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Author Topic: Greek Royal News  (Read 340485 times)
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scarlett123

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« Reply #1080 on: April 07, 2021, 01:13:12 AM »

Converting it into a spa is really sad. Arent the kings and queens buried there? It would have been lovely to just see it as a museum. Sad
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onar

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« Reply #1081 on: April 07, 2021, 08:20:43 AM »

Converting it into a spa is really sad. Arent the kings and queens buried there? It would have been lovely to just see it as a museum. Sad
Years ago, I read that the place around the tumbs is concidered private and owned by the greek royal family.
I don't know if it's true, I hope it is because too many people would gladly vandalize such a monument even if it's someone burried there. Even worse: because of whom is burried there.
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scarlett123

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« Reply #1082 on: April 07, 2021, 02:41:32 PM »

Converting it into a spa is really sad. Arent the kings and queens buried there? It would have been lovely to just see it as a museum. Sad
Years ago, I read that the place around the tumbs is concidered private and owned by the greek royal family.
I don't know if it's true, I hope it is because too many people would gladly vandalize such a monument even if it's someone burried there. Even worse: because of whom is burried there.

Oh gosh...do the Greeks really disdain the former royals? To be fair, they don't really do anything for Greece. Did they participate in any charity fundraisers for Covid? I think all I saw was MC sending masks.
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periwinkle

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« Reply #1083 on: April 07, 2021, 04:13:14 PM »

I would hope that an easement could be put in place and maybe under the umbrella of cultural heritage to protect the family burial grounds. I am aware that the Greeks don't like their former royals but to think there is still such lingering hatred that the site could be vandalized is astounding to me. On the other hand if the spa is a very posh place there will be security anyway to protect the rich people. Ironic. Isn't that part of the Athens suburbs very posh? I remember reading a book years ago called Three Summers or Three Straw Hats that took place there. Not posh in a modern sense but in a Greek context.
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onar

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« Reply #1084 on: April 08, 2021, 10:45:28 AM »

Converting it into a spa is really sad. Arent the kings and queens buried there? It would have been lovely to just see it as a museum. Sad
Years ago, I read that the place around the tumbs is concidered private and owned by the greek royal family.
I don't know if it's true, I hope it is because too many people would gladly vandalize such a monument even if it's someone burried there. Even worse: because of whom is burried there.

Oh gosh...do the Greeks really disdain the former royals? To be fair, they don't really do anything for Greece. Did they participate in any charity fundraisers for Covid? I think all I saw was MC sending masks.
IMO they don't have to do a thing, it would only be worse, people will accuse them that they want to get involved and they hunt publicity, etc.
There is Anne-Marie Foundation, founded to support poeple hurt by natural disasters. We did have huge fires (more than 100 people died) 3 years ago, we had  floods 2 years ago and 4 villages were heavily affected, we had an earthquack a couple months ago - I didn't see the smallest sign that the foundation helped. Maybe they did and kept it secret but if their help is not visivble, who's funding them? Or it has stopped its action? I have no idea.

Most Greek people despise the idea of monarchy in general and the fact that their line is not greek. That's true but after 3-4 generations born and raised here, why Konstantinos should be accused for not being greek? IMO it's not right. Left wing people demand for refugee's kids born here to take greek nationality and have full political and civil rights, but Konstantinos not? He hurt the country in the past, yes, he can't do this now and the rest of his children trully do not care for the political scene here.

The end of WWII led the country into a civil war (and that's why we don't celebrate the end for the war, we honour our dead the day the german naziz entered in Athens) and since then, we do suffer from missconceptions of history, from some twisted idea that one side has to bring completely down the other side. Both sides have obsessions and all of them accuse the rest that chooses a middle path. The majority of that middle path has other  flaws, they see the road flat, not with ups and downs and that's not realistic.


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scarlett123

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« Reply #1085 on: April 17, 2021, 02:17:57 PM »

It's a shame the foundation wasn't available during those disasters...or if they were, their PR failed them miserably.

I just feel like the family had given up on Greece, except maybe Tatiana who seems to have met up with a government official to talk about mental health.
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desertrose

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« Reply #1086 on: April 17, 2021, 09:12:24 PM »

It seems the GRF valued their royal identity above their Greek one. I noticed this passage in a piece about Prince Philip in The Telegraph:

Quote
None of their children married Greeks. Instead three married members of the Russian imperial family, relations of their mother, and their eldest son chose as his wife Princess Sophie of Prussia, a sister of the Kaiser. Despite his father’s position as King of Denmark, King George’s ancestors included numerous German royalties. The marriages of his children and grandchildren consolidated these German links, and the style of address used by children of the Greek royal family reinforced the idea of a dynasty that, reigning in Greece, was not Greek: they were known, as Prince Andrew’s tombstone records, as princes and princesses of Greece and Denmark.

Source: https://www.telegraph.co....e-mother-anne-battenberg/
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Celia

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« Reply #1087 on: April 17, 2021, 10:04:00 PM »

It was the custom back in the day not to marry a subject but to marry "equals."  Silly article.
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scarlett123

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« Reply #1088 on: April 18, 2021, 01:40:47 PM »

It seems the GRF valued their royal identity above their Greek one. I noticed this passage in a piece about Prince Philip in The Telegraph:

Quote
None of their children married Greeks. Instead three married members of the Russian imperial family, relations of their mother, and their eldest son chose as his wife Princess Sophie of Prussia, a sister of the Kaiser. Despite his father’s position as King of Denmark, King George’s ancestors included numerous German royalties. The marriages of his children and grandchildren consolidated these German links, and the style of address used by children of the Greek royal family reinforced the idea of a dynasty that, reigning in Greece, was not Greek: they were known, as Prince Andrew’s tombstone records, as princes and princesses of Greece and Denmark.

Source: https://www.telegraph.co....e-mother-anne-battenberg/

Do you suppose if they had married a Greek woman it would have improved their popularity? Even the heir to Pavlos has the flags of Greece and Denmark on his Instagram page. And posts nothing about Greece.
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Gemsheal

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« Reply #1089 on: April 18, 2021, 03:27:50 PM »

The one and only Greek royal to marry a Greek woman was King Alexander (reigned 1917-1920) and it was considered morganatic.  Although his wife and daughter were raised to the HRH style after his unfortunate early death, I don't think the marriage was ever really approved of by the family, or even by the Greek people.

Nowadays of course the members of the "Greek RF" could marry anyone they choose.
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"... luscious woodbine,
With sweet musk roses and with eglantine:
There sleeps Titania sometime of the night,
Lull'd in these flowers with dances and delight."
 
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« Reply #1090 on: April 18, 2021, 04:09:31 PM »

The one and only Greek royal to marry a Greek woman was King Alexander (reigned 1917-1920) and it was considered morganatic.  Although his wife and daughter were raised to the HRH style after his unfortunate early death, I don't think the marriage was ever really approved of by the family, or even by the Greek people.

Nowadays of course the members of the "Greek RF" could marry anyone they choose.

Assuming they have the financial wherewithal to support the Instagram lifestyle.
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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #1091 on: April 19, 2021, 03:03:57 PM »

It was the custom back in the day not to marry a subject but to marry "equals."  Silly article.

ITA.

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Celia

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« Reply #1092 on: April 19, 2021, 03:57:27 PM »

The one and only Greek royal to marry a Greek woman was King Alexander (reigned 1917-1920) and it was considered morganatic.  Although his wife and daughter were raised to the HRH style after his unfortunate early death, I don't think the marriage was ever really approved of by the family, or even by the Greek people.

Nowadays of course the members of the "Greek RF" could marry anyone they choose.

Prince Michael, last surviving grandson of George I, married a Greek woman, Marina Karella.  Their daughters are princesses of Greece, but not of Denmark.
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Principessa

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« Reply #1093 on: April 19, 2021, 04:00:35 PM »

The one and only Greek royal to marry a Greek woman was King Alexander (reigned 1917-1920) and it was considered morganatic.  Although his wife and daughter were raised to the HRH style after his unfortunate early death, I don't think the marriage was ever really approved of by the family, or even by the Greek people.

Nowadays of course the members of the "Greek RF" could marry anyone they choose.

Prince Michael, last surviving grandson of George I, married a Greek woman, Marina Karella.  Their daughters are princesses of Greece, but not of Denmark.

Their youngest daughter, Olga, is married to her third cousin Prince Aimone of Savoy-Aosta, Duke of Aosta. The couple has 3 children, 2 boys and 1 girl.

"...Unlike other members of the Greek Royal Family, she was not deemed a full member of the Greek royal house under the monarchy, despite being born of a marriage recognized by King Constantine II of Greece (pursuant to Greek legislative decree 1298/1949). As daughters of a non-dynastic marriage, she and her elder sister, Princess Alexandra, are not accorded the traditional style of Royal Highness, nor do they bear the titular suffix "and Denmark"..."


In addition:
Marina --> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marina_Karella
Michael --> https://en.wikipedia.org/...ael_of_Greece_and_Denmark

Michael was a 1st cousin of Philip

Source: Wikipedia.
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Principessa

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« Reply #1094 on: April 19, 2021, 04:10:12 PM »

Prince Michael's father, prince Christopher, also had a non dynastic marriage (even considered dynastic by his family  Roll Eyes ).

Prince Christopher of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Χριστόφορος; 10 August 1888 – 21 January 1940) was the fifth and youngest son and youngest child of King George I of Greece. He was married 2 times:

On 1 January 1920, Christopher married a very wealthy American widow, Nonnie May "Nancy" Stewart Worthington Leeds. His bride, a once-divorced and once-widowed commoner at least a decade older than the prince, was nonetheless recognised as Christopher's dynastic wife by his family. (at the time of the engagement and wedding, the Greek royal family lived frugally in exile, and as Christopher was last in the dynasty's order of succession, any children he fathered would not impact the succession rights of other Greek dynasts). Her fortune, estimated in the tens of millions of dollars, was inherited from her second husband, a tin millionaire, and substantially eased the Greek royal family's exile during the 1920s. The  wedding followed a six-year engagement while the royal court-in-exile negotiated the terms and arrangements of the marriage. Shortly after their marriage, Princess Anastasia developed cancer, and died in London on 29 August 1923, leaving no children from this marriage.


I assume they were married based on her wealth and the lack of it within the then Greek royal family. And as also said in the text above, if there would have been childeren they would be very far into the line of succession.


Prince Christopher did, however, have a stepson, William Bateman Leeds Jr (1902–1971), who had, in 1921, married Princess Xenia Georgievna of Russia. She was Christopher's niece through his elder sister, Marie of Greece, Grand Duchess George of Russia.They wed in Paris on 9 October 1921. Theirs was seen as a splendid match and the couple was an influential one in New York's Long Island North Shore society, where they lived at Kenwood, their estate in Oyster Bay. Xenia and William had a daughter on 25 February 1925, Nancy Helen Marie Leeds. Xenia and William Leeds divorced in 1930. Xenia's second marriage was with Herman Jud (1911-1987), whom she married at Glen Cove, New York, on 10 August 1946.


Prince Christopher later remarried; his second wife was Princess Françoise of Orléans (25 December 1902 – 25 February 1953). Françoise was a daughter of Jean d'Orléans, Duc de Guise, Orléanist pretender to the throne of France, by his wife/first cousin, Isabelle d'Orléans. Isabelle was, in turn, a daughter of Philippe, Comte de Paris by his wife and first cousin, Infanta Isabel de Orléans y Borbon. The couple were married in 1929 in Palermo, Italy; the civil ceremony was on 10 February, and the religious one on 11 February.They were childless for a decade, then one child was born to Françoise: Prince Michael of Greece and Denmark was born in Rome in 1939, shortly before Prince Christopher's death.
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