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CyrilSebastian

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« on: October 19, 2021, 02:09:58 AM »

Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV, who reigned from 1056 to 1105, was excommunicated by Pope Gregory VII three separate times and once by Pope Urban II. The first time was on February 22, 1076 over the Investure Controversy.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2021, 02:26:45 AM »

Judith of Flanders was the daughter of Charles the Bald, Holy Roman Emperor who reigned 875 to 877. In 861/862 she married Baldwin of Flanders. She did not have her father's permission. The Frankish bishops excommunicated her.
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« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2021, 08:55:15 AM »

https://en.wikipedia.org/...ed_by_the_Catholic_Church

9th Century
- Ingiltrud, wife of Boso the Elder, Count of Turin, was excommunicated by bishops in the empire of Charles the Baldat the direction of Pope Nicholas I after she left her husband for a secret lover and didn't respond to a summons to appear before the Synod of Milan in 860
- Judith of Flanders, Frankish princess and daughter of Charles the Bald was excommunicated by Frankish bishops after she married Baldwin I, Margrave of Flanders without her father's consent


10th century
- In 998, Robert II of France, who had been insisting on his right to appoint bishops, was ultimately forced to back down, and ultimately also to put aside his wife Bertha of Burgundy who had also been excommunicated. The stated reason was the degree of consanguinity between the two. Excommunicated by Pope Gregory V.They had the marriage annulled by Pope Sylvester II in 1000 and were reinstated.


11th century
- Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor was excommunicated 4 times in the 11th century (and would later be excommunicated a fifth time in the 12th century). He was excommunicated by Pope Gregory VII three separate times, and once more by Pope Urban II. The first was on 22 February 1076 over the Investiture Controversy. This excommunication was lifted on 28 January 1077 after Henry's public show of penitence known as the Road to Canossa. His second excommunication by Gregory was on 7 March 1080, and the third was in 1084 or 1085. Urban II excommunicated Henry in 1088.
- Harold II, King of England, for perhaps politically motivated reasons by Pope Alexander II in order to justify the invasion and takeover of the kingdom by William the Conqueror in 1066.
- Bolesław II the Generous, Duke of Poland, was excommunicated in 1080 after murdering the bishop Saint Stanislaus of Kraków.
- Philip I of France, king of France, for repudiating his marriage and remarrying, by Hugh, Archbishop of Lyon and later reaffirmed by Pope Urban II.


12th century
- Frederick I Barbarossa, Holy Roman Emperor, by Alexander III
- William I of Sicily, by Pope Adrian IV, while the king was waging war against the papal states and raiding pilgrims on their way to the tombs of the apostles.
- Ralph I, Count of Vermandois was said to have been excommunicated in 1142 by Bishop Saint Ivo of Chartres for repudiating his lawful wife and marrying another
- Roger II of Sicily, was excommunicated under the decrees of the Second Lateran Council in 1139
- Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, excommunicated by Pope Paschal II in 1106 for refusing to abjure his claim to imperial investitures, posthumously lifted in 1111. (Henry IV had already been excommunicated four times in the 11th century.)
- Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor by Jordan, Archbishop of Milan in 1116 and ratified by Pope Paschal II over the Investiture Controversy. He was excommunicated again by Pope Gelasius II and Pope Callistus II for setting up and supporting Antipope Gregory VIII. Received back into communion in 1122 or thereabouts.


13th century
- King John of England, excommunicated in 1208 by Pope Innocent III after refusing to accept Cardinal Stephen Langdon as the pope's choice for Archbishop of Canterbury. John relented in 1213 and was restored to communion.
- King Afonso II of Portugal, excommunicated in 1212 by Pope Honorius III for weakening the clergy and investing part of the large sums destined to the Catholic Church in the unification of the country. Afonso II promised to reconcile with the Church, however, he died in 1223 without making any serious attempt to do so.
- King Andrew II of Hungary, was excommunicated in 1231 after not following the points of Golden Bull of 1222, a seminal bill of rights, which contained new dispositions related to the tithe and hostile practices against the Jews and Muslims of the realm.
- Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, was excommunicated three times. The first time by Pope Gregory IX in 1227 for delaying his promise to begin the 5th Crusade; the excommunication was lifted in 1229. The same pope excommunicated him again in 1239 for making war against the Papal States, a censure rescinded by the new pope, Celestine IV, who died soon after. Frederick was again excommunicated by Pope Innocent IV at the First Council of Lyons in 1245. Frederick repented just before his death and was absolved of the censure in 1250.
- Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester was excommunicated in 1264 by Pope Clement IV for rebelling against King Henry III of England during the Second Barons' War. This was lifted in 1268.
- King Ladislaus IV of Hungary in 1279, by the pope's envoy Philip, for acting against the Catholic Church and living in a pagan way with the Cumans.
- James II of Aragon, in 1286 by Pope Boniface VIII for being crowned King of Sicily and thereby usurping a papal fief. His younger brother Frederick III of Sicily was excommunicated for the same reason in 1296.
- Eric VI of Denmark in 1298, by Pope Boniface VIII, for imprisoning Archbishop of Lund, Jens Grand.
- Byzantine Emperor Michael VIII Palaiologos of Constantinople, by Pope Martin IV
- Peter III of Aragon, by Pope Martin IV
- Raymond VI, Count of Toulouse was excommunicated by Pierre de Castelnau, legate of Pope Innocent III in 1207 for refusing to persecute Albigensians in his lands and even showing them signs of favour, such as allowing them to preach in front of him. He later did penance and joined in the crusade against the Albigensians, but was excommunicated again in 1209 when he went to Toulouse and tried to elude his obligations
- Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III in 1210 after he had invaded and taken over lands belonging to the Papal States as well as invading the Kingdom of Sicily that was under the Pope's suzerainty
- Alfonso IX of León, King of Leon and Galicia, was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III for marrying a near relative.


14th century
- Barnabň Visconti, tyrant of Milan, by Blessed Urban V in 1363. This was later rescinded after Barnabo restored castles he had seized and peace was concluded between him and the papal states. He was again excommunicated by Pope Gregory XI after he took over Reggio and other places that were feudatory to the Holy See in 1371. Barnabo reportedly forced the papal legates who brought him the bull of excommunication to eat the parchment on which it was written.
- Pedro the Cruel of Navarre was excommunicated by Blessed Urban V for his persecutions of clergy and cruelty.
- King Philip the Fair of France in 1303 by Pope Boniface VIII, for failing to respond adequately to a papal letter regarding Philip's effective rejection of the pope's temporal authority.
- Ladislaus Kán, Hungarian noble regent of the region of Transylvania that was excommunicated in 1309 by the pope's envoy Gentile Portino da Montefiore for not handing over the Holy Crown of Hungary, that was being kept illegally by him.
- Matthew III Csák, Hungarian noble that was excommunicated in 1311 by the pope's envoy Gentile, for not accepting the new King Charles I of Hungary.
- Robert the Bruce, King of Scots from 1306 to 1329, was excommunicated following his killing of John Comyn before the altar of the Greyfriars Church at Dumfries in 1306. His excommunication was lifted by Pope John XXII
- Joanna I of Naples in 1378 by Pope Urban VI for her support of Antipope Clement VII, support deemed heretical by Urban.



15th century
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16th century
- James IV of Scotland in 1513 for breaking the Treaty of Perpetual Peace with England.
- Henry VIII of England in 1533, officially promulgated on 17 December 1538 by Pope Paul III.
- Elizabeth I of England in 1570 by the papal bull Regnans in Excelsis.
- Henry IV of France and Navarre, who famously retaliated by "excommunicating" the Pope. He later converted to Catholicism and his excommunication was lifted on 17 September 1595.
- Alfonso I d'Este, Duke of Ferrara, by Julius II in 1510.
- Giovanni Bentivoglio, leader of Bologna, in 1506 by Julius II, while the pope was at war with him and leading an army to take Bologna.


17th century
- Mikołaj Sapieha in approximately 1625 by Pope Urban VIII; punishment for stealing a painting. The excommunication was lifted in 1634 to allow Sapieha to publicly oppose the suggested marriage of Władysław IV Vasa and Princess Elizabeth of Bohemia.
- Odoardo Farnese, Duke of Parma in 1641 by Pope Urban VIII during the Wars of Castro. He later reconciled with the Roman Catholic Church and was readmitted to the Sacraments.


18th century
- Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord, Bishop of Autun, by Pope Pius VI. Before his death, Talleyrand was reconciled with the Catholic Church


19th century
- Napoleon was excommunicated in the 1809 bull Quum memoranda by Pope Pius VII for ordering the annexation of Rome and a long period of anti-Papal orders. Before Napoleon's death, his excommunication was lifted and he received the last rites.
- King Victor Emmanuel II of Italy was excommunicated by Pope Pius IX when the king successfully waged war against the Papal States, resulting in limiting the pope to Vatican City. Before Victor Emmanuel II's death his excommunication was lifted and he was permitted to take the last rites.


20th century
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21st century
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2022, 10:46:44 PM »

On December 17, 1538 Pope Paul III announced the excommunication of King Henry VIII of England.       
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_V87vMb9As
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