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Author Topic: Royal Last Names?  (Read 18860 times)
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Principessa

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« Reply #75 on: July 24, 2019, 09:59:19 PM »

A Dutch friend of mine has her name hyphenated.

Ah, that is something more common over here. My mom was know for a long time as: Mrs. First name Married last name - Maidenname
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jolene

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« Reply #76 on: July 24, 2019, 10:21:08 PM »

A Dutch friend of mine has her name hyphenated.

Ah, that is something more common over here. My mom was know for a long time as: Mrs. First name Married last name - Maidenname
That's exactly what she did.  Thumb up
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #77 on: July 25, 2019, 03:38:28 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
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Harley
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« Reply #78 on: July 25, 2019, 10:10:15 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?

It must be a local thing. I live in Denmark and I have never heard of that custom before.
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fairy

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« Reply #79 on: July 25, 2019, 02:31:55 PM »

With growing feminism and with equally growing divorce rates, women are looking for options differing from the old traditional ones:
switching from father's name to husband's name smacks too much of the old "changing of possession".
And who the heck wants to keep their exes' name? (well apart from Tessy obviously).
As society changes, so do attitudes and customs and I will very much advise my daughters to keep their names, even though I myself changed mine upon marriage. (well I make an exception should they want to marry a Rockefeller, in that case they can hyphenate  Wink)
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« Reply #80 on: July 25, 2019, 05:59:21 PM »

With growing feminism and with equally growing divorce rates, women are looking for options differing from the old traditional ones:
switching from father's name to husband's name smacks too much of the old "changing of possession".
And who the heck wants to keep their exes' name? (well apart from Tessy obviously).
As society changes, so do attitudes and customs and I will very much advise my daughters to keep their names, even though I myself changed mine upon marriage. (well I make an exception should they want to marry a Rockefeller, in that case they can hyphenate  Wink)

Itís such a pain in the ass too. The federal government has my married name but I still havenít changed it in all the million and one places out there that need to be...4 years married in October  Blush
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #81 on: July 26, 2019, 03:32:55 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?

It must be a local thing. I live in Denmark and I have never heard of that custom before.
     
 
When Mother's first cousin in the Slovak Republic writes, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Could this have been a Hungarian custom from centuries ago?
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fairy

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« Reply #82 on: July 26, 2019, 09:46:45 AM »

I have many hungarian friends and acquaintances but never heard of it as a tradition.. perhaps your relative uses her maiden name inside her Family to make sure everybody knows who she is?
E.G. I had to call and contact several old family relations and I used my maiden name as my married name would not have been familiar with the people and it was easier that way.
I also used my maiden name lately when I emailed with old school pals for a reunion.
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« Reply #83 on: July 26, 2019, 12:19:18 PM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
No, it's not customary in Slovakia to use your maiden name when you are married, I haven't seen it even in private correspondence. Same for Hungary, once you are married you use your married name unless you keep your maiden name.
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« Reply #84 on: July 27, 2019, 03:55:38 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
No, it's not customary in Slovakia to use your maiden name when you are married, I haven't seen it even in private correspondence. Same for Hungary, once you are married you use your married name unless you keep your maiden name.
     
 
Mother and her first cousin did not keep their maiden names. They may just use the maiden name in mail correspondence.
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Olya

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« Reply #85 on: July 28, 2019, 02:31:49 PM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
No, it's not customary in Slovakia to use your maiden name when you are married, I haven't seen it even in private correspondence. Same for Hungary, once you are married you use your married name unless you keep your maiden name.
     
 
Mother and her first cousin did not keep their maiden names. They may just use the maiden name in mail correspondence.

It's definitely not customary in Europe (Western or Eastern). Seems they do it for their personal reason.
You could ask them (and then tell us more to enlihgten us!).
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #86 on: July 29, 2019, 03:41:16 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
No, it's not customary in Slovakia to use your maiden name when you are married, I haven't seen it even in private correspondence. Same for Hungary, once you are married you use your married name unless you keep your maiden name.
     
 
Mother and her first cousin did not keep their maiden names. They may just use the maiden name in mail correspondence.

It's definitely not customary in Europe (Western or Eastern). Seems they do it for their personal reason.
You could ask them (and then tell us more to enlihgten us!).

     
 
Olya, Mother and her cousin use their maiden name in mail correspondence. Legally they use their husbands' surnames.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #87 on: September 24, 2021, 01:36:03 AM »

The House of Romania is the House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. The name sounds German. That is because Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen was a principality in Germany.
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