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Author Topic: Royal Last Names?  (Read 21834 times)
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Principessa

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« Reply #75 on: July 24, 2019, 09:59:19 PM »

A Dutch friend of mine has her name hyphenated.

Ah, that is something more common over here. My mom was know for a long time as: Mrs. First name Married last name - Maidenname
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« Reply #76 on: July 24, 2019, 10:21:08 PM »

A Dutch friend of mine has her name hyphenated.

Ah, that is something more common over here. My mom was know for a long time as: Mrs. First name Married last name - Maidenname
That's exactly what she did.  Thumb up
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #77 on: July 25, 2019, 03:38:28 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
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Harley
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« Reply #78 on: July 25, 2019, 10:10:15 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?

It must be a local thing. I live in Denmark and I have never heard of that custom before.
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« Reply #79 on: July 25, 2019, 02:31:55 PM »

With growing feminism and with equally growing divorce rates, women are looking for options differing from the old traditional ones:
switching from father's name to husband's name smacks too much of the old "changing of possession".
And who the heck wants to keep their exes' name? (well apart from Tessy obviously).
As society changes, so do attitudes and customs and I will very much advise my daughters to keep their names, even though I myself changed mine upon marriage. (well I make an exception should they want to marry a Rockefeller, in that case they can hyphenate  Wink)
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« Reply #80 on: July 25, 2019, 05:59:21 PM »

With growing feminism and with equally growing divorce rates, women are looking for options differing from the old traditional ones:
switching from father's name to husband's name smacks too much of the old "changing of possession".
And who the heck wants to keep their exes' name? (well apart from Tessy obviously).
As society changes, so do attitudes and customs and I will very much advise my daughters to keep their names, even though I myself changed mine upon marriage. (well I make an exception should they want to marry a Rockefeller, in that case they can hyphenate  Wink)

It’s such a pain in the ass too. The federal government has my married name but I still haven’t changed it in all the million and one places out there that need to be...4 years married in October  Blush
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« Reply #81 on: July 26, 2019, 03:32:55 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?

It must be a local thing. I live in Denmark and I have never heard of that custom before.
     
 
When Mother's first cousin in the Slovak Republic writes, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Could this have been a Hungarian custom from centuries ago?
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« Reply #82 on: July 26, 2019, 09:46:45 AM »

I have many hungarian friends and acquaintances but never heard of it as a tradition.. perhaps your relative uses her maiden name inside her Family to make sure everybody knows who she is?
E.G. I had to call and contact several old family relations and I used my maiden name as my married name would not have been familiar with the people and it was easier that way.
I also used my maiden name lately when I emailed with old school pals for a reunion.
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« Reply #83 on: July 26, 2019, 12:19:18 PM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
No, it's not customary in Slovakia to use your maiden name when you are married, I haven't seen it even in private correspondence. Same for Hungary, once you are married you use your married name unless you keep your maiden name.
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« Reply #84 on: July 27, 2019, 03:55:38 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
No, it's not customary in Slovakia to use your maiden name when you are married, I haven't seen it even in private correspondence. Same for Hungary, once you are married you use your married name unless you keep your maiden name.
     
 
Mother and her first cousin did not keep their maiden names. They may just use the maiden name in mail correspondence.
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« Reply #85 on: July 28, 2019, 02:31:49 PM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
No, it's not customary in Slovakia to use your maiden name when you are married, I haven't seen it even in private correspondence. Same for Hungary, once you are married you use your married name unless you keep your maiden name.
     
 
Mother and her first cousin did not keep their maiden names. They may just use the maiden name in mail correspondence.

It's definitely not customary in Europe (Western or Eastern). Seems they do it for their personal reason.
You could ask them (and then tell us more to enlihgten us!).
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« Reply #86 on: July 29, 2019, 03:41:16 AM »

When my mother writes to relatives in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, her maiden, not her married, name goes in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. Is this a European custom?
No, it's not customary in Slovakia to use your maiden name when you are married, I haven't seen it even in private correspondence. Same for Hungary, once you are married you use your married name unless you keep your maiden name.
     
 
Mother and her first cousin did not keep their maiden names. They may just use the maiden name in mail correspondence.

It's definitely not customary in Europe (Western or Eastern). Seems they do it for their personal reason.
You could ask them (and then tell us more to enlihgten us!).

     
 
Olya, Mother and her cousin use their maiden name in mail correspondence. Legally they use their husbands' surnames.
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« Reply #87 on: September 24, 2021, 01:36:03 AM »

The House of Romania is the House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. The name sounds German. That is because Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen was a principality in Germany.
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« Reply #88 on: February 04, 2022, 10:36:20 PM »

Inside the meaning of the British Royal Family's last name   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYmLQhzWFxY
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Principessa

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« Reply #89 on: March 01, 2022, 11:03:17 AM »

Inside the meaning of the British Royal Family's last name   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYmLQhzWFxY

According to Wikipedia (and my own understanding):

"...Edward VII and, in turn, his son, George V, were members of the German ducal House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha by virtue of their descent from Albert, Prince Consort, husband of Queen Victoria, the last British monarch from the House of Hanover. High anti-German sentiment amongst the people of the British Empire during World War I reached a peak in March 1917, when the Gotha G.IV, a heavy aircraft capable of crossing the English Channel, began bombing London directly and became a household name. In the same year, on 15 March, King George's first cousin, Nicholas II, the Emperor of Russia, was forced to abdicate, which raised the spectre of the eventual abolition of all the monarchies in Europe. The King and his family were finally persuaded to abandon all titles held under the German Crown and to change German titles and house names to anglicised versions. Hence, on 17 July 1917, a royal proclamation issued by George V declared:

Now, therefore, We, out of Our Royal Will and Authority, do hereby declare and announce that as from the date of this Our Royal Proclamation Our House and Family shall be styled and known as the House and Family of Windsor, and that all the descendants in the male line of Our said Grandmother Queen Victoria who are subjects of these Realms, other than female descendants who may marry or may have married, shall bear the said Name of Windsor....."



"The name had a long association with monarchy in Britain, through the town of Windsor, Berkshire, and Windsor Castle; the link is alluded to in the Round Tower of Windsor Castle being the basis of the badge of the House of Windsor. It was suggested by Arthur Bigge, 1st Baron Stamfordham. Upon hearing that his cousin had changed the name of the British royal house to Windsor and in reference to Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor, German Emperor Wilhelm II remarked jokingly that he planned to see "The Merry Wives of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha".

George V also restricted the use of British princely titles to his nearest relations,[5] and in 1919, he stripped three of his German relations of their British titles and styles."



At the same time, more British-affiliated royals and nobles renounced or changed their German name.

F.e.

"...Lieutenant Colonel Adolphus Cambridge, 1st Marquess of Cambridge, GCB, GCVO, CMG, ADC (Adolphus Charles Alexander Albert Edward George Philip Louis Ladislaus; 13 August 1868 – 24 October 1927), born Prince Adolphus of Teck and later The Duke of Teck, was a relative of the British Royal Family, a great-grandson of King George III and younger brother of Queen Mary, the wife of King George V. In 1900, he succeeded his father as Duke of Teck in the Kingdom of Württemberg. He relinquished his German titles in 1917 to become Marquess of Cambridge...."


"....The Mountbatten family is a British dynasty that originated as an English branch of the German princely Battenberg family. The name was adopted on 14 July 1917, just three days before the British royal family had its name changed to Windsor, by members of the Battenberg family residing in the United Kingdom, due to rising anti-German sentiment amongst the British public during World War I. The name is a direct Anglicisation of the German Battenberg (lit. 'Batten Mountain'), a small town in Hesse. The title of count of Battenberg, later prince of Battenberg, was granted to a morganatic branch of the House of Hesse-Darmstadt, itself a cadet branch of the House of Hesse, in the mid 19th century...."




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