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Author Topic: Queen Anne Marie & King Constantine II.  (Read 135195 times)
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Principessa

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« Reply #405 on: January 31, 2018, 12:30:48 AM »

I guess it were the Danish sisters who were especially close. The Dutch ones are close, but seem to be less
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fairy

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« Reply #406 on: February 02, 2018, 05:09:56 PM »

From all the biographies of royal sisters (be it the dutch, the danish - earlier generations as well - british etc) you get the impression they had all been extremely close - closer than the average sibling constellations.
I wonder if this is because it is commonly perceived as the ideal, that sisters are to be close and best friends and sisters who aren't are always  looked upon askew, or whether this was because the strange position as princesses and royal families simply never allowed many outsiders into the inner ring, thus  the girls simply had no other options.
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« Reply #407 on: February 02, 2018, 05:40:55 PM »


I've always thought the 3 sisters looked completely unalike but in this photo I think AM has a strong resemblance to Daisy.

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Chandrasekhi

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« Reply #408 on: February 02, 2018, 05:44:27 PM »

Fairy, could a reason be that many of the royal siblings were tutored at home by governesses and tutors and were hence each others' natural classmates and playmates?
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« Reply #409 on: February 02, 2018, 06:12:32 PM »

From all the biographies of royal sisters (be it the dutch, the danish - earlier generations as well - british etc) you get the impression they had all been extremely close - closer than the average sibling constellations.
I wonder if this is because it is commonly perceived as the ideal, that sisters are to be close and best friends and sisters who aren't are always  looked upon askew, or whether this was because the strange position as princesses and royal families simply never allowed many outsiders into the inner ring, thus  the girls simply had no other options.

Before I finished reading your post, your last conclusion instantly sprang to my mind: I think that mostly royal children had barely anyone outside their siblings to socialize with. Even when looking at the last Romanov kids (OTMA & Alexei) or also the Windsors (Elizabeth & Margaret, which wasn't that long ago historically speaking), they all literally had only each other..
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« Reply #410 on: February 02, 2018, 07:54:31 PM »

I haven't really been paying attention to this section of the board much but I have to say there's some interesting stuff here! I've never seen many of the videos posted here. And I never knew Pavlos could dance Greek dances like this: https://youtu.be/lkA7CC1Y8pA?t=41m53s  Roll Eyes

I also didn't know Anne-Marie could speak Greek.
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« Reply #411 on: February 02, 2018, 07:54:48 PM »

Excellent points. Plus that generation lived through WW2, so might be closer still.
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jessmie

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« Reply #412 on: February 03, 2018, 04:49:39 PM »

I think Anne-Marie spends time in Denmark frequently as does Benedikte. I find it really nice, if I am honest, that she goes back to visit her sister and the places she grew up in. I know a lot of people who only visit siblings or return to their birthplace on very rare occasions.

She has always been very welcome to Denmark. I've seen a lot of pictures of all the cousins being gathered at Fredensborg during summers in the late 60s and 70s and I am fairly certain that at some point after Constantine's dethronement and until the Greek referendum that rejected a   return to the monarchy, they've lived in Denmark too. I read in a biography, I cannot remember whose, that King Frederik was quite angry at Constantine because many of his actions and naivety led to the military coup that dethroned him, and Frederik and Ingrid were very concerned about Anne-Marie going through so many difficulties at such a young age.

Of course you could argue that life is tough, and other people, particularly in Greece, were living a rough life and didn't enjoy a fraction of Anne-Marie's wealth and opportunities, but she had lived a sheltered life and no doubt the coup shook her to her core. Within a period of three years she moved to a country that was completely different in terms of culture, mentality, language, everything really, got married, had  two children and had to flee and she was only 21!
« Last Edit: February 03, 2018, 05:03:29 PM by jessmie » Logged
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« Reply #413 on: February 03, 2018, 05:48:52 PM »

I think Anne-Marie spends time in Denmark frequently as does Benedikte. I find it really nice, if I am honest, that she goes back to visit her sister and the places she grew up in. I know a lot of people who only visit siblings or return to their birthplace on very rare occasions.

She has always been very welcome to Denmark. I've seen a lot of pictures of all the cousins being gathered at Fredensborg during summers in the late 60s and 70s and I am fairly certain that at some point after Constantine's dethronement and until the Greek referendum that rejected a   return to the monarchy, they've lived in Denmark too. I read in a biography, I cannot remember whose, that King Frederik was quite angry at Constantine because many of his actions and naivety led to the military coup that dethroned him, and Frederik and Ingrid were very concerned about Anne-Marie going through so many difficulties at such a young age.

Of course you could argue that life is tough, and other people, particularly in Greece, were living a rough life and didn't enjoy a fraction of Anne-Marie's wealth and opportunities, but she had lived a sheltered life and no doubt the coup shook her to her core. Within a period of three years she moved to a country that was completely different in terms of culture, mentality, language, everything really, got married, had  two children and had to flee and she was only 21!

I recall reading on this board and in interviews that both AM and Benny still have their own apartments in Amalienborg.  They're located in the same building where Jokke has his apartment. Not sure how big each apartment is, but that is where AM and Benny stay when they're in DK.  Not sure if each apartment is big enough to house their kids when the kids are in town, though. I thought I had read that they were small apartments.
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« Reply #414 on: February 03, 2018, 08:36:54 PM »

I think Anne-Marie spends time in Denmark frequently as does Benedikte. I find it really nice, if I am honest, that she goes back to visit her sister and the places she grew up in. I know a lot of people who only visit siblings or return to their birthplace on very rare occasions.

She has always been very welcome to Denmark. I've seen a lot of pictures of all the cousins being gathered at Fredensborg during summers in the late 60s and 70s and I am fairly certain that at some point after Constantine's dethronement and until the Greek referendum that rejected a   return to the monarchy, they've lived in Denmark too. I read in a biography, I cannot remember whose, that King Frederik was quite angry at Constantine because many of his actions and naivety led to the military coup that dethroned him, and Frederik and Ingrid were very concerned about Anne-Marie going through so many difficulties at such a young age.

Of course you could argue that life is tough, and other people, particularly in Greece, were living a rough life and didn't enjoy a fraction of Anne-Marie's wealth and opportunities, but she had lived a sheltered life and no doubt the coup shook her to her core. Within a period of three years she moved to a country that was completely different in terms of culture, mentality, language, everything really, got married, had  two children and had to flee and she was only 21!
No one has evere told anything negative about Anne-Marie particularly. Those who say negative things about her are people who deeply dislike monarchy generally. On the contrary, many negative things are said about Frederica - and it's all about her personality. Of course, Anne Marie was in Greece only 3 years, she didn't have any impact, she didn't have the time to leave her mark in the country so obviously there aren't many things to be said for her - imo.
As for the difficulties in such a young age, the problem was that back then it was very usual to have girls getting married very early, even younger than Anne-Marie, around 16 yo. especially in the villages. It's still common in rural areas in the country for the girls to get married and have kids around 19yo and you see them when they are 23, they already have 2-3 kids, no knowledge for the other side of the world, no interest to study or to do something on their own generaly, no curiosity to see anything else but the closest city etc. But this out of topic.
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jessmie

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« Reply #415 on: February 03, 2018, 11:55:40 PM »

I think Anne-Marie spends time in Denmark frequently as does Benedikte. I find it really nice, if I am honest, that she goes back to visit her sister and the places she grew up in. I know a lot of people who only visit siblings or return to their birthplace on very rare occasions.

She has always been very welcome to Denmark. I've seen a lot of pictures of all the cousins being gathered at Fredensborg during summers in the late 60s and 70s and I am fairly certain that at some point after Constantine's dethronement and until the Greek referendum that rejected a   return to the monarchy, they've lived in Denmark too. I read in a biography, I cannot remember whose, that King Frederik was quite angry at Constantine because many of his actions and naivety led to the military coup that dethroned him, and Frederik and Ingrid were very concerned about Anne-Marie going through so many difficulties at such a young age.

Of course you could argue that life is tough, and other people, particularly in Greece, were living a rough life and didn't enjoy a fraction of Anne-Marie's wealth and opportunities, but she had lived a sheltered life and no doubt the coup shook her to her core. Within a period of three years she moved to a country that was completely different in terms of culture, mentality, language, everything really, got married, had  two children and had to flee and she was only 21!
No one has evere told anything negative about Anne-Marie particularly. Those who say negative things about her are people who deeply dislike monarchy generally. On the contrary, many negative things are said about Frederica - and it's all about her personality. Of course, Anne Marie was in Greece only 3 years, she didn't have any impact, she didn't have the time to leave her mark in the country so obviously there aren't many things to be said for her - imo.
As for the difficulties in such a young age, the problem was that back then it was very usual to have girls getting married very early, even younger than Anne-Marie, around 16 yo. especially in the villages. It's still common in rural areas in the country for the girls to get married and have kids around 19yo and you see them when they are 23, they already have 2-3 kids, no knowledge for the other side of the world, no interest to study or to do something on their own generaly, no curiosity to see anything else but the closest city etc. But this out of topic.

I am not sure if even at that time it was particularly common for royal women to marry at such a young age. All of Anne-Marie contemporaries were quite a bit older than her when they got married. I have read in multiple forums that King Frederik and Queen Ingrid were quite concerned when Constantine asked for her hand in marriage. Rumour has it King Frederik even locked him in the room! Greece even now is the exact opposite of Denmark in every single way. Anne-Marie was only 17 when Constantine asked for her father's permission, and she would become queen straight away, she had to learn a whole new language which was very different to all the languages she spoke at the time, she had no support system in Greece, she had her first child at only 19... I mean yes, she had everything, money, nannies, tutors, but she was still incredibly young! And of course she had to deal with a mother-in-law from hell...
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« Reply #416 on: February 04, 2018, 12:29:53 AM »

I think Anne-Marie spends time in Denmark frequently as does Benedikte. I find it really nice, if I am honest, that she goes back to visit her sister and the places she grew up in. I know a lot of people who only visit siblings or return to their birthplace on very rare occasions.

She has always been very welcome to Denmark. I've seen a lot of pictures of all the cousins being gathered at Fredensborg during summers in the late 60s and 70s and I am fairly certain that at some point after Constantine's dethronement and until the Greek referendum that rejected a   return to the monarchy, they've lived in Denmark too. I read in a biography, I cannot remember whose, that King Frederik was quite angry at Constantine because many of his actions and naivety led to the military coup that dethroned him, and Frederik and Ingrid were very concerned about Anne-Marie going through so many difficulties at such a young age.

Of course you could argue that life is tough, and other people, particularly in Greece, were living a rough life and didn't enjoy a fraction of Anne-Marie's wealth and opportunities, but she had lived a sheltered life and no doubt the coup shook her to her core. Within a period of three years she moved to a country that was completely different in terms of culture, mentality, language, everything really, got married, had  two children and had to flee and she was only 21!
No one has evere told anything negative about Anne-Marie particularly. Those who say negative things about her are people who deeply dislike monarchy generally. On the contrary, many negative things are said about Frederica - and it's all about her personality. Of course, Anne Marie was in Greece only 3 years, she didn't have any impact, she didn't have the time to leave her mark in the country so obviously there aren't many things to be said for her - imo.
As for the difficulties in such a young age, the problem was that back then it was very usual to have girls getting married very early, even younger than Anne-Marie, around 16 yo. especially in the villages. It's still common in rural areas in the country for the girls to get married and have kids around 19yo and you see them when they are 23, they already have 2-3 kids, no knowledge for the other side of the world, no interest to study or to do something on their own generaly, no curiosity to see anything else but the closest city etc. But this out of topic.

I am not sure if even at that time it was particularly common for royal women to marry at such a young age. All of Anne-Marie contemporaries were quite a bit older than her when they got married. I have read in multiple forums that King Frederik and Queen Ingrid were quite concerned when Constantine asked for her hand in marriage. Rumour has it King Frederik even locked him in the room! Greece even now is the exact opposite of Denmark in every single way. Anne-Marie was only 17 when Constantine asked for her father's permission, and she would become queen straight away, she had to learn a whole new language which was very different to all the languages she spoke at the time, she had no support system in Greece, she had her first child at only 19... I mean yes, she had everything, money, nannies, tutors, but she was still incredibly young! And of course she had to deal with a mother-in-law from hell...

I agree with you, Jessmie. It may have been common in rural Greece, but it was not common in royal Europe.  I have also read about AM's parents freaking out over the engagement.  I've also read that one of the reasons why they married so soon was because of the death of Constantine's father.  Otherwise, Ingrid and Frederik wanted them to wait even longer than just after AM turned 18.  IIRC, once Paul died, Frederik and Ingrid then said, "Well, you still need to wait until after you turn 18."  They married a few weeks after AM's 18th birthday.
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« Reply #417 on: February 04, 2018, 12:42:00 AM »

I don't understand why Paul's death was the reason for Anne-Marie and Konstaninos have a wedding ceremony sooner. Couldn't he be king without a queen by his side? Was there any unwritten law?
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« Reply #418 on: February 04, 2018, 12:44:29 AM »

I don't understand why Paul's death was the reason for Anne-Marie and Konstaninos have a wedding ceremony sooner. Couldn't he be king without a queen by his side? Was there any unwritten law?

I have no idea.  I just recall reading in several places that the wedding was sped up because of Paul's death.  Thinking 
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« Reply #419 on: February 04, 2018, 04:02:14 AM »

If I am honest, I have only heard about Frederik and Ingrid's condition that they wait until Anne-Marie is 18 to get married.

However, I would assume that it was due to the political tensions at the time. The whole decade of the 60s was a tumultuous period for Greece's political scene because of the rise of Papandreou who at the time was considered too progressive and the tensions with the right-wing conservatives. The military coup of 1967 was brewing for some time, so perhaps Constantine getting married and having children as soon as possible would send a message that the monarchy was strong.
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