Please read here on how to use images on RoyalDish. - Please read the RoyalDish message on board purpose and rules.
Images containing full nudity or sexual activities are strongly forbidden on RoyalDish.


Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Russian nobility  (Read 1420 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Curtains

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1684

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 3629





Ignore
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2022, 12:51:24 PM »

House of Golitsyn

The Golitsyn or Galitzine family was one of the largest princely of the noble houses in the Tsardom of Russia and Russian Empire. Among them were boyars, warlords, diplomats, generals (the Mikhailovichs), stewards, chamberlains, the richest men of Russia (the Alexeyevichs), and provincial landlords (the Vasilyevichs). Since 1694 Bolshiye Vyazyomy was one of the ancestral estates of the Golitsyns, but many others, like Arkhangelskoye Palace and Dubrovitsy near Podolsk, were owned by different branches or members of the family.

In the 1850s the Russian memoirist Filipp Vigel despaired: "So numerous are the Golitsyns that soon it will be impossible to mention any of them without the family tree at hand". Of the numerous branches of the princely family that existed in 1917, only one survived in the Soviet Union; all others were extinguished or forced into exile. The Bolsheviks arrested dozens of Golitsyns only to be shot or killed in the Gulag; dozens disappeared in the storm of the revolution and the Russian Civil War, and their fate remained unknown.


The family descends according to legend from a Lithuanian prince Jurgis (George), son of Patrikas and grandson of Narimantas, thus great-grandson of Gediminas (d. 1341), Grand Duke of Lithuania. After the extinction of the Korecki family in the 17th century, the Golitsyns claimed dynastic seniority in the House of Gediminas.Their surname in Russian: Голи́цын, tr. Golitsyn, IPA: [ɡɐˈlʲitsɨn] and cyrillic script is alternatively transliterated: Galitzine (French), Galitzin (German), Golicyn (Italian) or Golitsin (Spanish), etc. “Vir est Vis”, or "man himself is power”, is the Golitsyn family motto.

George immigrated to the court of Vasily I of Moscow and married Vasily's sister. His children and grandchildren, among them Vassian Patrikeyev, were considered premier Russian boyars. One of them, Prince Mikhail Ivanovich Bulgark (The Bulgarian), earned the nickname Golitsa (glove, geležěs in Old Lithuanian) for an iron (or strong leather) glove he wore in the Battle of Orsha in 1514. His son Yuri Mikhailovich Bulgakov continued with the family line Golytsin and his great-grandson Prince Vasily Golitsyn was claimant to the Russian throne during the Time of Troubles and went as an ambassador to Poland to offer the Russian crown to Prince Władysław; died in prison.


Prince (knyaz) Andrey Andreyevich Golitsyn (d. 1638), governor of Siberia (1633-35), was the ancestor of all existing princes Golitsyns. He had four sons, from whom four branches of the Golitsyn family descended:

Vasil (1618—1652) — branch Vassilyevich
Ivan (? — 1690) — branch Ivanovich, ended in 1751 (in a monastery)
Alexey (1632—1694) — branch Alexeevich
Michael (1639—1687) — branch Mikhailovich

The family produced many well-known statesmen and generals, among them Vasily, Boris, Dmitry and Nikolai Golitsyn, the last chairman of the Council of Ministers of the Russian Empire (Prime Minister of Imperial Russia), earning his living by repairing shoes and guarding public parks after the February revolution.



Interesting connection to my home state, Pennsylvania.  My husband and I were driving around PA last week and saw a “Prince Gallitzin State Park” as well as a town of Galltizin and another called Gallitzen Springs.

Here’s why:

Prince Gallitzin State Park is named for Father Demetrius Augustine Gallitzin. Born in Holland (Netherlands) on December 22, 1770, he was the only son of Prince Dimitri Alexievitch Gallitzin, Russian Ambassador to Holland, and his wife Amalia Von Schmettau Gallitzin.

https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/S...tePark/Pages/History.aspx

His father was closely connected with Catherine The Great, and purchased the library of Diderot for her, as well as sourcing many priceless works of art of The Hermitage.

https://en.m.wikipedia.or...ri_Alekseyevich_Gallitzin
Logged

"Some of it's magic, and some of it's tragic: but I had a good life, all the way." - Jimmy Buffet, America's premiere poet
Principessa

Most Exalted Member
*

Reputation: 2186

Offline Offline

Netherlands Netherlands

Posts: 34109


I am the Queen




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2022, 02:00:40 PM »

House of Golitsyn

The Golitsyn or Galitzine family was one of the largest princely of the noble houses in the Tsardom of Russia and Russian Empire. Among them were boyars, warlords, diplomats, generals (the Mikhailovichs), stewards, chamberlains, the richest men of Russia (the Alexeyevichs), and provincial landlords (the Vasilyevichs). Since 1694 Bolshiye Vyazyomy was one of the ancestral estates of the Golitsyns, but many others, like Arkhangelskoye Palace and Dubrovitsy near Podolsk, were owned by different branches or members of the family.

In the 1850s the Russian memoirist Filipp Vigel despaired: "So numerous are the Golitsyns that soon it will be impossible to mention any of them without the family tree at hand". Of the numerous branches of the princely family that existed in 1917, only one survived in the Soviet Union; all others were extinguished or forced into exile. The Bolsheviks arrested dozens of Golitsyns only to be shot or killed in the Gulag; dozens disappeared in the storm of the revolution and the Russian Civil War, and their fate remained unknown.


The family descends according to legend from a Lithuanian prince Jurgis (George), son of Patrikas and grandson of Narimantas, thus great-grandson of Gediminas (d. 1341), Grand Duke of Lithuania. After the extinction of the Korecki family in the 17th century, the Golitsyns claimed dynastic seniority in the House of Gediminas.Their surname in Russian: Голи́цын, tr. Golitsyn, IPA: [ɡɐˈlʲitsɨn] and cyrillic script is alternatively transliterated: Galitzine (French), Galitzin (German), Golicyn (Italian) or Golitsin (Spanish), etc. “Vir est Vis”, or "man himself is power”, is the Golitsyn family motto.

George immigrated to the court of Vasily I of Moscow and married Vasily's sister. His children and grandchildren, among them Vassian Patrikeyev, were considered premier Russian boyars. One of them, Prince Mikhail Ivanovich Bulgark (The Bulgarian), earned the nickname Golitsa (glove, geležěs in Old Lithuanian) for an iron (or strong leather) glove he wore in the Battle of Orsha in 1514. His son Yuri Mikhailovich Bulgakov continued with the family line Golytsin and his great-grandson Prince Vasily Golitsyn was claimant to the Russian throne during the Time of Troubles and went as an ambassador to Poland to offer the Russian crown to Prince Władysław; died in prison.


Prince (knyaz) Andrey Andreyevich Golitsyn (d. 1638), governor of Siberia (1633-35), was the ancestor of all existing princes Golitsyns. He had four sons, from whom four branches of the Golitsyn family descended:

Vasil (1618—1652) — branch Vassilyevich
Ivan (? — 1690) — branch Ivanovich, ended in 1751 (in a monastery)
Alexey (1632—1694) — branch Alexeevich
Michael (1639—1687) — branch Mikhailovich

The family produced many well-known statesmen and generals, among them Vasily, Boris, Dmitry and Nikolai Golitsyn, the last chairman of the Council of Ministers of the Russian Empire (Prime Minister of Imperial Russia), earning his living by repairing shoes and guarding public parks after the February revolution.



Interesting connection to my home state, Pennsylvania.  My husband and I were driving around PA last week and saw a “Prince Gallitzin State Park” as well as a town of Galltizin and another called Gallitzen Springs.

Here’s why:

Prince Gallitzin State Park is named for Father Demetrius Augustine Gallitzin. Born in Holland (Netherlands) on December 22, 1770, he was the only son of Prince Dimitri Alexievitch Gallitzin, Russian Ambassador to Holland, and his wife Amalia Von Schmettau Gallitzin.

https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/S...tePark/Pages/History.aspx

His father was closely connected with Catherine The Great, and purchased the library of Diderot for her, as well as sourcing many priceless works of art of The Hermitage.

https://en.m.wikipedia.or...ri_Alekseyevich_Gallitzin


Interesting!
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: