Please read here on how to use images on RoyalDish. - Please read the RoyalDish message on board purpose and rules.
Images containing full nudity or sexual activities are strongly forbidden on RoyalDish.


Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Royal wine  (Read 706 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Pomme

Huge Member
********

Reputation: 935

Online Online

Netherlands Netherlands

Posts: 2475


Mary who?




Ignore
« on: December 07, 2018, 08:59:35 PM »

I've been schlepping boxes of wine to my basement today (bought at a fair/trade show a few weeks ago in France) and this got me wondering:

has anyone on this board ever tried Henrik's Cahors (a.o.) from his Ch. de Caïx/Cayx? Or Felix's Chateau les Crostes' rosé, white or cremant? Or even Tignanello (which, at around 80+ euros a bottle, and 14+% alcohol and the 'in yer face' style that makes a Super Tuscan 'super', doesn't really appeal to me)??
Logged

Talk to the hair, you slitherin' Skank
http://i.imgur.com/2mUIe.jpg
Celia

Warned
Large Member
******

Reputation: 385

Offline Offline

Posts: 1420





Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2018, 10:58:48 PM »

I once had some wine made by the Hesse family (or sold under their name, I should say).  It was quite good.
Logged
YellowPoppy

Mini Member
***

Reputation: 120

Offline Offline

Posts: 298





Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2018, 11:59:29 PM »

I've been schlepping boxes of wine to my basement today (bought at a fair/trade show a few weeks ago in France) and this got me wondering:

has anyone on this board ever tried Henrik's Cahors (a.o.) from his Ch. de Caïx/Cayx? Or Felix's Chateau les Crostes' rosé, white or cremant? Or even Tignanello (which, at around 80+ euros a bottle, and 14+% alcohol and the 'in yer face' style that makes a Super Tuscan 'super', doesn't really appeal to me)??

I did drink a Chateau les Croste, but I don’t remember anything about it. I thought it was a red whine, might be wrong. Very vague souvenir and wouldn’t have noticed it was Felix’ wine if someone didn’t mention it.
Logged

Once you are Real you can?t be ugly, except to people who don?t understand. - The Velveteen Rabbit
Kaiserin

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1579

Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 3561





Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2018, 11:55:47 AM »

I once had some wine made by the Hesse family (or sold under their name, I should say).  It was quite good.

Yes, their winery is one of the oldest in Germany, dedicated to the famous Riesling grape (I guess 90% of their wines are Riesling).
Their winemaker, Sascha Huber, has won several international prices for his wine.
If you like Riesling, it's a good choice. They offer Riesling in all price classes, from a simple but good table wine up to the grand crus.
I like this one very much:
https://www.vinothek-prin...-class-detailZ3-span.html

Lufthansa often has their wines on offer in their business class.

__

As for the "Tig", I've said it elsewhere already, this wine is totally overhyped like some Bordeaux'. You pay mostly the name on the label, not the contents. Instead of spending 80 EUR for a bottle of Tignanello, you may buy 2 or 3 Piedmont Barbarescos and have the better wine.
(Says a lot about Imelda that she chose this wine to name her blog - focus is on "expensive" and "label").

Most of the wines we have at home are Italian (Piedmont, where we are friends with some winemakers, and Puglia), Spanish, Chilean, South African or Argentinian (Malbec!).
I do not have much experience with French wines (have never found a French Red I really liked, but on the white side, some Sancerres were really good, and the Alsacian Gewuerztraminer aren't bad, either. And Cremant, for sure), but I guess the wine from Felix' wine estate isn't that known outside France?
Logged
Pomme

Huge Member
********

Reputation: 935

Online Online

Netherlands Netherlands

Posts: 2475


Mary who?




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2018, 10:22:38 PM »

Thanks for the tip Kaiserin! I do cook things that need a Riesling every once in a while, and the Hesse ones deserve a try. Heck any wine with a badger on the label deserves a buying a whole case to try 

@ YellowPoppy: Crostes do make one red, too, but the majority seems to be rosé and white.

I found a wine merchant in The Netherlands that carries various Crostes wines (also online) - if there's one, there's usually a few more. So not well known I guess, but available outside France.

My 'cave' is probably 80% French, with 1/3 bordeaux 1/3 bourgogne and 1/3 other regions (Champagne, Chablis, Cts du Rhone incl Chateauneuf-du-Pape and Gigondas, and 'odd' appellations like Madiran). Through the years and many many many tastings (mainly at salons de vignerons independants), we've found a few bordeaux that really do age well and offer a lot of taste-per-euro. Especially when tasting the wine 'en primeur' (before it is actually bottled) you get the opportunity to buy the wine at a discount, only for it to be bottled and ready for shipping a year later. The wine maker will tell you quite honestly if a year is exceptional or not (so I'm saving up for a few cases of 2018, it will be like 2000 or 2005), and how many years before it is at its prime. These are the cases we 'forget' and find again - we're now drinking year 2000 on special occasions. Such a treat.


The other 20% is presents, Spanish (Priorat!), and lesser known origins like Croatia, Portugal, Azerbaijan, Austria (I need my Grüner Veltliner) Switzerland (and Fendant!).
Verrry few bottles from Italy I am ashamed to admit. But I'm glad I have a very dear friend who is into Italian reds, and he will make sure that's what we drink at his place.

Logged

Talk to the hair, you slitherin' Skank
http://i.imgur.com/2mUIe.jpg
Kaiserin

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1579

Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 3561





Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2018, 12:55:51 AM »

Oh, yes, 2018 will be an exceptional wine year, and I am really looking forward to the Barbaresco and Barolo made this year. But also the German winemakers were jumping with joy (maybe they are the only "growers" who do that, as the farmers really had a shit year crop wise).

Seems a fascinating idea to buy the wine even before it's bottled and just wait  Champagne.

We use to buy the Barolo like 3 years old (i.e., as soon as they come to market, as they are still reasonably priced then) and then store it for another 7 years or so ... and we have indeed 6 Bottles of Rocche dei Manzonis Capella di Santo Stefano 2010, which will be our biggest treat then, 2010 was what the Italians call their centennial vintage.

Austria has, BTW, some great wines. I do especially like the Morillon (from Polz). It's a white, but boy, what a body.

I'd exchange some insider tips for Italy against your French ones, Pomme!
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: