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Author Topic: Bad royal marriages & royal marriages going sour  (Read 4991 times)
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Principessa

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« on: July 31, 2021, 10:25:28 AM »

https://natureworldtoday....l-weddings-history-is/12/
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2021, 06:17:50 PM »


Fascinating Princi!  Star  Although the author mixed up Mary Tudor and Mary Queen of Scots in the last example.

I wonder why they left off Ena and Alfonso of Spain? Their marriage was unhappy and started off with a bomb thrown into the wedding procession which killed 23 people. Bad omen!
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Celia

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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2021, 09:53:37 PM »

And they used a picture of Catherine of Aragon for Mary Tudor, duchess of Suffolk.  Well, as sound bites, it was cute.
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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2021, 10:45:25 PM »


Fascinating Princi!  Star  Although the author mixed up Mary Tudor and Mary Queen of Scots in the last example.

I wonder why they left off Ena and Alfonso of Spain? Their marriage was unhappy and started off with a bomb thrown into the wedding procession which killed 23 people. Bad omen!

Imo they mentioned the most known ones.

There're several lovely marriages missing.

F.e.
Leopold II. of Belgium and Marie Henriette of Austria
Pedro I. of Brazil and Leopoldine of Austria
Joseph II. of the HRR and Maria Josepha of Bavaria

Or minor royals:
Aribert of Anhalt and Marie Louise of Schleswig-Holstein
Wilhelm GD of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach and Caroline of Reuss
Philipp of Coburg and Louise of Belgium
Georg Count Jametel and Marie of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2021, 02:22:45 AM »

King George IV of England and Caroline of Brunswick
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Principessa

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« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2021, 10:57:03 AM »


Fascinating Princi!  Star  Although the author mixed up Mary Tudor and Mary Queen of Scots in the last example.

I wonder why they left off Ena and Alfonso of Spain? Their marriage was unhappy and started off with a bomb thrown into the wedding procession which killed 23 people. Bad omen!

Imo they mentioned the most known ones.

There're several lovely marriages missing.

F.e.
Leopold II. of Belgium and Marie Henriette of Austria
Pedro I. of Brazil and Leopoldine of Austria
Joseph II. of the HRR and Maria Josepha of Bavaria

Or minor royals:
Aribert of Anhalt and Marie Louise of Schleswig-Holstein
Wilhelm GD of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach and Caroline of Reuss
Philipp of Coburg and Louise of Belgium
Georg Count Jametel and Marie of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Indeed, but we can add them to this topic Wink Smiley
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« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2021, 10:57:30 AM »

King George IV of England and Caroline of Brunswick

Thanks for the addition CyrilSebastian!
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« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2021, 10:58:19 AM »

Peter III and Catherina the Great of Russia: 
https://www.biography.com...-great-peter-iii-marriage
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« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2021, 11:01:49 AM »

Peter III and Catherina the Great of Russia: 
https://www.biography.com...-great-peter-iii-marriage

Oh yes that one was pretty bad.

Another Russian one:
Grand Duke Konstantin Pavlovich and Princesse Juliane of SCG.

GD Sergei Alexandrovich and Princesse Elisabeth of Hesse-Darmstadt.

About this one I've heard/read various versions from being a love match to him being brutal etc.
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« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2021, 11:07:55 AM »

Prince Joachim of Prussia (17 December 1890 – 18 July 1920), the youngest son of German Emperor Wilhelm II and Princess Marie Auguste of Anhalt (10 June 1898 – 22 May 1983).

On 11 March 1916 in Berlin, Marie-Auguste married Prince Joachim of Prussia. She and Joachim, who was Wilhelm's last unmarried child, had been officially engaged since 14 October of the previous year. The couple had one son, Prince Karl Franz Josef Wilhelm Friedrich Eduard Paul (15 December 1916 – 22 January 1975). Their grandson, Prince Franz Wilhelm, married Maria Vladimirovna of Russia, a pretender to the Imperial Russian throne.

The couple were divorced soon after the end of WWI. The direct causes of the divorce are not really known to the public, only that there had been no previous report of marital troubles before the divorce was announced. According to another report, Marie-Auguste had previously abandoned her husband and child to run away with another man, had been forcibly brought back home on the orders of the Kaiser, and had filed for divorce as soon as the war ended, when she saw that her husband's family were at their lowest ebb. Regardless of the reasons, this event was one of the main reasons why Prince Joachim died by suicide only weeks after the divorce was finalized.


On 18 July 1920, very shortly after the divorce, Joachim shot himself in Potsdam. One source reports that he had been in financial straits and suffered from "great mental depression". His own brother Prince Eitel Friedrich of Prussia commented that he suffered from "a fit of excessive dementia"


After Joachim's suicide, Marie-Auguste's son Karl Franz was taken into the custody of his paternal uncle Prince Eitel Friedrich.As the acting head of the House of Hohenzollern, he claimed this right, due to the fact that the Emperor Wilhelm had issued an edict placing Hohenzollern powers in Eitel's hands. This action was later declared to have been unlawful, and in 1921, Marie-Auguste was given full custody of her son, despite that fact that she had previously run away from her husband and despite numerous servants having testified against her, with Eitel's counsel arguing that Marie-Auguste was unfit to have custody of Karl Franz. However, she appeared in court and pleaded that she was heartbroken, which may have helped to win the case for her. In 1922, Marie-Auguste sued her former father-in-law for the financial support that had been promised in the marriage contract between her and Prince Joachim. Wilhelm's advocate argued that the laws of the House of Hohenzollern were no longer in force, so there was no longer a financial obligation to support her.


On 27 September 1926, she married Johannes-Michael Freiherr von Loën, a childhood friend. They were divorced in 1935, and Marie-Auguste reverted to her maiden name.

In 1980, Princess Marie-Auguste legally adopted the businessman Hans Lichtenberg, who subsequently took the name Frédéric Prinz von Anhalt. According to von Anhalt, who thereafter proceeded to sell knighthoods and marriages related to his new station, he gave her $4,000 a month (German sources say 2000 Deutsche Mark a month) in financial support.
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« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2021, 11:08:42 AM »

Peter III and Catherina the Great of Russia: 
https://www.biography.com...-great-peter-iii-marriage

Oh yes that one was pretty bad.

Another Russian one:
Grand Duke Konstantin Pavlovich and Princesse Juliane of SCG.

GD Sergei Alexandrovich and Princesse Elisabeth of Hesse-Darmstadt.

About this one I've heard/read various versions from being a love match to him being brutal etc.

Indeed, with regard to the last one I have heard predominantly positive stories
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« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2021, 11:16:39 AM »

Princess Louise of the Netherlands (Wilhelmina Frederika Alexandrine Anna Louise) (5 August 1828 – 30 March 1871) and Charles XV also Carl of Sweden (Carl Ludvig Eugen) (3 May 1826 – 18 September 1872)


Princess Louise was born on 5 August 1828 in The Hague. Her father was Prince Frederik of the Netherlands, the second child of King Willem I of the Netherlands and Wilhelmina of Prussia. Her mother Louise was the eighth child of King Frederik Wilhelm III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.

(then) Prince Carl was born as the eldest son of Crown Prince Oscar of Sweden and his wife Crown Princess Josephine, he would be second in line to the throne of his grandfather, the ruling King Charles XIV John of Sweden.


In 1849, Louise was selected as a suitable spouse for (then) Crown Prince Charles. The marriage was arranged after the negotiations to arrange a marriage between Charles and her cousin Princess Louise of Prussia had failed. King Oscar I of Sweden wished to secure royal family connections between the new Bernadotte dynasty and the old royal dynasties of Europe, and a Protestant princess was also seen as a necessary queen of the Protestant Sweden-Norway after two Catholic predecessors. Louise fulfilled these credentials, and a great dowry was expected from the rich House of Orange-Nassau. The engagement was officially declared in February 1850. The expectations of her great fortune was debated in Sweden, both in the parliament during the discussions about the allowance, and in the radical press. In reality, however, her dowry turned out to be very small. During the engagement, Louise studied the Swedish language and history; she never learnt Norwegian, however. Because the Dutch government had supported the marriage, she did not have to renounce her rights to the Dutch throne upon her marriage. Princess Louise and Crown Prince Charles married at Storkyrkan in Stockholm on 19 June 1850.

The relationship between Louise and Charles was unhappy.The couple had dissimilar personalities, with Louise being introverted, shy and with a preference for a simple life, and Charles extraverted and with a love for parties and social life. Louise was reportedly unhappily in love with Charles, who found her unattractive and was unfaithful to her, which pained her considerably.

Louise bore two children; Princess Louise in 1851, and Prince Carl Oscar in 1852. Due to complications that arose at the birth of Prince Carl Oscar, Louise was unable to have any more children. In 1854, her 2-year-old son, Carl Oscar, died of pneumonia. As the Salic law prevailed at that time in Sweden (having been introduced by the constitution of 1809), Louise's daughter was not eligible to ascend the throne. Charles was very chagrined and disappointed because this meant that his progeny would not be the next monarch of Sweden; his heir would be his brother Oscar. Louise offered Charles a divorce so he could remarry and produce a male heir, but he declined the offer.


Crown Princess Louise was not considered a social success, and her timid and shy nature was not appreciated in society because of her official position.


In 1870, Queen Louise visited the Netherlands to be present at the death bed of her mother. Upon her return to Stockholm, Charles XV fell sick and she nursed him. Exhausted, she contracted pneumonia during a walk by carriage. On her death bed, she had long conversations with her family, which have been described as dramatic. Her daughter claimed: "It was as if mother exposed her entire life to us". Louise asked Charles to forgive her everything in which she could have failed him, to which he responded by accusing himself, after which both he and his mother Josephine reportedly fainted because they were so moved.


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« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2021, 11:18:19 AM »

Juan Carlos and Sofia.  A marriage the Spanish press kept selling as great when they had been leading separate lives for 30 years.  

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« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2021, 11:22:11 AM »

Archduchess Elisabeth Marie of Austria (Elisabeth Marie Henriette Stephanie Gisela)(2 September 1883 – 16 March 1963) and her 1st husband  Prince Otto Weriand of Windisch-Graetz (1873–1952)


Elisabeth was the only child of Rudolf, Crown Prince of Austria and Princess Stéphanie of Belgium, and a granddaughter of Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria and King Leopold II of the Belgians. She was known to the family as "Erzsi", a diminutive of her name in Hungarian. Later nicknamed "The Red Archduchess", she was famous for becoming a socialist and a member of the Austrian Social Democratic Party.

Otto was the son of Prince Ernst Ferdinand Weriand of Windisch-Graetz (1827-1918) and Princess Kamilla Amalia Caroline Notgera of Oettingen-Oettingen und Oettingen-Spielberg (1845-1888).


During a court ball in 1900, Elisabeth met Otto. Ten years her senior, he was below her in rank. Nonetheless she importuned her grandfather to be allowed to marry him. Franz Joseph resisted at first, having intended for Elisabeth to marry the German Crown Prince, but eventually relented. By many accounts it was Elisabeth alone who wanted the marriage, as Otto was already engaged to a Countess von Schönborn and was reportedly dumbfounded when Franz Joseph informed him of his new engagement. Ordered by the Emperor to break his "lesser" engagement to marry his granddaughter, he complied


In order to avoid future succession issues, the Emperor made the marriage conditional on Elisabeth's renouncing her right to succession, although he allowed her to keep her personal title and style, as well as providing her with a generous dowry. While his family was officially listed in the Habsburg list of families which were allowed to make an equal marriage (Ebenbürtigkeit) with an Imperial family, they still regarded Otto's Mediatized House and the marriage as a mésalliance and wanted the marriage to be treated as morganatic. As it was a case of the Emperor's favorite granddaughter and Otto's family was legally considered equal for dynastic purposes, as were marriages with all other mediatized Princely families, the marriage was officially treated as equal and his family would have grounds for pressing Elisabeth to become empress should the succession become interrupted again.


The couple married at the Hofburg on 23 January 1902. They had three sons: Prince Franz Joseph (1904–1981), Prince Ernst (1905–1952) and Prince Rudolf (1907–1939). And their last child and only daughter, Princess Stephanie (1909–2005).


The marriage, however, was troubled, and led to unwelcome reminders for the Emperor of his son's death, and possible further scandal for the family. Throughout their marriage both Elisabeth and Otto were open in having affairs, most notably the former's liaison with Egon Lerch, an Austrian submarine captain during World War I. Only after the death of Franz Joseph in 1916 and the end of the monarchy in 1918 did the couple officially separate. In 1921 Elisabeth joined the Social Democratic Party, where she met Leopold Petznek from Bruck an der Leitha, then president of the audit office, at one of the election meetings. A teacher and a committed Social Democratic politician who became president of the Lower Austrian Landtag (state parliament) after the war, Petznek came from a modest background, but was highly cultivated. He was also married; his wife, with whom he had a son, was institutionalized at a psychiatric hospital in Mauer-Ohling, where she died on 9 June 1935.

The lengthy legal process dragged on, and it was not until March 1924 that Elisabeth was able to obtain a judicial separation. A sensational custody battle for their four children ensued. Originally the court granted Elisabeth custody of the two elder sons, while their younger son and daughter were to live with Otto. She is supposed to have prevented this either by presenting Otto with a house full of armed Socialists when he came to remove them, or else by threatening him with suicide should she have to give them up. In any event, Elisabeth ultimately retained custody of all four children. Elisabeth doted on her children when they were young, but her relationship with them deteriorated as they grew older. Rudolf, in accordance with her socialist views, was reportedly taken out of school and put to work in a factory. Elisabeth and her daughter Stephanie did not have a good relationship; she reportedly stated that she married her first husband based on the fact that her mother did not like him.

Elisabeth moved to the Hütteldorf district of Vienna and bought a villa in 1929, where she lived with Petznek for the next twenty years. She was at his side at Social Democratic marches and meetings, where she was accepted and accorded great respect. Leopold, however, due to his "haughty" character, was not welcome in aristocratic circles. In 1934 her husband and son made a legal motion to place her under a conservatorship on the grounds that she had squandered profits from the sale of the couple's property in numerous donations, made in order to join the Social Democrats. The motion was later dropped. Although divorce became legal in 1938, when Austria became part of Germany and adopted German law after the Anschluss, Elisabeth was not able to divorce her husband until after the end of the war.


In late 1933 Petznek was arrested and imprisoned by the Austrian government until July 1934. In 1944, he was arrested by the Nazis and sent to Dachau concentration camp until the camp was liberated by the Americans in March 1945. After the war he became the first President of the Austrian Federal Court of Audit. As Elisabeth renounced her official title of Archduchess to the House of Habsburg at the time of her first marriage, the new Habsburg Laws did not apply to her; she was allowed to stay in Austria and retain her personal possessions. She formally divorced Prince Otto in early 1948, and on 4 May 1948 she and Leopold married in a registry office in Vienna.

When Vienna was occupied by the Red Army, Elisabeth's villa was commandeered and then ransacked by Soviet soldiers. When Hütteldorf became part of the French occupied zone, the villa was occupied by General Bethouart; Elisabeth and Leopold were not allowed to return until 1955, when the Allied occupation ended. By then both were in poor health: Petznek died in July 1956 from a heart attack, while Elisabeth—who was confined to a wheelchair due to gout—bred German Shepherds, but became reclusive until her death in 1963.
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« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2021, 11:22:47 AM »

Juan Carlos and Sofia.  A marriage the Spanish press kept selling as great when they had been leading separate lives for 30 years.  



Already for 30 years  Shocked

But indeed nice addition
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