we have to just live with it like we do flu.
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luvcharles

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« Reply #36 on: December 14, 2020, 01:06:06 AM »

This vaccine is not rushed. Many people don't understand the normal process and assume that over the five or so years there is constant testing when in fact there is the same amount of testing as has been done with this vaccine. The time difference is the bureaucratic workings between phasing and the necessity to fundraise for the next phase.

Normal vaccine development once human tests begin:

1. Phase 1 - about six weeks and about 20-30 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for next phase. Meanwhile raise money to conduct phase two.

2. Phase 2 - about 2 months and about 100 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for next phase. Meanwhile raise money to conduct phase three.

3. Phase 3 - about 3 months and about 20,000 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for vaccine to be rolled out.

What has happened this time is that the WAIT time has been cut to literally days via two means - the UK's ongoing assessment of the data in real time so they could see what was happening daily and highlight issues immediately rather than after the report was written and before approval could be given for the next phase; and the IMMEDIATE reviewing of the report with immediate approval for the next phase, unless there was an issue that needed further information at that point AND the funding already being available.

The length of the tests at each phase and the number of test subjects has been the same as normal. It has been the waiting time between phases when reports will sit on a desk waiting for someone to get around to reading and assessing the data that has been speeded up.

My cousin has been working on the Oxford vaccine and he has said that having real time feedback has been great as they have been able to change test parameters as they go rather than waiting until the tests are over and then being told to get a group of xxxx and test them before approval of the next phase. Also knowing that the funding was already there has taken a weight of their minds as they haven't had to go cap in hand to people to raise money after each phase.

This is not a rushed vaccine but one where the waiting time between phases has been cut - the red tape has been cut but the actual processes have been as vigorous as they are with all vaccines.
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #37 on: December 14, 2020, 03:31:21 AM »

This vaccine is not rushed. Many people don't understand the normal process and assume that over the five or so years there is constant testing when in fact there is the same amount of testing as has been done with this vaccine. The time difference is the bureaucratic workings between phasing and the necessity to fundraise for the next phase.

Normal vaccine development once human tests begin:

1. Phase 1 - about six weeks and about 20-30 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for next phase. Meanwhile raise money to conduct phase two.

2. Phase 2 - about 2 months and about 100 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for next phase. Meanwhile raise money to conduct phase three.

3. Phase 3 - about 3 months and about 20,000 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for vaccine to be rolled out.

What has happened this time is that the WAIT time has been cut to literally days via two means - the UK's ongoing assessment of the data in real time so they could see what was happening daily and highlight issues immediately rather than after the report was written and before approval could be given for the next phase; and the IMMEDIATE reviewing of the report with immediate approval for the next phase, unless there was an issue that needed further information at that point AND the funding already being available.

The length of the tests at each phase and the number of test subjects has been the same as normal. It has been the waiting time between phases when reports will sit on a desk waiting for someone to get around to reading and assessing the data that has been speeded up.

My cousin has been working on the Oxford vaccine and he has said that having real time feedback has been great as they have been able to change test parameters as they go rather than waiting until the tests are over and then being told to get a group of xxxx and test them before approval of the next phase. Also knowing that the funding was already there has taken a weight of their minds as they haven't had to go cap in hand to people to raise money after each phase.

This is not a rushed vaccine but one where the waiting time between phases has been cut - the red tape has been cut but the actual processes have been as vigorous as they are with all vaccines.

Thanks luvcharles. My physician stepdaughter said basically the same thing.
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Lady Liebe

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« Reply #38 on: December 14, 2020, 04:38:42 AM »

This vaccine is not rushed. Many people don't understand the normal process and assume that over the five or so years there is constant testing when in fact there is the same amount of testing as has been done with this vaccine. The time difference is the bureaucratic workings between phasing and the necessity to fundraise for the next phase.

Normal vaccine development once human tests begin:

1. Phase 1 - about six weeks and about 20-30 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for next phase. Meanwhile raise money to conduct phase two.

2. Phase 2 - about 2 months and about 100 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for next phase. Meanwhile raise money to conduct phase three.

3. Phase 3 - about 3 months and about 20,000 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for vaccine to be rolled out.

What has happened this time is that the WAIT time has been cut to literally days via two means - the UK's ongoing assessment of the data in real time so they could see what was happening daily and highlight issues immediately rather than after the report was written and before approval could be given for the next phase; and the IMMEDIATE reviewing of the report with immediate approval for the next phase, unless there was an issue that needed further information at that point AND the funding already being available.

The length of the tests at each phase and the number of test subjects has been the same as normal. It has been the waiting time between phases when reports will sit on a desk waiting for someone to get around to reading and assessing the data that has been speeded up.

My cousin has been working on the Oxford vaccine and he has said that having real time feedback has been great as they have been able to change test parameters as they go rather than waiting until the tests are over and then being told to get a group of xxxx and test them before approval of the next phase. Also knowing that the funding was already there has taken a weight of their minds as they haven't had to go cap in hand to people to raise money after each phase.

This is not a rushed vaccine but one where the waiting time between phases has been cut - the red tape has been cut but the actual processes have been as vigorous as they are with all vaccines.

Thanks luvcharles. My physician stepdaughter said basically the same thing.

Adding my thanks too, luvcharles.

Also, when talking about how the vaccine may have to be administered again sometime, think of it this way - the shingles vaccine is suggested at age 50 and again at age 60. When preparing for trip a few years ago we had to update some of our travel vaccines because they had originally been given over 10 years before. So it's not unexpected that we will have to update our Covid vaccination at some point in the future.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2020, 05:10:53 AM by Lady Liebe » Logged

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« Reply #39 on: December 14, 2020, 06:16:18 AM »

My husband and I spoke extensively about the disease and the vaccine.  My incredibly healthy young nephew with Zero risk factors or potential exposure was infected in March.  He is a long hauler who has recently been diagnosed with pericarditis as a result of COVID.

We decided early on that if either of us became ill, we would not go to the hospital.  Neither of us wants to die without the other, to be separated when we need each other the most.  We married later in life and having waited a lifetime to find each other, we are not going to be apart when either or both of us leave.

As to the vaccine, we will take it as early as we can.  We are not priority; we are not healthcare or essential workers, and we arenít the FUCKING WHITE HOUSE STAFF who are getting it before anyone.  At such time as the German government and/or the South Korean government - whose testing protocols are the most free of influence - approve a vaccine, we get that vaccine.

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« Reply #40 on: December 14, 2020, 06:18:23 AM »

Curtains Hug
I wanted to thank you too, luvcharles. That's instinctively what I thought but it's good to have it spelled out.
My daughter gets the vaccine next week voluntarily, not being made or encouraged to. I'm glad, it worries me how much exposure she gets.
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« Reply #41 on: December 14, 2020, 06:59:34 AM »

This vaccine is not rushed. Many people don't understand the normal process and assume that over the five or so years there is constant testing when in fact there is the same amount of testing as has been done with this vaccine. The time difference is the bureaucratic workings between phasing and the necessity to fundraise for the next phase.

Normal vaccine development once human tests begin:

1. Phase 1 - about six weeks and about 20-30 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for next phase. Meanwhile raise money to conduct phase two.

2. Phase 2 - about 2 months and about 100 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for next phase. Meanwhile raise money to conduct phase three.

3. Phase 3 - about 3 months and about 20,000 test subjects. Write a report. Submit report on the data from those test subjects. Send to the approving authority. WAIT anywhere from weeks to years for approval for vaccine to be rolled out.

What has happened this time is that the WAIT time has been cut to literally days via two means - the UK's ongoing assessment of the data in real time so they could see what was happening daily and highlight issues immediately rather than after the report was written and before approval could be given for the next phase; and the IMMEDIATE reviewing of the report with immediate approval for the next phase, unless there was an issue that needed further information at that point AND the funding already being available.

The length of the tests at each phase and the number of test subjects has been the same as normal. It has been the waiting time between phases when reports will sit on a desk waiting for someone to get around to reading and assessing the data that has been speeded up.

My cousin has been working on the Oxford vaccine and he has said that having real time feedback has been great as they have been able to change test parameters as they go rather than waiting until the tests are over and then being told to get a group of xxxx and test them before approval of the next phase. Also knowing that the funding was already there has taken a weight of their minds as they haven't had to go cap in hand to people to raise money after each phase.

This is not a rushed vaccine but one where the waiting time between phases has been cut - the red tape has been cut but the actual processes have been as vigorous as they are with all vaccines.

luvcharles, I presume the feedback from you cousin  is for the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine. Did he perhaps say anything about the Pfizer or Modena mRNA vaccines?
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luvcharles

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« Reply #42 on: December 14, 2020, 07:11:57 AM »

He hasn't said anything about them other than that the same process is being followed for all the vaccines that are of interest for the UK in that the UK is doing real time evaluations of the data. He has said that all countries are cutting the red tape to get the vaccines out faster but no one is cutting the testing time (certainly not in Europe).
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« Reply #43 on: December 14, 2020, 07:16:58 AM »

He hasn't said anything about them other than that the same process is being followed for all the vaccines that are of interest for the UK in that the UK is doing real time evaluations of the data. He has said that all countries are cutting the red tape to get the vaccines out faster but no one is cutting the testing time (certainly not in Europe).
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« Reply #44 on: December 14, 2020, 07:33:44 AM »

My husband and I spoke extensively about the disease and the vaccine.  My incredibly healthy young nephew with Zero risk factors or potential exposure was infected in March.  He is a long hauler who has recently been diagnosed with pericarditis as a result of COVID.

We decided early on that if either of us became ill, we would not go to the hospital.  Neither of us wants to die without the other, to be separated when we need each other the most.  We married later in life and having waited a lifetime to find each other, we are not going to be apart when either or both of us leave.

As to the vaccine, we will take it as early as we can.  We are not priority; we are not healthcare or essential workers, and we arenít the FUCKING WHITE HOUSE STAFF who are getting it before anyone.  At such time as the German government and/or the South Korean government - whose testing protocols are the most free of influence - approve a vaccine, we get that vaccine.
Quote
https://www.msn.com/en-xl...izer-vaccines/ar-BB1bU3rL
White House staff to receive early Pfizer vaccines
The officials said some White House staffers are expected to be given the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine this week.
But on Sunday, President Donald Trump said early vaccinations would only be offered in specific cases.
............
Who will get the first vaccines in the White House?

Some of the first vaccines will be reserved for those who work in close proximity to Mr Trump, officials said told several US media outlets.

But eventually the vaccines will be offered to officials across all three branches of government, including the White House, Congress and the Supreme Court.

One unnamed official told Reuters news agency the vaccinations will ensure the government can "continue essential operations, without interruption".
a group of people standing next to a person in a suit and tie: White House chief of staff Mark Meadows is among those within President Trump's team to have previously tested positive for Covid-19 © EPA White House chief of staff Mark Meadows is among those within President Trump's team to have previously tested positive for Covid-19

The vaccination plan, first reported by the New York Times, was confirmed by National Security Council (NSC) spokesman John Ullyot on Sunday.

One aim of the programme was to build public confidence in the vaccine, he said.

"The American people should have confidence that they are receiving the same safe and effective vaccine as senior officials of the United States government on the advice of public health professionals and national security leadership," Mr Ullyot said.
a group of people performing on a counter: Boxes containing Pfizer's vaccine are being shipped across the US © Reuters Boxes containing Pfizer's vaccine are being shipped across the US

Later on Sunday, Mr Trump clarified in a tweet that "people working in the White House should receive the vaccine somewhat later in the programme, unless specifically necessary".

Mr Trump, who contracted coronavirus in November and recovered after treatment in hospital, added: "I am not scheduled to take the vaccine, but look forward to doing so at the appropriate time."
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