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Author Topic: Bad royal marriages & royal marriages going sour  (Read 4467 times)
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« Reply #30 on: August 03, 2021, 01:12:45 PM »

Princess Maria Pia of Savoy (24 September 1934) and her 1st husband Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia (Serbian: Александар П. Карађорђевић / Aleksandar P. Karađorđević)(13 August 1924 – 12 May 2016)


Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia was the elder son of Prince Paul, who served as Regent of Yugoslavia in the 1930s, and his wife, Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark. As a nephew of Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent (née of Greece and Denmark), he was a first cousin of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, Prince Michael of Kent, and Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy; he was also a first cousin once removed of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.


Maria Pia Elena Elisabetta Margherita Milena Mafalda Ludovica Tecla Gennara di Savoia was the first-born child of the Prince and Princess of Piedmont (Umberto and Marie Jose), born in Naples, Italy in 1934. Her parents, married since 1930, were unhappy together, as her mother confessed in an interview many years later (On n'a jamais été heureux, "We were never happy"), and separated after the Italian monarchy was abolished by plebiscite on 2 June 1946.


On the royal cruise of the yacht, Agamemnon, hosted by Queen Frederica of Greece on 22 August 1954, Maria Pia met and later married  Alexander  (1924–2016). The two were married on 12 February 1955 at Cascais in Portugal, where Maria Pia's father was living in exile.

Not long after their wedding, Maria Pia gave birth to the couple's set of fraternal twin sons. Another set of twins was born to Maria Pia during the marriage five years later, this time a girl and boy.

The couple were divorced in 1967.

On 2 November 1973, Alexander married in a civil ceremony in Paris Princess Barbara of Liechtenstein (9 July 1942), daughter of Prince Johannes of Liechtenstein (also first cousin once removed to both Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein and Princess Marie) and Countess Caroline of Ledebur-Wicheln. On 28 October 1995 Prince Alexander and Princess Barbara were married in the Orthodox faith in Oplenac, and had issue

In 2003, Maria Pia was married to Prince Michel of Bourbon-Parma (1926–2018), son of Prince René of Bourbon-Parma and Princess Margaret of Denmark, whose marriage with Princess Yolande de Broglie-Revel had been annulled and with whom he has five dynastic children, also being the father of a child born out of wedlock in 1977, Amélie de Bourbon de Parme (wed in 2009 to Igor Bogdanoff).


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« Reply #31 on: August 03, 2021, 01:15:53 PM »

Princess Maria Gabriella of Savoy (Maria Gabriella Giuseppa Aldegonda Adelaide Ludovica Felicita Gennara) (born 24 February 1940) and Robert Zellinger de Balkany (4 August 1931- 19 September 2015)


Maria Gabriella iis the middle daughter of Italy's last king, Umberto II, and Marie José of Belgium, the "May Queen", and a sister of a pretender to their father's throne, Vittorio Emanuele, Prince of Naples. She is a historical writer.

More about Robert Zellinger de Balkany is unknown to me.


In the 1950s, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Shah of Iran, then divorced from his second wife, indicated his interest in marrying Princess Maria Gabriella. Pope John XXIII reportedly vetoed the suggestion. In an editorial about the rumors surrounding the marriage of "a Muslim sovereign and a Catholic princess", the Vatican newspaper, L'Osservatore Romano, wrote that the match constituted "a grave danger."


On 12 February 1969 in Sainte-Mesme Maria Gabriella married Robert. The religious wedding was celebrated later on 21 June 1969 at Eze-sur-Mer, at Château Balsan.The couple separated in 1976 and divorced in November 1990. They had one child.
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« Reply #32 on: August 03, 2021, 01:20:02 PM »

Princess Maria Beatrice of Savoy (2 February 1943) and Luis Rafael Reyna-Corvalán y Dillon (18 April 1939  – died 17 February 1999)

Maria Beatrice is the youngest daughter and child of Italy's last King, Umberto II, and his wife, Queen Marie José.

Luis Rafael was the son of Cesar Augusto Reyna-Corvalán and Amalia Maria Dillon Calvo.


Maria Beatrice attempted to marry Italian actor Maurizio Arena in 1967 but was prevented by her family, who filed a lawsuit claiming that she was mentally unfit to marry. The lawsuit was dropped in early 1968 when the relationship ended

Maria Beatrice married Luis Rafael in 1970 (civil) and 1971 (religious). The couple had 3 children.

They separated in 1995 and were divorced in 1998.

Her ex-husband was murdered on 17 February 1999 in Cuernavaca, Mexico. Maria Beatrice did not attend his funeral
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« Reply #33 on: August 03, 2021, 01:25:31 PM »

Prince Amedeo of Savoy-Aosta, 5th Duke of Aosta (Amedeo Umberto Costantino Giorgio Paolo Elena Maria Fiorenzo Zvonimir di Savoia) (27 September 1943 – 1 June 2021) and his 1st wife Princess Claude of Orléans (Claude Marie Agnès Catherine) I(11 December 1943)


Claude was born on 11 December 1943 in Larache, Morocco as the ninth child and fifth daughter of Henri, Count of Paris, Orléanist claimant to the French throne, and his wife Princess Isabelle of Orléans-Braganza.

Amedeo was born at Villa della Cisterna in Florence, the only child of Prince Aimone, Duke of Aosta, formerly designated king of Croatia as Tomislav II, and of Princess Irene of Greece and Denmark through whom he was a great-great-grandson of Queen Victoria. Only three weeks before Amedeo's birth, Italy had surrendered to the Allies. His father, then king-designate of Croatia, abdicated.Italy's former ally, Germany, thereupon launched a military operation to occupy Italy. The infant Amedeo was arrested by the Nazis along with his mother, aunt, and two cousins, and sent to an internment camp in Austria. When Amedeo was only four years old, his father died in exile in Buenos Aires, and he succeeded him as Duke of Aosta, Prince della Cisterna e Belriguardo, Marchese di Voghera, and Count di Ponderano.


On 22 July 1964 Amedeo married his second cousin,Claude in Sintra, Portugal. Amedeo and Claude had three children. Amedeo and Claude officially separated 20 July 1976, obtained a civil divorce 26 April 1982, and an ecclesiastical annulment from the Roman Rota 8 January 1987.


On 30 March 1987, Amedeo married Silvia Paternò di Spedalotto (b. Palermo, 31 December 1953) in the chapel of Villa Spedalotto in Bagheria, Sicily. She is the daughter of Vincenzo Paternò di Spedalotto, 6th Marchese di Reggiovanni, and of Rosanna Bellardo e Ferraris. Amedeo and Silvia had no children.

Amedeo had a daughter with Kyara van Ellinkhuizen, born outside of wedlock.


Claude remarried twice: civilly on 27 April 1982 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti with Luigi Arnaldo La Cagnina (divorced in 1996), a television journalist in the United States and Canada, and both civilly and religiously with Enrico Gandolfi in 2006 in Oreno, Milan). Gandolfi died on 27 October 2015 in Laterina.
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« Reply #34 on: August 03, 2021, 01:30:57 PM »

Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna of Russia (Russian: Мари́я Влади́мировна Рома́нова) (23 December 1953) and Prince Franz Wilhelm of Prussia (Franz Wilhelm Victor Christoph Stephan Prinz von Preussen) (3 September 1943)

Maria Vladimirovna was born in Madrid, the only child of Grand Duke Vladimir Kirillovich of Russia, head of the Imperial Family of Russia and titular Emperor of Russia, and Princess Leonida Bagration-Mukhrani of Georgian, Polish, German and Swedish descent. Her paternal grandparents were Grand Duke Kirill Vladimirovich of Russia and Grand Duchess Victoria Fyodorovna (née Princess Victoria Melita of Edinburgh and Saxe-Coburg-Gotha) through whom she is a great-great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria. On 23 December 1969, upon reaching her dynastic majority, Maria swore an oath of loyalty to her father, to Russia, and to uphold the Fundamental Laws of Russia which governed succession to the defunct throne. At the same time, her father issued a controversial decree recognising her as heiress presumptive and declaring that, in the event he predeceased other dynastic Romanov males, then Maria would become the "Curatrix of the Imperial Throne" until the death of the last male dynast. This has been viewed as an attempt by her father to ensure the succession remained in his branch of the imperial family, while the heads of the other branches of the imperial family, the Princes Vsevolod Ioannovich of the Konstantinovichi, Roman Petrovich of the Nikolaevichi and Prince Andrei Alexandrovich of the Mihailovichi declared that her father's actions were illegal.As it happened, Vladimir Kirillovich, who died in 1992, outlived all the other male Romanov dynasts, and his daughter had no occasion to assume curatorship.


Prince Franz Wilhelm of Prussia was born in Grünberg, Silesia, as the son of Prince Karl Franz of Prussia (1916–1975) and his first wife Princess Henriette von Schönaich-Carolath (1918–1972). He had a twin brother, Prince Friedrich Christian, who died three weeks after his birth. Prince Franz Wilhelm is a grandson of Prince Joachim of Prussia, the youngest son of Emperor Wilhelm II.


Franz Wilhelm married his third cousin once removed,  Maria Vladimirovna civilly at Dinard on 4 September 1976 and religiously on 22 September 1976 in Madrid. Before his marriage he converted to the Russian Orthodox faith and was created a Grand Duke of Russia with the name Mikhail Pavlovich by his father-in-law Grand Duke Vladimir of Russia. The couple separated in 1982, a year after the birth of their only child, George Mikhailovich, who had been granted the title Grand Duke of Russia at birth by his grandfather Vladimir. Following the divorce on 19 June 1985, Franz Wilhelm reverted to his Prussian name and style. Franz Wilhelm married Nadia Nour in 2019.


Maria never remarried.

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« Reply #35 on: August 03, 2021, 01:43:46 PM »

Marie-Cécile Kira Victoria Louise van Prussia (28 May 1942) and Duke Frederik August van Oldenburg (1936-2017)

Marie-Cécile  is a daughter of Louis Ferdinand of Prussia (a grandson of the last German Emperor Wilhelm II) and Kira Kirillovna of Russia. Both her parents were great-grandchildren of the British Queen Victoria.

Friedrich August Wilhelm Christian Ernst Herzog von Oldenburg (11 January 1936 – 9 July 2017) was a Duke of Oldenburg who held the predicate Highness. He was a son of Hereditary Grand Duke Nicolaas van Oldenburg and his first wife Princess Helena van Waldeck-Pyrmont, a grandniece of the Dutch Queen Juliana.


Marie-Cécile  married Frederik August on December 3, 1965. The couple had 3 children.


Marie-Cécile and her husband divorced in 1989.

To the consternation of some in the Prussian royal family, Frederik August remarried in 1991 to Donata van Castell-Rüdenhausen (1950-2015), who was married at first to a brother of Frederik August's first wife (Donata was a widow) and who is the mother of Georg Friedrich Ferdinand of Prussia. (1976), head of the House of Hohenzollern; no children were born from the second marriage.
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« Reply #36 on: August 03, 2021, 01:53:10 PM »

Princess Irene of the Netherlands (Irene Emma Elisabeth) (5 August 1939) and Carlos Hugo, Duke of Parma and Piacenza (8 April 1930 – 18 August 2010).


Carlos Hugo was the son of Xavier, Duke of Parma, and Madeleine de Bourbon-Busset and was baptized Hugues Marie Sixte Robert Louis Jean Georges Benoît Michel. He was a direct male descendant of Louis XIV. On 28 June 1963 he was officially renamed Charles Hugues, by judgment of the court of appeal of la Seine, France. In 1977, his father died, and Carlos Hugo succeeded him claiming the thrones of Parma, Etruria and Spain. He was a French citizen, and from 1980, a naturalized Spanish citizen.


Irene is the second child and daughter of Queen Juliana I of the Netherlands and Prince Bernhard.The princess was born on 5 August 1939 at Soestdijk Palace. At the time of her birth, war was a distinct possibility but, because her parents hoped for a peaceful solution, they chose to name their new daughter for Eirene, the Greek goddess of peace. She has 3 sisters, the eldest of whom is the former queen of the Netherlands, Princess Beatrix of the Netherlands


Irene was a bridesmaid at the 1962 wedding of Prince Juan Carlos of Spain and Princess Sophia of Greece and Denmark.


While studying Spanish in Madrid, Irene met Carlos Hugo, Duke of Parma, the eldest son of Carlist pretender to the Spanish throne, Xavier. In the summer of 1963, Princess Irene secretly converted from Protestantism to Roman Catholicism. When news leaked out that she was engaged to Prince Carlos Hugo, it provoked a Protestant outcry and a constitutional crisis.Although Dutch law did not forbid a Catholic to reign over the Netherlands, Protestant succession was traditional, born out of the 16th-century Eighty Years' War with Spain and the assassination of Willem of Orange by a supporter of Philip II of Spain who believed William had betrayed both the Spanish monarch and the Catholic Church. By the middle of the 20th century religious attitudes had begun to change, but only very slowly. While members of the Roman Catholic Church accounted for approximately 34 percent of the Dutch population, and Catholic political parties had been in coalition governments since 1918, the high fertility rate of the Catholics was a matter of some concern for all non-Catholics.


Fresh memories of Francisco Franco's association with fascism amplified the crisis over a royal conversion to Catholicism and a marriage without approval of the Dutch States-General. For the second in line to the throne to not only convert to Roman Catholicism, but to also associate with an alleged Franco sympathizer, caused shock and consternation in the Netherlands. Queen Juliana attempted to stop the marriage, first by sending a member of her staff to Madrid to persuade the Princess not to go ahead with a marriage that would be a political disaster for the monarchy in the Netherlands. It seemed to work and the Queen went on Dutch radio to tell the citizens that Princess Irene had agreed to cancel her engagement and was returning to the Netherlands. When the airplane arrived at Schiphol Airport, the Princess was not on it, and Queen Juliana and her husband, Prince Bernhard were supplied with a Dutch military plane to go to Spain to retrieve their daughter. However, a message was delivered to the Queen from the Dutch government warning that it would resign en masse if she set foot in Spain. It was suggested that Princess Irene was a pawn of General Francisco Franco who tried to maximize the event to his benefit. Given the ramifications and the fact that a monarch from the House of Orange had never visited Spain, the Queen had no choice but to turn back. Prince Bernhard then traveled to Madrid to meet with his daughter and her fiancé, who both accompanied him back to the Netherlands, where an immediate meeting took place with the couple, the Queen, Prime Minister Marijnen, himself a Roman Catholic, and three top cabinet ministers.When the meeting ended in the early hours of the morning on Sunday, 9 February 1964, Dutch radio broke its traditional Sabbath day silence to announce that Princess Irene would give up any rights of succession to the throne so she could marry Carlos Hugo.


No one from the Dutch Royal family or any Dutch diplomatic representative attended the marriage of Princess Irene and Prince Carlos Hugo in the Borghese Chapel at the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome, Italy, on 29 April 1964. There were also no representatives of Spain's Franco government at the ceremony; the couple chose Rome as the site of their nuptials because of its neutrality.


After the wedding, Irene was very active in her husband's right-wing political cause, but over time they drifted away from right-wing extremism to left-wing sympathies and became a part of the international jet-set crowd. In 1977, Irene was expelled from Spain because of her political views; her husband was also barred from the country for the same reason. Prince Carlos was allowed to return in late 1977, but Princess Irene was not permitted back in the country until April 1978. The prince, head of the Royal House of Bourbon-Parma, became a naturalized Spanish citizen in 1979. The couple had four children, but the marriage ended in divorce in 1981.


Both never remarried. And Carlos Hugo stayed on good terms with his former family in law (among others attending special family events).

De Bourbon de Parme family, has been incorporated into the Dutch nobility since 1996

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« Reply #37 on: August 03, 2021, 02:04:31 PM »

A royal wedding and divorce that became famous in the Netherlands:

Princess Margarita Maria Beatriz of Bourbon-Parma, Countess of Colorno (Dutch: Margarita Maria Beatrix Prinses de Bourbon de Parme)(13 October 1972) and her 1st husband Edwin Karel Willem de Roy van Zuydewijn (19 juni 1966)


Margarita is the eldest daughter and second child of the marriage of the Dutch princess Irene of the Netherlands and Carlos Hugo Duke of Bourbon-Parma. On September 2, 1996, Margarita received from her father the Parmesan title Countess of Colorno, which was not recognized in the Netherlands. Margarita is officially referred to as Her Royal Highness Margarita Princess de Bourbon de Parme. Margarita has a twin brother, Jaime, who was born one minute after her.


Edwin Karel Willem de Roy van Zuydewijn is a member of the De Roy family, was born on the Keizersgracht in Amsterdam, the fifth child and first son of the lawyer Leo de Roy van Zuydewijn, from a non-noble branch of the Dutch patrician family De Roy van Zuydewijn, and Wijnande Eleonore van golden. His parents divorced two years after his birth; his father died when De Roy van Zuydewijn was twelve years old.


In 1998 Edwin became acquainted with Margarita. The couple married on June 19, 2001 in Amsterdam. The church wedding was celebrated in September of that year in Auch (France) by Mgr. Philippe Bär, Bishop Emeritus of Rotterdam.


In 2003, a series of events took place that became known as the "Margarita Affair". In that year, Margarita and her then husband were regularly in the news. The couple gave an extensive interview to the weekly magazine HP/De Tijd, which published this in episodes and was shown on television several times. They accused the Royal House and the AIVD of wiretapping and announced that they would file a sizeable claim for damages for thwarting Fincentives, De Roy van Zuydewijn's company. It subsequently transpired that the Cabinet of the Queen had indeed deployed the AIVD to investigate new members of the royal family, without this being reported to the Prime Minister. This possibility came to an end by transferring the responsibility for the Queen's Office to the Ministry of General Affairs. The AIVD was able to convincingly disprove that the couple had been wiretapped. According to Margarita, they had been tapped by a microphone in the paneling of the office of the director-general of the Government Information Service Eef Brouwers. This showed on television that Margarita had mistakenly mistook the top of a screw for a tapping microphone. On January 8, 2004, the lawyers of Margarita and De Roy van Zuydewijn presented a list of witnesses to the court in The Hague, including her grandfather Bernhard and her father Carlos Hugo. The court rejected this request on February 5, 2004.

On August 13, 2004, Margarita's lawyer Germ Kemper announced that she and Edwin were divorcing, against Edwin's wishes. Earlier that day, it was revealed that Margarita's personal papers had been stolen from her car; It is suspected that this also included the divorce papers.

The marriage, from which no children were born, was dissolved on November 8, 2006 by divorce. Registration for this took place on February 28, 2007.

Margarita remarried on 3 May 2008 to Tjalling Siebe ten Cate (23 December 1975), a lawyer at De Nederlandsche Bank. Two children (both daughters) were born of the marriage


Edwin continued to litigate against, among other things, the Dutch royal family. I don't know how he is doing at the moment

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« Reply #38 on: August 03, 2021, 02:09:45 PM »

King George IV of England and Caroline of Brunswick
It was disgust at first sight. When the dandified, spoiled George, Prince of Wales, first met his betrothed Caroline of Brunswick at St. James Palace in 1795, he was less than impressed. “He raised her (gracefully enough) and embraced her, said barely one word, turned around, retired to a distant part of the apartment, calling me to him and said, ‘Harris, I am not well, pray get me a glass of brandy.’”

According to historians, his fiancée was also disappointed, exclaiming that the prince was “very fat and nothing like as handsome as his portrait.”

Thus began perhaps the most acrimonious marriage in the history of British royalty. The night of the wedding, the despairing prince was so drunk he was unable to consummate the union.“Judge what it was to have a drunken husband on one’s wedding day, and one who passed the greatest part of his bridal night under the grate, where he fell, and where I left him,” Caroline would later scoff.

Unofficially separated after a few weeks, the equally erratic and dramatic couple would be in a war of words for the next three decades, and the country (and its cartoonists) would take sides. The era’s greatest author, Jane Austen, was firmly on Team Caroline. “Poor woman, I shall support her as long as I can, because she is a woman and because I hate her Husband,” Austen wrote.

The feud would culminate in Caroline (whom her husband dubbed a “monster”) being put on trial for adultery (she was acquitted) and attempting to crash her husband’s coronation when he was crowned King George IV in 1821. The doors of Westminster Abbey were slammed in the rightful queen’s face, and she died the next month.


Source: https://www.vanityfair.co...s-as-catherine-the-greats
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« Reply #39 on: August 03, 2021, 02:10:36 PM »

Jérôme Bonaparte and Elizabeth Patterson

When Bonaparte family historian Theo Aronson writes that a marriage was “the most disastrous” match in the entire dysfunctional dynasty, that’s saying something. In 1803, the dashing, dissolute Jérôme was sent overseas by his big brother, Napoleon. Through a series of misadventures, he found himself in the American city of Baltimore and recklessly in love with Elizabeth Patterson, the town’s most beautiful 18 year old. Much to the chagrin of Jérôme’s horrified French handlers, they married. The bride wore a shocking, sheer-ish Empire gown. The ambitious Patterson was thrilled, claiming that she “would rather be the wife of Jérôme Bonaparte for one hour than the wife of any other man for life.”

News of the marriage caused a firestorm in the Bonaparte clan. Napoleon demanded his brother come home to answer for his actions. Once in Napoleon’s presence, the weak-willed, shallow Jérôme crumbled, and he abandoned his American wife. But the steely, brilliant Elizabeth had a trump card—their son called Bo, born in 1805. Forever after, the more suitably remarried Jérôme, who his brother made King of Westphalia, would be haunted by his wittier, tougher ex-wife, who would make periodic tours of Europe to argue for her son’s rights and stick it to the Bonapartes.

Source: https://www.vanityfair.co...s-as-catherine-the-greats
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« Reply #40 on: August 03, 2021, 02:12:14 PM »

Empress Wanrong and Puyi, Last Emperor of China

There are few more tragic tales than the marriage of teenagers Puyi and Wanrong, the last Emperor and Empress of China. On their wedding night in 1922, Puyi fled the marital bed before consummation, setting the tone for their union. They were hopelessly mismatched; Wanrong was chic, passionate, and cultured, while Piyu was awkward and cold, and apparently more interested in young men. Although he would take other wives—one specifically to spite Wanrong, whom he found arrogant and meddling—Puyi felt little for his consorts, referring to them in his autobiography as pieces of “furniture” and his “victims.”

Caught in the turmoil of 20th century conflicts, the couple floundered. Wanrong escaped her loneliness by smoking increasing amounts of opium. She also had affairs, and in 1935 gave birth to a baby girl. Although she begged her enraged husband to let her keep the baby, Puyi reportedly had the child thrown into a boiler shortly after birth. Not surprisingly, after this trauma Wanrong’s mental state declined and her opium addiction grew. The couple parted in the chaotic aftermath of World War II. In 1945, Wanrong died in a prison camp, hallucinating that her guards were servants in the Forbidden City.

Source: https://www.vanityfair.co...s-as-catherine-the-greats
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« Reply #41 on: August 03, 2021, 02:29:17 PM »

Princess Caroline Louise Marguerite of Monaco (23 January 1957) and her 3 marriages

Caroline was born on 23 January 1957 in the Prince's Palace, Monaco. She is the eldest child of Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, and his wife, former American actress Grace Kelly. Caroline belongs to the House of Grimaldi. She was the heiress presumptive from her birth to 14 March 1958, when her brother Prince Albert was born. On 1 February 1965, her younger sister Princess Stéphanie was born.

1. Caroline's first husband was Philippe Junot (19 April 1940). Philipe is the son of Michel Junot, Deputy Mayor of Paris, former President of Maison de l'Europe, and Lydia Thykjær, the daughter of a Danish industrialist.  At the time he was  a Parisian banker. The story goes her parents were against this wedding. But they were married civilly in Monaco on 28 June 1978, and religiously on 29 June 1978. The press described Philippe as an Parisian playboy and also said Caroline had tired of their jet set lifestyle, and word on the street was Junot hadn't slowed down since getting hitched. The marriage ended badly in 1980. The couple divorced, childless, on 9 October 1980. In 1992, the Roman Catholic Church granted the princess a canonical declaration of nullity.

2. Caroline's second husband was Stefano Casiraghi (8 September 1960 – 3 October 1990), the sportsman heir to an Italian industrial fortune.  Stefano was the son of Giancarlo Casiraghi (1925–1998), a wealthy businessman, and Fernanda Casiraghi (née Biffi), Stefano Casiraghi grew up in the Casiraghi family's estate, Villa Cigogne, in Fino Mornasco. He had two brothers, Marco and Daniele (died in 2016), and one sister, Rosalba. Stefano was involved in the real estate and retail export enterprises of the family business that his father had built up. On 29 December 1983 in Monaco, he and  Caroline married in a civil ceremony in the Hall of Mirrors of the Monegasque Princely Palace. They were not able to have a Catholic ceremony because Caroline had been divorced from Philippe Junot, and an annulment had not yet been obtained. However, as Caroline was over three months pregnant, the couple did not want to wait any longer. The couple had three children: Andrea (born 8 June 1984), Charlotte (born 3 August 1986), and Pierre (born 5 September 1987). The children are, respectively, fourth, eighth and eleventh in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne, after their twin cousins and their mother. Although their parents had not married in the Church, as required for legitimacy under church law, they were legitimized by Pope John Paul II in February 1993, eight months after their mother's marriage to Junot was annulled in June 1992. Casiraghi was killed in an offshore powerboat racing accident off the coast of Monaco near Cap Ferrat on 3 October 1990 while defending his world offshore title. He was 30 years old and had planned to retire after the race. Only weeks earlier, he had survived an accident when his boat blew up off the coast of Guernsey.


3. Caroline's third and current husband is Prince Ernst August of Hanover, Duke of Brunswick, head of the House of Hanover which lost its throne in 1866. Ernst August (26 February 1954) is the eldest son of Ernst August, Hereditary Prince of Brunswick (1914–1987) and his first wife, Princess Ortrud of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (1925–1980). He was christened Ernst August Albert Paul Otto Rupprecht Oskar Berthold Friedrich-Ferdinand Christian-Ludwig. As the senior male-line descendant of George III of the United Kingdom, Ernst August is head of the House of Hanover. Rumour has it that several year ago Caroline's mother saw Ernst August as potential wedding material for her eldest daughter. Ernst August was firstly married to Chantal Hochuli (2 June 1955 ), the daughter and heiress of a Swiss German architect and real estate developer, Johann Gustav (Hans) Hochuli (14 March 1912 - ?), and his German wife Rosmarie Lembeck (8 April 1921 - 12 December 2011). They have two sons, Prince Ernst August (born 19 July 1983) and Prince Christian (born 1 June 1985). Ernst August and Chantal Hochuli divorced in London on 23 October 1997. Ernst August married secondly, civilly in Monaco on 23 January 1999, Princess Caroline of Monaco, who was at the time expecting the birth of their child, Princess Alexandra (born 20 July 1999). In 2009, it was reported that Caroline had separated from Ernst August and returned to live in Monaco.
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« Reply #42 on: August 03, 2021, 03:52:09 PM »

Archduke Otto Franz Joseph Karl Ludwig Maria of Austria (21 April 1865 – 1 November 1906) and Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony (31 May 1867 – 28 May 1944)


Maria Josepha Louise Philippina Elisabeth Pia Angelica Margaretha was the daughter of the future King George of Saxony (1832–1904) and Infanta Maria Anna of Portugal (1843–1884).

Archduke Otto Franz Joseph Karl Ludwig Maria of Austria (21 April 1865 – 1 November 1906) was the second son of Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria (younger brother of Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria) and his second wife, Princess Maria Annunciata of Bourbon-Two Sicilies.


On 2 October 1886 at age nineteen, Maria Josepha married Otto Franz, "der Schöne" (the handsome), younger brother of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand who would later be killed in Sarajevo. For Otto Franz this marriage was under pressure from the imperial court. The court in Vienna urgently needed such a wedding to repair their relationship with the Saxon royal family, after both Crown Prince Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria and Otto's brother Franz Ferdinand had snubbed the Saxons by rejecting Maria's elder sister Mathilde.

Otto and Maria had two sons. The eldest being the later Emperor Karl I of Austria

Their marriage was unhappy, and the Archduke was often unfaithful. He had illegitimate children including two by his mistress, Marie Schleinzer

A pious woman, only her strength of religion enabled her to bear the burdens of marriage to the notoriously womanizing "gorgeous Archduke". His frequent absences from his family helped her goal of keeping her children away from his bad influence succeed. Eventually, however, she herself entered into a relationship with the actor Otto Tressler, who had been presented to her by the emperor Franz Joseph, who felt sorry for her because of the adultery of her spouse. Maria Josepha often invited Tressler to her home; he sometimes met her husband and his friends in the doorway. When her husband died, her ability to avoid extravagant displays of grief was much admired. As a widow, she ended her relationship with Tressler, probably because of her sense of what was appropriate behaviour for a widow.
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Principessa

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« Reply #43 on: August 03, 2021, 04:12:36 PM »

Ernest I (German: Ernst Anton Karl Ludwig)(2 January 1784 – 29 January 1844) was the last sovereign duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (as Ernest III) and, from 1826, the first sovereign duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (as Ernest I). He was married to Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (Louise Dorothea Pauline Charlotte Fredericka Auguste) (21 December 1800 – 30 August 1831)


Princess Louise was the only daughter of Augustus, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg and his first wife Louise Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, daughter of Frederick Francis I, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (her namesake).

Ernest was born on 2 January 1784. He is the eldest son of Francis, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, and Countess Augusta of Reuss-Ebersdorf. His youngest brother, Leopold Georg Christian Frederick, was later elected the first King of the Belgians. While his sister  Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (17 August 1786 – 16 March 1861) would remarry (2nd marriage) Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, KG, KP, GCB, GCH, PC (Edward Augustus; 2 November 1767 – 23 January 1820) & give birth to Princess Victoria (the later Queen Victoria).


On 10 May 1803, aged 19, Ernest was proclaimed an adult because his father had become gravely ill, and he was required to take part in the government of the duchy. When his father died in 1806, he succeeded in the duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld as Ernest III.

Ernest married Louise in Gotha on 3 July 1817. They had two children, among others Albert (the later prince consort of Queen Victoria).

The marriage was unhappy because both husband and wife were promiscuous. As the biographer Lytton Strachey put it: "The ducal court was not noted for the strictness of its morals; the Duke was a man of gallantry, and the Duchess followed her husband's example. There were scandals: one of the Court Chamberlains, a charming and cultivated man of Jewish extraction, was talked of; at last there was a separation, followed by a divorce." Ernest and Louise were separated in 1824 and were officially divorced on 31 March 1826. As heirs to Coburg, the children remained with their father. Louise died in 1831.


In Coburg on 23 December 1832, Ernest married his niece Duchess Marie of Württemberg, the daughter of his sister Antoinette. They had no children. This marriage made Marie both Prince Albert's first cousin and his stepmother.


Ernest had illegitimate children
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #44 on: August 03, 2021, 04:13:02 PM »

Juan Carlos and Sofia.  A marriage the Spanish press kept selling as great when they had been leading separate lives for 30 years.  



 Star  How did we forget them???

And  Star for all your detective work, Princi!  Always appreciate it!
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