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Author Topic: Plantations of the Old South  (Read 6458 times)
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Aubiette

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« Reply #45 on: June 27, 2020, 05:35:27 PM »

Iím surprised the descendants of slaves havenít been able to claim hefty reparations.

Considering we are still fighting to have slavery taught properly in schools and to get rid of confederate monuments, Iím not going hold my breath.

I know this threat is about the US but I'm offering some knowledge of reparations and compensations from when the UK outlawed the slave trade and slave ownership

The compensations the government paid to slave-owning families was so vast that it was only paid off in 2015. Almost 200 years after slavery was completely outlawed in the UK. The money to pay this came from taxpayers. So any UK taxpayer who paid tax before 2015 paid towards those compensations (I doubt many would have been aware of this).

Sadly, and as you can probably imagine, no compensations or reparations were ever paid to any of those formerly enslaved.

I know it's hard to compare, and the UK has a long, long way to go in terms of recognising its past, acknowledging it and even addressing it, but it may give you some insight relating to how or why the US has failed to offer any compensations or reparations.

Well you said it perfectly. I have no intentions of paying reparations for something I had nothing to do with, nor my grandparents, nor theirs. Not to mention that those who couldíve benefited are no longer with us and many other reasons/issues.

I know, my 3rd great-granduncle sacrificed his health as an engineer on Underground Railroad.  His wife was equally as tough when mobs would descend on their house.

Thatís awesome, not the health sacrifice of course, but the help/work itself.
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freethespoon

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« Reply #46 on: June 27, 2020, 06:15:30 PM »

God bless your ancestor, Genegal.   Star

The Underground Railroad is a period of history I never tire of learning about.  The bravery and laser sharp moral compass of all involved: it restores faith in humanity.
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #47 on: June 27, 2020, 08:02:05 PM »

You know what would be a fantastic way to pay reparations?

Pump money into HBCUs, teach slavery PROPERLY in public schools, take down public Confederate monuments, evenly distribute state taxes to all schools instead of them just going to schools in certain communities, and stop over policing black communities.

That would be a great place to start.

Those are great ideas, GGMM.  My work group wanted to do something special for Juneteenth as we were given time off that day.  So someone found the Thurgood Marshall College Fund and we did a fundraiser.  The amount raised isnít going to put them on easy street, but it hopefully will help a bit.
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Lady Liebe

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« Reply #48 on: June 27, 2020, 08:11:25 PM »

If you ever are near Cincinnati, OH visit the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

You will not only be educated in history, but also modern day abolition - the ongoing fight against human trafficking.

https://www.freedomcenter.org




« Last Edit: June 27, 2020, 08:18:47 PM by Lady Liebe » Logged

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freethespoon

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« Reply #49 on: June 27, 2020, 08:14:31 PM »

If you ever are near Cincinnati, OH visit the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

You will not only be educated in history, but also modern day abolition - the ongoing fight against human trafficking.

https://www.freedomcenter.org


I'm trying to organize a road trip for me and the kids this summer.  Thank you for the suggestion.  Star
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Lady Liebe

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« Reply #50 on: June 27, 2020, 08:43:49 PM »

You're welcome Spoonie.

Growing up abolition and the underground railroad was woven throughout my state's history curriculum. As I child I know my mom took us to one of the homes that was a station on the underground railroad - and where I sit now is twenty miles or so from where former slaves went by boat to Canada. I knew a lot when I visited, but came out knowing so much more.

Cincinnati is a pretty cool city to visit.
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periwinkle

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« Reply #51 on: June 27, 2020, 08:45:15 PM »

I remember when I was a kid I thought there was a literal railroad underground and I couldn't wait to visit it lol. There is a place in Philadelphia called Eastern state penitentiary that has exhibits about incarceration in the US and how it affects black and brown people mostly as a way to control bodies after slavery was made illegal. We went two years ago and bought a copy of Bryan Stevenson's book there called Just Mercy. There is a film on it now although I haven't seen it. Now we want to go to Alabama and the lynching museum he created there and then over to New Orleans to eat too much and visit the Whitney Plantation although we have backed off of the idea for this year obviously. There is so much to learn about what was really happening at the same time they were telling us something else was happening like it's all just a part of the economy. I have a slave holding ancestor and while I don't feel personally responsible for someone's actions 200 years before I was born I sure do feel responsible for being a part of the solution and making sure my kids understand their role although they may already do that better than us in many cases.
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GoodGollyMissMolly

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« Reply #52 on: June 27, 2020, 09:12:22 PM »

I remember when I was a kid I thought there was a literal railroad underground and I couldn't wait to visit it lol. There is a place in Philadelphia called Eastern state penitentiary that has exhibits about incarceration in the US and how it affects black and brown people mostly as a way to control bodies after slavery was made illegal. We went two years ago and bought a copy of Bryan Stevenson's book there called Just Mercy. There is a film on it now although I haven't seen it. Now we want to go to Alabama and the lynching museum he created there and then over to New Orleans to eat too much and visit the Whitney Plantation although we have backed off of the idea for this year obviously. There is so much to learn about what was really happening at the same time they were telling us something else was happening like it's all just a part of the economy. I have a slave holding ancestor and while I don't feel personally responsible for someone's actions 200 years before I was born I sure do feel responsible for being a part of the solution and making sure my kids understand their role although they may already do that better than us in many cases.

Iíve been to the lynching musuem- itís down right painful. Especially when you seen the ages of young children or entire families.
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thecrownjewelthief

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« Reply #53 on: June 28, 2020, 02:06:33 AM »

You know what would be a fantastic way to pay reparations?

Pump money into HBCUs, teach slavery PROPERLY in public schools, take down public Confederate monuments, evenly distribute state taxes to all schools instead of them just going to schools in certain communities, and stop over policing black communities.

That would be a great place to start.

Great thoughts Star HBCU underfunding especially is something that I'd love to see action taken on, and schools as well. My sister is a teacher in a low-income school in a big city, and it's awful how underfunded the majority-minority schools while the wealthy schools get more city funding (and have the ability to fundraise tons in their neighborhoods), especially when her students need resources more.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #54 on: July 27, 2020, 02:21:04 AM »

Forks of Cypress Plantation in Florence, Alabama   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeTWJK-SGtw
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #55 on: July 28, 2020, 02:18:46 AM »

Forks of Cypress Plantation in Florence, Alabama   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeTWJK-SGtw
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #56 on: August 06, 2020, 02:00:00 AM »

The Live Oaks of Boone Hall Plantation were planted in 1743.   
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/647379590
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ConnieBrooks

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« Reply #57 on: August 06, 2020, 02:40:45 AM »

The Live Oaks of Boone Hall Plantation were planted in 1743.    
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/647379590

Live oaks are unusual trees. Although part of the oak family, they are evergreen instead of deciduous: Called "live" because they retain green leaves throughout the winter. Late in the spring, they shed their leaves and immediately put out new leaves.

They also grow very old and large, but they have a branching, twisting, spreading shape. This made them valuable in building wooden ships, since the natural branching meant that they made excellent natural joins.

The builder who landscaped my house made the poor decision to plant a live oak next to the street. I regularly have to cut back its branches, since left to itself they would practically run along the ground.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_fusiformis
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