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Author Topic: Jordanian Royal News  (Read 960860 times)
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Macaw
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« Reply #30 on: May 12, 2007, 11:09:51 PM »

If enough people objected, they wouldn't occur, I imagine.   Thinking
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« Reply #31 on: May 12, 2007, 11:28:51 PM »

If enough people objected, they wouldn't occur, I imagine.   Thinking
It's also a matter of the influence of the objector. Honor killing is very common in the muslim and Druz society in Israel. The problem is that there is a hugh atmosphere of terror in these communities that women fear for their own lives and don't turn to the police even If they know detailes about the crime, because of It the police has no evidences so they can't do anything about It.

I wish that the powerfull religious leaders would object It publiclly.

Is there some sort of statistic about the numbers of honor killing before Abdulla's reign and now?
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« Reply #32 on: May 12, 2007, 11:44:57 PM »

All this is true.  Rania and her husband are obviously more pro-Western than many of their subjects and this makes their live perilous and their situation very different from European monarchs.[/;quote]
Opposing honour killings is not pro-Western, even the Prophet opposed such practices.

Quote from: Macaw
However, even accounting for this, it is a shame that restrictions on freedom of expression have, according to what I have read, become harsher during Abdullah's reign.  I don't think this is pro-Western (is it?) - maybe the ends justify the means but it is still, IMO, in the long term, a perilous course.
I'm not sure that's strictly true as Abdullah passed a law fairly recently (within the last year or so) ensuring freedom of the press. 

Quote from: Why doesn't he abolish the death penalty BTW - or at least enforce it for honor killings, which do not currently merit it?[/quote
I believe that would need to be approved by the legislature.

After all, you cannot demand democracy on the one hand and then insist that he pass laws without consulting parliament. That's the problem with so many ME countries.



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« Reply #33 on: May 12, 2007, 11:46:58 PM »

I know - this supports what I said.  R and A are more Western than their subjects, including people in government / parliament. 
Again, not strictly true. Those who opposed it were mainly Bedouin tribesmen, the Monarch's traditional support ground. The consequences of going against them could be quite severe.

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« Reply #34 on: May 12, 2007, 11:49:36 PM »

Apologies for the previous posting, I was trying to do multiple quotes and it appears to have gone badly wrong! Can you all still read it? Or should I have an attempt at re-writing it?
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Macaw
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« Reply #35 on: May 12, 2007, 11:56:12 PM »

I know - this supports what I said.  R and A are more Western than their subjects, including people in government / parliament. 
Again, not strictly true. Those who opposed it were mainly Bedouin tribesmen, the Monarch's traditional support ground. The consequences of going against them could be quite severe.



I get that.  It's part of what I mean by saying that their values are not necessarily aligned with those of their subjects; if the Bedouin, their traditional supporters, don't support them, then it would be difficult.
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Macaw
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« Reply #36 on: May 13, 2007, 12:01:31 AM »

Apologies for the previous posting, I was trying to do multiple quotes and it appears to have gone badly wrong! Can you all still read it? Or should I have an attempt at re-writing it?

No worries...I don't even attempt such manoeuvres.

But on this issue of press freedom...well, we could also say A. has taken his own sweet time doing anything about it, if it's taken several years into his reign for him to ease it. 

But his Wiki entry is frankly pretty negative IMO: 

"King Abdullah is often criticized for ruling with an autocratic style, imposing limitations on basic freedoms of speech, press, and the right to protest."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdullah_II_of_Jordan
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« Reply #37 on: May 13, 2007, 12:01:53 AM »

But then the Bedouins tend to be very traditional anyway. Their views are probably different to those of other Jordanians.
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« Reply #38 on: May 13, 2007, 12:03:16 AM »

From my point of view Rania is a wonderful representative for a progressive Jordan, but I wonder how traditionalists feel about the queen's public and modern role?  I heard that she was called "Mrs Handbag" or something like that because of her taste for expensive designer clothes.  

Sometimes it seems jarring to see images of the Jordanian royals with their people. They really seem to inhabit different worlds.  This is why I wonder about the stability of the monarchy.
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« Reply #39 on: May 13, 2007, 12:03:34 AM »

Rania and Abdullah attended the the Jordan International Rally at the Dead Sea today.
http://legacyeditorial.ge...7c0%7c0&p=7&tag=1

Amman, May 12, (Petra) Their Majesties King Abdullah II and Queen Rania Al Abdullah on Saturday visited one of the sites of Jordan Rally 2007, organized at the Dead Sea area, to get assured about conditions of the participants in the rally.

King Abdullah listened to a briefing by HRH Prince Faisal Bin AL-Hussein on activities of the rally and on Jordanís preparations to host the international rally next year.

During the visit, King Abdullah also talked to Jordanian drivers competing in the rally, Amjad Frah and Amir al-Najjar and wished them all success to accomplish distinguished results in the rally.
Competition is high between Najjar, Frah and Khaled al-Qawasmi (UAE) to win the title of the rally. Prince Faisal will announce the winner tonight.
http://petra.gov.jo/nepras/2007/May/12/10000.htm
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« Reply #40 on: May 13, 2007, 12:07:30 AM »

From my point of view Rania is a wonderful representative for a progressive Jordan, but I wonder how traditionalists feel about the queen's public and modern role?  I heard that she was called "Mrs Handbag" or something like that because of her taste for expensive designer clothes.  

Sometimes it seems jarring to see images of the Jordanian royals with their people. They really seem to inhabit different worlds.  This is why I wonder about the stability of the monarchy.

In this day and age, it could be questionable anywhere, but Jordan has been an oasis of stability in a volatile area for a long time now, and maybe the alternative there could be frightening.
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« Reply #41 on: May 13, 2007, 12:09:41 AM »

From my point of view Rania is a wonderful representative for a progressive Jordan, but I wonder how traditionalists feel about the queen's public and modern role?  I heard that she was called "Mrs Handbag" or something like that because of her taste for expensive designer clothes.  

Sometimes it seems jarring to see images of the Jordanian royals with their people. They really seem to inhabit different worlds.  This is why I wonder about the stability of the monarchy.
The comments about her spending and the hnadbag tag actually came from wealthy upper-class Jordanians. The usual speculation for this is that Rania's Palestinian background angered them far more than anything else.

I've always believed much of her wardrobe was borrowed and she actually confirmed this in an interview last year while in the US.

As for "excessive" spending, it's commonplace in the JRF; Noor did it, Alia did it. It's nothing new. Moreover compared to other monarchies I personally think the Jordanians are very tame moneywise.

I think the stability of the monarchy is a big issue. In terms of their subjects they always seem very humble when meeting them and are always well-received regardless of where they go. I'm not sure how much you follow them but I can honestly say I've never seen photos from any of their trips that suggest otherwise.  
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« Reply #42 on: May 13, 2007, 12:33:42 AM »

It's interesting that wealthy Jordanians would criticize Rania, I figured that opposition would come from the poor. 

We don't hear very much about Jordan in the US, however Abdullah did visit recently (within the last year anyway).  I listened to an interview that he gave and I was impressed by his intelligence and diplomacy.  He hinted that blowback from Iraq was making his situation more difficult in Jordan.    I felt that he was basically a decent person, who was trying to keep Jordan from falling apart.  If he did curb civil liberties then perhaps they posed a real threat to the state?

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« Reply #43 on: May 13, 2007, 02:15:03 AM »

It's interesting that wealthy Jordanians would criticize Rania, I figured that opposition would come from the poor. 

We don't hear very much about Jordan in the US, however Abdullah did visit recently (within the last year anyway).  I listened to an interview that he gave and I was impressed by his intelligence and diplomacy.  He hinted that blowback from Iraq was making his situation more difficult in Jordan.    I felt that he was basically a decent person, who was trying to keep Jordan from falling apart.  If he did curb civil liberties then perhaps they posed a real threat to the state?


I think your assessment of Abdullah is fairly accurate. Jordan is in a very tough spot, both geographically and spiritually and imo Abdullah does his best to address that.

I believe after the Amman bombngs there was some sort of crackdown, but I'm not certain of the details.
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Macaw
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« Reply #44 on: May 13, 2007, 02:59:41 AM »

From my point of view Rania is a wonderful representative for a progressive Jordan, but I wonder how traditionalists feel about the queen's public and modern role?  I heard that she was called "Mrs Handbag" or something like that because of her taste for expensive designer clothes.  

Sometimes it seems jarring to see images of the Jordanian royals with their people. They really seem to inhabit different worlds.  This is why I wonder about the stability of the monarchy.


As for "excessive" spending, it's commonplace in the JRF; Noor did it, Alia did it. It's nothing new. Moreover compared to other monarchies I personally think the Jordanians are very tame moneywise.


They should be - Jordan is a poor country that relies a lot on foreign aid.  This is not the case with European countries.  Flaunting their wealth might be very risky.
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