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Author Topic: Jordanian Royal News  (Read 739829 times)
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genever

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« Reply #3945 on: May 11, 2018, 08:26:38 PM »



Elegant outfit, simple and pretty.
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Amina

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« Reply #3946 on: May 12, 2018, 09:40:59 PM »

Is it just me or is the king and queens son AWFULLY good looking? That smile!  The crinkles in the eyes!

One of the best smiles I’ve seen on anyone.

Yes he is... Smiley  He has good genes.  Rania is gorgeous.  All her and Abdullah's kids are so good looking.
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Chandrasekhi

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« Reply #3947 on: May 13, 2018, 12:00:11 PM »

I know that Jordan is suffering from very bad economic crisis lately but sound that the situation is worst than i thought Thinking


  Hungry Jordan vents anger at prodigal royals

When Queen Rania visited the Taj Mall in Amman for lunch in 2014, it was crowded with members of the Jordanian upper crust, drinking frappés as they shopped at royal favourites Burberry and Armani.

Now the hulking glass shopping centre is half-empty, its customers driven away by a crippling economic crisis that has sparked an outpouring of fury. Jordan’s royal family and glamorous queen are in the firing line.

“We’re suffering, and the royal family don’t give a crap,” said Asma, a 19-year-old shop assistant, as she stared into an empty store in the Taj Mall. “They have to reduce their spending and their costs, because they have to at least look like they’re with the people. But they don’t.”

The turmoil of the Middle East is encroaching on the carefully guarded stability of this key ally of the West. Its constitutional monarchy survived the 2011 Arab Spring, but seven years on the omens have changed.

Though Jordan appears peaceful and prosperous, economists say it is hurtling towards economic disaster, all the faster because of its reliance on foreign aid.

An economic downturn became a crisis after Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait — hit by falling oil prices — failed to renew a £2.6bn aid programme last year.

America, which sees Jordan as a vital buffer of stability, has increased its funding but the government deficit has reached £757m, and the national debt is 95% of GDP, up from 71% in 2011.

Last month, the government increased taxes on 169 commodities, including flour, causing the price of bread to double. Protests broke out immediately. Videos on social media and independent news websites show gatherings of hundreds of people across the country chanting: “The people of Jordan are on fire, all because of the rise in prices.”

“Give it two or three months,” one local commentator, who did not want to be named, said last week. “It’s getting extremely volatile, and we don’t know what the consequences will be. There’s no limit to what people can do when they’re hungry.”

In increasingly loud voices, Jordanians are accusing the government of corruption and incompetence. More quietly, they are starting to break a strict taboo: accusing the royal family of ignoring the crisis, and of flaunting their lavish lifestyles as ordinary Jordanians suffer.

The queen last year wore clothes valued at £236,000 during public appearances, according to a website monitoring royal fashion. “Everything she wears is so expensive,” said one person living in Amman. “People see the way other royals, like Kate Middleton, dress in high street brands, and they compare it. It’s not a good look for her with the economy as it is.”

Hussein, who took the throne at 17 in 1953 and ruled through tumultuous times until his death in 1999, created a constitutional monarchy that provides for elections but gives his son, Abdullah, extensive influence over policy making. The country is firmly under the royal thumb.

Abdullah has published papers calling for a more inclusive, pluralistic political system, yet those charged with “disrespecting” him can face three years in jail. Since 2016, independent press coverage of the royal family has been in effect banned after the government prohibited local outlets from publishing any news about it except for statements directly from the royal court.

The 56-year-old king and his family are publicly revered. Almost all criticism happens in private. [...]

Pictures of Abdullah, whose mother, Princess Muna al-Hussein, was born in Chelmondiston, Suffolk, adorn shopfronts and offices. [...]

Yet the criticism of the royals, analysts say, is growing across the social strata. “It is modern women and men who are saying this as well as the working class,” said a local journalist. “The king and queen are both educated, they’re westernised, but somehow they don’t understand this.”

Jordan’s large middle class has been severely hit by the economic crisis. Although education and literacy are among the best in the region, almost a third of young people are unemployed. Rents in Amman are steep, making it difficult for them to live independently.

Asma, like most of her friends, wants to leave the country. Though she is from a well-to-do family, she struggles to get by on the £280 a month she earns working seven days a week as a shop assistant to finance her degree. “They’ve basically managed to wipe out the middle class in a year,” she said. “Why would I ever stay here?”

A third of Jordan’s population lives below the poverty line for at least a quarter of the year, and has been hit hardest. “We’ve been giving people bread because they can’t afford it,” said Majid, a baker, as he dusted off his floury hands in a souk just a few miles from the Taj Mall. “People are going hungry.”

At a nearby barber shop, Ahmed, 37, sat drinking coffee — passing the time without customers. Three months ago, his electricity bill doubled.

He believes corruption lies at the heart of Jordan’s problems. Last year, it was ranked 59 out of 180 on Transparency International’s corruption perceptions index — below Rwanda and Saudi Arabia. “I know the government is corrupt,” Ahmed said, lighting a cigarette. “I’m angry, and I feel this is an injustice but as an ordinary citizen I can’t speak out because this will cause me problems. People are willing to accept corruption if we have security. I know for sure the government steals, but I can’t do anything because I don’t want Jordan to be like Syria.”

That fear of contagion from the war raging next door is a powerful force for stability. But analysts say economic reform is vital. Much of the state’s budget goes on salaries and pensions in the bloated public sector.

“The fundamental problem is that the government is too large and the spending is not directed towards productive activities,” said Marwan Muasher, a former Jordanian foreign minister and vice-president of the Carnegie Endowment, a Washington think tank.

  “We should have seen it coming. We have relied on the rentier system and foreign aid for too long and we find ourselves in a crisis that we don’t know how to get out of. People are angry because there’s no end in sight. Every time that the government has an economic crisis, it is them who are being asked to pay the price. You can’t ask people to keep giving sacrifices without giving them a voice. This is what caused the Arab Spring in the first place.”
https://amp.reddit.com/r/...r_at_prodigal_royals_the/
Star Rita, I just came across your brilliant post. So it seems that Nero plays his fiddle while Rome burns. How does a country service a 95% debt:GDP if it is a recipient of foreign aid which the Trump administration is threatening to decrease significantly (though I suspect the Generals will scupper that plan). I had goosebumps reading that article. South Africa's current debt levels are 50% (higher if one takes into account state owned enterprise debt)  courtesy of our showerhead ex-president and his looting cohorts, bloating of the public sector under his watch and wasteful expenditure. The levels of unemployment among the youth is staggering.  Strategists/futurists at the Institute for Security Studies have been warning for years that drastic intervention is required if we want to avoid a revolution, the kind we might have in the early 1990s had the negotiated solution not been reached.  We are not reliant on foreign aid so in some cases Jordan's situation seems more dire and it seems to be heading into a perfect storm.

During all of this Rania will wear the height of fashion, botox her face even more (is that even possible Cry) and the good looking crown prince and his mega-rich buddies will race out to the desert for a YUPPIE expedition. In the unlikely event the Trump administration cuts foreign aid to Jordan, he can always ask his buddies to leverage their social networks to make-up the shortfall.
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Rita

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« Reply #3948 on: May 17, 2018, 11:56:03 PM »

you are welcome Chandrasekhi Star
i am not an expert but in my humble opinion the problem in Jordan the government (the ppl whos in charge) didn't/don't have any plans to turn those aids to very successful and profitable projects that could help and country economy and at least minimales  the depend on the foreigen aids.
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« Reply #3949 on: May 20, 2018, 04:49:50 PM »

Princess Imane back in Jordan
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Rita

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« Reply #3950 on: May 27, 2018, 12:09:36 AM »

May 24, 2018, King Abdullah II, Queen Rania, Crown Prince Hussein and Princess Salma of Jordan attended the national celebrations of the 72nd anniversary of Jordan's Independence Day held at Raghadan Palace in Amman. The country won its full independence on May 25, 1946, following the end of the British mandate.





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Rita

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« Reply #3951 on: June 03, 2018, 02:59:07 AM »

well it was a question of time Sad

Mass Protests in Jordan Despite King's Decision to Cancel Fuel Price Hikes
Despite decision by the government, upon orders by King Abdullah, to cancel significant hikes in the prices of fuel and electricity driven by the rising prices of crude on international markets, riots and protests were reported in almost every corner of the country according to local coverage and social media posts, including the official news agency.
Road closures, burning tyres, chanting anti-government slogans, calling on the government to step down and parking cars in the middle of main veins in Amman and several government were recorded, with reports of police intervention to bring the snowballing situation under control.
https://www.albawaba.com/...fuel-prices-hikes-1140074

Jordanians in third night of tax rise protests
Protests in Jordan against tax rises and austerity measures - the biggest protests there for years - have entered their third consecutive night.
Police fired tear gas and blocked roads in the capital Amman to stop protesters getting close to the cabinet office.
https://www.bbc.com/news/...orld-middle-east-44345136

Thousands of Jordanians protest government's austerity plan
AMMAN, Jordan –  Several thousand Jordanians have joined the largest protest yet against the government's recent austerity measures, including price hikes and planned tax increases.
http://www.foxnews.com/wo...ments-austerity-plan.html

Clashes rage in Jordan despite price hike freeze
Police in the Jordanian capital Amman have clashed with protesters as calls are growing for resignation of the government amid public anger over price hikes.
http://www.presstv.com/De...g-Abdullah-II-price-hikes

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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #3952 on: June 03, 2018, 03:14:34 AM »

well it was a question of time Sad

Mass Protests in Jordan Despite King's Decision to Cancel Fuel Price Hikes
Despite decision by the government, upon orders by King Abdullah, to cancel significant hikes in the prices of fuel and electricity driven by the rising prices of crude on international markets, riots and protests were reported in almost every corner of the country according to local coverage and social media posts, including the official news agency.
Road closures, burning tyres, chanting anti-government slogans, calling on the government to step down and parking cars in the middle of main veins in Amman and several government were recorded, with reports of police intervention to bring the snowballing situation under control.
https://www.albawaba.com/...fuel-prices-hikes-1140074

Jordanians in third night of tax rise protests
Protests in Jordan against tax rises and austerity measures - the biggest protests there for years - have entered their third consecutive night.
Police fired tear gas and blocked roads in the capital Amman to stop protesters getting close to the cabinet office.
https://www.bbc.com/news/...orld-middle-east-44345136

Thousands of Jordanians protest government's austerity plan
AMMAN, Jordan –  Several thousand Jordanians have joined the largest protest yet against the government's recent austerity measures, including price hikes and planned tax increases.
http://www.foxnews.com/wo...ments-austerity-plan.html

Clashes rage in Jordan despite price hike freeze
Police in the Jordanian capital Amman have clashed with protesters as calls are growing for resignation of the government amid public anger over price hikes.
http://www.presstv.com/De...g-Abdullah-II-price-hikes



Wow Rita.  That sounds very bad and very precarious for the royal family.
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Rita

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« Reply #3953 on: June 03, 2018, 03:26:36 AM »



Wow Rita.  That sounds very bad and very precarious for the royal family.


for a while now situation wasn't very nice for ppl in Jordan but they were ignored and moreover the rise of taxes and prices continued in a total disregard of critical condition of normal citizen wich is a stupidity i don't know whos the responsable look like the government  had amazingly failed but also Addullah is the head of state and the real ruler he should did something alooong time ago
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Rita

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« Reply #3954 on: June 04, 2018, 03:05:01 AM »

Princess Reem Ali and Princess Jalila Bint Ali Bin Al Hussein visited Tkiyet Um Ali today, where they participated in serving Iftar meals to more than 1,800 people at Mawa’ed Al Rahman.


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Rita

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« Reply #3955 on: June 04, 2018, 03:07:53 AM »

Jordan's King Abdullah expected to ask PM to resign: political sources
AMMAN (Reuters) - Jordan’s King Abdullah was expected on Monday to ask Prime Minister Hani Mulki to resign in a bid to soothe widespread anger over economic policies that has sparked the largest protests in several years, political sources said.
The dismissal of Mulki was demanded in a series of protests against IMF-backed tax increases that have shaken the kingdom. The sources said King Abdullah had ordered Mulki for an audience in his palace later on Monday.
https://www.reuters.com/a...cal-sources-idUSKCN1IZ0ZN

King Abdullah of Jordan blames regional turmoil for economic crisis amid protests
The King of Jordan has blamed regional turmoil for worsening economic woes that have sparked angry protests.
State media quoted King Abdullah as telling Prime Minister Hani Mulki and many members of his government the situation was not of Jordan's own making.
Jordan's government has prompted anger by proposing new laws to increase income taxes by at least 5% and corporation tax by between 20% and 40%.
It is the latest in a series of economic measures since the country secured a $723m three-year overdraft from the International Monetary Fund in 201
https://news.sky.com/stor...is-amid-protests-11393435
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #3956 on: June 04, 2018, 03:57:27 AM »

So things continue to deteriorate in Jordan.

I guess this has been brewing for some time but blaming “regional turmoil” doesn’t seem like a good idea to me. Taking a stance of personal responsibility might work better, but I could be wrong.
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Rita

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« Reply #3957 on: June 05, 2018, 12:27:31 AM »

So things continue to deteriorate in Jordan.

I guess this has been brewing for some time but blaming “regional turmoil” doesn’t seem like a good idea to me. Taking a stance of personal responsibility might work better, but I could be wrong.
they are asking for PM head and even now King gives it to them there still riots in the streets and in more than one city.
 Jordan is a poor country and there is no doubt that the regional turmoil makes it worst for them,i mean look how many refugees live in Jordan however blaming only that is not right imho,in the end Jordan has been always depending on foreign aids  and never they did any real effors to make their economy stronger or at least an economy which can survive without US,Gulf aids so King should takes notes from these events and start to think in real plans for his country economy  they can not go forever like that with any intenational  incident the whole living of a country and it ppl is at risk
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 12:35:53 AM by Rita » Logged

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« Reply #3958 on: June 05, 2018, 12:55:11 AM »

So things continue to deteriorate in Jordan.

I guess this has been brewing for some time but blaming “regional turmoil” doesn’t seem like a good idea to me. Taking a stance of personal responsibility might work better, but I could be wrong.
they are asking for PM head and even now King gives it to them there still riots in the streets and in more than one city.
 Jordan is a poor country and there is no doubt that the regional turmoil makes it worst for them,i mean look how many refugees live in Jordan however blaming only that is not right imho,in the end Jordan has been always depending on foreign aids  and never they did any real effors to make their economy stronger or at least an economy which can survive without US,Gulf aids so King should takes notes from these events and start to think in real plans for his country economy  they can not go forever like that with any intenational  incident the whole living of a country and it ppl is at risk

Yes. Angry people who don’t know how they’re going to afford to eat or pay rent are not always rational, so a solid plan for jobs and economic growth  seems like a good idea. Otherwise they might not stop with the PM.
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« Reply #3959 on: June 05, 2018, 01:24:48 AM »

So things continue to deteriorate in Jordan.

I guess this has been brewing for some time but blaming “regional turmoil” doesn’t seem like a good idea to me. Taking a stance of personal responsibility might work better, but I could be wrong.
they are asking for PM head and even now King gives it to them there still riots in the streets and in more than one city.
 Jordan is a poor country and there is no doubt that the regional turmoil makes it worst for them,i mean look how many refugees live in Jordan however blaming only that is not right imho,in the end Jordan has been always depending on foreign aids  and never they did any real effors to make their economy stronger or at least an economy which can survive without US,Gulf aids so King should takes notes from these events and start to think in real plans for his country economy  they can not go forever like that with any intenational  incident the whole living of a country and it ppl is at risk

Yes. Angry people who don’t know how they’re going to afford to eat or pay rent are not always rational, so a solid plan for jobs and economic growth  seems like a good idea. Otherwise they might not stop with the PM.
that's the real challenge now,as the PM is gone i think now it will be intersting to see if the population will hear the King calls to calm down,
the most intriguing was Crown Prince absence i mean he is the second in charge and a young man, also they always give us the impression he is very close to the streets wouldn't be good to see him out meeting those ppl? especially they (most of them) are young,wouldn't be good to see him attending those mettings with his father? especially he is groomed to be the next King and he might find himself in same situation in futur...
intriguing also the absence of the Queen she is always attending meetings with her husband sometime her presence is irrelevant but still she is there,now she vanished,she always out there talking to ppl and give the impression she is listened and respected by the ppl now i think is the perfect opportunity to use that baggages?...seems to me King is left alone
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 03:14:04 AM by Rita » Logged

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