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Principessa

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« Reply #4905 on: January 26, 2022, 08:51:18 AM »

The 23 Biggest Royal Tiaras In The World  : including The Stuart tiara, The Bragança Tiara, The Luxembourg Empire Tiara, The Dutch Sapphire Tiara, Queen Sophie's Diamond Tiara, The Greville Tiara and many more.

The Wurttemberg Floral Tiara is also a big one:
https://www.pinterest.se/pin/279082508136772896/
and another one
Queen Charlotte diamond tiara (Wurttemberg):


SOURCE.






Gloria, Dowager Princess Thurn and Taxis; Queen Marie of Romania; Diane, Duchess of Württemberg



 the Braganza Tiara, only brought out for certain occasions. And then there are the tiaras which serve these days as specifically queen's tiaras, like the Fleur de Lys Tiara from Spain or Empress Joséphine's Emerald Tiara from Norway



the Luxembourg Empire Tiara, the Dutch Stuart Tiara.




 Boucheron Honeycomb Tiara, the Leuchtenberg Sapphire Tiara, the Mellerio Sapphire Tiara.


 The Cameo Tiara, the Fife Tiara, Queen Sophie's Diamond Tiara, the Portland Sapphire Tiara.


The Delhi Durbar Tiara, Queen Fabiola's Spanish Wedding Gift Tiara, the Poltimore Tiara, Empress Joséphine's Diamond Tiara as loaned to Princess Grace

source: http://orderofsplendor.bl...tiaras-pick-your-big.html
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« Reply #4906 on: January 26, 2022, 09:36:25 AM »

The Fife tiara:
https://www.thecourtjewel...18/06/the-fife-tiara.html

One of the most stunning tiaras in the collections of the extended British royal family, the Fife Tiara was given to Princess Louise, the daughter of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra, as a wedding gift in 1889.

Louise’s new husband had inherited the Fife earldom when his father died; but that title wasn’t quite lofty enough for a granddaughter of the monarch, so Queen Victoria made him the Duke of Fife just before the wedding. The tiara was a gift from the newly-elevated duke to his bride. (Geoffrey Munn argues that the tiara was a gift from Louise’s parents, but contemporary newspaper reports clarify that this tiara was a gift from Lord Fife.) It seems extremely likely that the tiara was constructed based on a design by Oscar Massin, who had exhibited a very similar piece at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1878. Massin didn’t generally produce his tiara designs himself; instead, he partnered with other jewelry firms who executed the pieces he’d created. However, the maker of this tiara has never been positively identified.





The Portland Sapphire tiara
https://www.thecourtjewel...er-portland-sapphire.html

A tiara without a royal wearer in its history.

Our "Portland" name comes from the tiara's family, of course: the tiara was created by E. Wolff & Co. for Garrard shortly after William Cavendish-Bentinck, the 6th Duke of Portland, married Winnifred Dallas-Yorke in 1889. In the true tradition of owning jewels for use and wear instead of museum-like adoration, this tiara is a composite of other family jewels that were broken down to create it.





Queen Fabiola's Spanish Wedding Gift Tiara
https://www.thecourtjewel...h-wedding-gift-tiara.html
http://orderofsplendor.bl...een-fabiolas-spanish.html

When Spain's Doña Fabiola de Mora y Aragón married Belgium's King Baudouin in 1960, she received a tiara from the Spanish government. This isn't the only royal tiara out there presented by General Franco (the Spanish head of state at the time) - Queen Sofia received one as well. In Fabiola's case, it was a particularly useful gift, because Belgium was running a little low in the tiara department.

As Queen, Fabiola had just three tiaras to use: the Nine Provinces Tiara, a small diamond necklace tiara, and this one. Luckily for Fabiola, this one performs enough tricks to create two different tiaras and a necklace in three different colors. That makes it one of the most convertible tiaras out there

In its full format, it features leaf-like floral ornaments on top of a tall base, resembling some of the coronets from Spanish nobility (the Duchess of Alba has been photographed in a similar piece). It's tall and imposing this way, with the feel of a crown, and it would certainly qualify as a big gun tiara. A smaller tiara can be created by assembling just the leaf elements on a base, or they can be suspended from a necklace.


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« Reply #4907 on: January 26, 2022, 02:27:52 PM »

Thurn und Taxis Sapphire Tiara
https://royalwatcherblog....02/23/thurn-taxis-tiaras/

...Featuring large sapphire and diamond clusters in a huge, ornate diamond frame , the Thurn und Taxis Sapphire Tiara, made by made by F.Kreuter, is a family heirloom from the 19th century and was pictured on Archduchess Margarethe Klementine in the late 1800s, before appearing on Princess Gloria in the 1980s and 1990s. The parure, which features huge sapphires that can be replaced with diamonds, has also been worn often, even after Princess Gloria was widowed.. ....

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« Reply #4908 on: January 26, 2022, 02:39:03 PM »

Vladimir Sapphire Kokoshnik
https://royalwatcherblog....dimir-sapphire-kokoshnik/


A tiara started up in Russia, went to Romania, then Austria, and finally the United States. Commissioned by Grand Duchess Vladimir from Cartier in 1909, the Kokoshnik Tiara featured a large 137.2 carat cushion cut sapphire and six cabochon sapphires that had belonged to Empress Alexandra Feodorovna of Russia. The Grand Duchess notably wore the piece for a grand portrait, along with a host of other large sapphire pieces. After her jewels were dramatically smuggled from Russia in the aftermath of the Revolution, and her death in 1920, the Sapphire Kokoshnik was inherited by her eldest son, Grand Duke Kyril and his wife (and her niece) Princess Victoria Meltia of Edinburgh (known as Grand Duchess Victoria Feodorovna).

In exile, the couple were struggling financially, but luckily for them, a buyer was close at hand, Queen Marie of Romania, sister of the Grand Duchess Victoria Feodorovna, who had lost her jewels in Russia during WWI.


Queen Marie of Romania loved the Vladimir Sapphire Kokoshnik and it became her trademark tiara, well suited to her fairytale-like tastes. She notably wore it for a variety of portraits, her Coronation, and in her painting by Phillip Lazlo. In 1931, she gave the Kokoshnik as a wedding gift to her youngest and favourite daughter, Princess Ileana, when she married Archduke Anton of Austria. Queen Marie often wore the piece with her large sapphire and diamond sautoir.


 Princess Ileana talked about rarely wearing the Tiara in the early years of her marriage in her  memoir ‘I Live Again’. She loaned it back to Queen Marie to wear at King George V’s Silver Jubilee in London, where it stayed in a bank vault until after her death, and made escapes from Austria and Romania, where Princess Ileana and her family escaped to in 1944, living at the famous Bran Castle. In 1948, her nephew, King Michael, abdicated and the family were exiled again, this time ending up in Argentina, where it again made a daring escape. In 1950, Princess Ileana traveled with the Kokoshnik to United States, wrapped in nightgown because she was too poor to insure it. She then sold it back to Cartier to build a new life for herself and her children, eventually becoming a nun. Princess Ileana said:”It was both beautiful and splendid, but my children were in need. As it stood, it neither fed us nor clothed us nor warmed us. I could not even wear it.” The Kokoshnik was probably broken up and has disappeared into the pages of history.



« Last Edit: January 26, 2022, 02:49:08 PM by Principessa » Logged
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« Reply #4909 on: January 26, 2022, 02:52:12 PM »

One way or another, I yet can't figure (the name / origin / etc) out this tiara of Queen Marie of Romania:

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« Reply #4910 on: January 26, 2022, 03:20:05 PM »

The Fife tiara:
https://www.thecourtjewel...18/06/the-fife-tiara.html

One of the most stunning tiaras in the collections of the extended British royal family, the Fife Tiara was given to Princess Louise, the daughter of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra, as a wedding gift in 1889.

Louise’s new husband had inherited the Fife earldom when his father died; but that title wasn’t quite lofty enough for a granddaughter of the monarch, so Queen Victoria made him the Duke of Fife just before the wedding. The tiara was a gift from the newly-elevated duke to his bride. (Geoffrey Munn argues that the tiara was a gift from Louise’s parents, but contemporary newspaper reports clarify that this tiara was a gift from Lord Fife.) It seems extremely likely that the tiara was constructed based on a design by Oscar Massin, who had exhibited a very similar piece at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1878. Massin didn’t generally produce his tiara designs himself; instead, he partnered with other jewelry firms who executed the pieces he’d created. However, the maker of this tiara has never been positively identified.





I would be more inclined to believe Geoffrey Munn than 'contemporary newspaper accounts' which were often inaccurate and skewed towards covering up the truth, especially when the truth was unsavory to the masses (such as spending an exorbitant amount of tax-payer money on a new tiara). JMO
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« Reply #4911 on: January 26, 2022, 03:31:24 PM »

Royal kokoshnik style tiara's:


Queen Alexandra kokoshnik tiara
In 1888, the Prince and Princess of Wales (later King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra of the United Kingdom) celebrated their silver wedding anniversary. The milestone was an important marital mileston — and an important opportunity for courtiers to gain favor by offering the couple spectacular presents. But those kinds of gifts didn’t come cheap, and aristocrats in the late nineteenth-century weren’t necessarily flush with cash; remember that many of them had already begun marrying American heiresses to help prop up their sagging fortunes.

One group of aristocratic women found a simple solution: they pooled their resources, forming a committee called the “Ladies of Society.” The committee was led by four prominent women: the Marchioness of Salisbury (who was the wife of the Prime Minister); Maria, Marchioness of Ailesbury (who was a supporter of the opposition Liberal Party); the Countess Spencer; and the Countess of Cork. Under their leadership, the committee raised the necessary money to buy a major piece of jewelry for Alexandra. To make sure she’d like what she was given, they asked her directly for input.

Alexandra knew precisely what she wanted: a tiara just like one worn by her sister, Empress Marie Feodorovna of Russia. Marie Feodorovna frequently wore a grand diamond fringe tiara shaped like a kokoshnik, which is a halo-shaped headdress worn by Russian women. To emphasize and reinforce the kokoshnik shape, the Empress wore her diamond tiara with a stiff fabric backing.

The Ladies of Society turned to the crown jeweler, Garrard, to make a tiara similar to the Russian piece. The firm crafted a diadem of white and yellow gold set with diamonds. Like Marie Feodorovna’s tiara, the piece was made of individual pavé-set bars, though Alexandra’s fringes were more rounded at the tip. Alexandra’s kokoshnik featured 77 of these fringe pieces, and the entire tiara was packed with more than 400 diamonds. Even better, it was convertible, able to be taken off of its frame and worn as a fringe necklace.






Princess Olga’s Diamond Kokoshnik Tiara
This glittering Diamond Kokoshnik Tiara was worn by a series of women that spent their lives in exile. Princess Nicholas of Greece spent parts of her life exiled from Russia and Greece due to politics. Her daughter, Princess Paul of Yugoslavia, was exiled with her husband after the Allies took-over Yugoslavia during WWII. Her daughter-in-law, Princess Maria-Pia, was exiled from her native Italy at an early age.

The Diamond Kokoshnik Tiara consists of diamond-set motif is filled with filigree motifs and diamond clusters, as well as detachable diamond clusters, and was a wedding gift to Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovna of Russia from her mother, the infamous Grand Duchess Vladimir, in 1902.

When Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark married Prince Paul of Yugoslavia, cousin to the Yugoslavian King, in 1923 she received the Diamond Kokoshnik Tiara as a wedding gift from her mother, Princess Nicholas. She wore the tiara on many occasions during the Inter-war years, when Prince and Princess Paul represented the Yugoslavian King at international royal events, and later when he became the Regent for the young King Peter II, which included a State Visit to Britain, and a State Visit to Nazi Germany in 1939, During the Second World War, Prince Paul was ousted and sent into exile by the Allies during WWII and afterwards, the communist government abolished the monarchy, the royal family were prohibited from returning to Yugoslavia, and had all their property confiscated.

In 1960, Princess Olga loaned her Diamond Kokoshnik Tiara to her daughter-in-law, Princess Maria Pia of Savoy, for the Wedding Ball of King Baudouin of Belgium. While Princess Olga’s Boucheron Diamond Tiara was worn by Princess Barbra of Liechtenstein, the second wife of Prince Alexander, and now belongs to the Albion Art Institute, the Diamond Kokoshnik Tiara hasn’t been publicly seen since the 1960s and current location and owner of this tiara is unknown, but it definitely isn’t in the family.






The emerald kokoshnik of of Grand Duchess Elisabeth Feodorovna of Russia



the Greville Emerald Kokoshnik tiara
The diamond and emerald headpiece, made by the French jeweler Boucheron in 1919, is just under 100 years old. But it has belonged to the royal family for only a little over 75. Its original owner was Dame Margaret Greville, a famous society hostess who, upon her death, left her jewels to the Queen Mother. When the Queen Mother passed away in 2002, much of that collection, including the Kokoshnik tiara, went to Queen Elizabeth. Now, in 2018, the Queen lent it to Princess Eugenie for her wedding day—making it quite the extravagant “something borrowed.”




Empress Maria Feodorovna of Russia's Sapphire Kokoshnik
Empress Marie Feodorovna of Russia wears a diamond and sapphire tiara on a pearl-edged fabric kokoshnik backing in a portrait by Konstantin Makovsky, ca. 1870s; the tiara was confiscated after the revolution, and its current status is unknown




Empress Marie Feodorovna fringe tiara/kokoshnik





Vladimir Sapphire Kokoshnik

See above, in my previous post about this tiara.


Queen Marie's Blackened Steel Kokoshnik
This tiara combines blackened steel, steel that has been treated so that it has a darker finish, with platinum mounting and precious stones in a kokoshnik shape. Bordered by bands of calibré-cut rubies and old-mine and rose-cut diamonds, the center portion of the tiara includes thirteen pear-shaped diamonds set in calibré-cut ruby frames and single circular-cut diamonds set on the stark background created by the blackened steel.

The tiara was made to a special order in 1914 by Cartier. It is among a series of kokoshnik-shaped tiaras made by the French firm around this time that experimented with materials beyond diamonds and their valuable gem counterparts. Others included the Yusupov Rock Crystal Tiara (made in 1911) and the Cartier Onyx Tree Kokoshnik (made in 1914). Using steel made for a less expensive tiara.

The Blackened Steel Kokoshnik was made for Queen Marie of Romania (1875-1938). Born Princess Marie of Edinburgh, she married Crown Prince Ferdinand of Romania in 1893 and became queen consort the same year this tiara was created. While other jewels that belonged to Queen Marie were lost or dismantled over time, the kokoshnik made its way back to the Cartier collection. It’s now often used in Cartier exhibits, where it can be admired by all.




Sources:
http://orderofsplendor.blogspot.com/
https://royalwatcherblog.com/
https://www.thecourtjeweller.com
« Last Edit: January 26, 2022, 03:39:34 PM by Principessa » Logged
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« Reply #4912 on: January 26, 2022, 03:40:14 PM »

Oooooh, keep it coming Principessa, I'm in magpie heaven! Banana
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« Reply #4913 on: January 26, 2022, 03:52:44 PM »

the Swedish aquamarine kokoshnik tiara
The aquamarine kokoshnik owned by Sweden’s Princess Margaretha. It’s said that this tiara originally belonged to Margaretha’s grandmother, Margaret of Connaught, who was the first wife of King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden. The tiara also has a coordinating aquamarine and diamond brooch. The set was supposedly a later addition to Margaret’s jewelry collection, not one of her wedding gifts. The maker of the tiara is unknown

We’re probably all familiar with the tragic story of Margaret of Connaught’s death, which led to the division of her jewels among her children. If this piece was indeed a part of her collection, it was inherited by her eldest son, Gustaf Adolf, who was expected one day to become king. His wife, Princess Sibylla of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, debuted the tiara at a ball ahead of their civil wedding in Coburg in 1932. Sibylla wore the aquamarines throughout her lifetime, even after the untimely death of her husband in a 1947 plane crash. She was the de facto first lady of Sweden following the death of Queen Louise, and she was regularly bedecked in jewels.

When Princess Sibylla died in 1972, the aquamarines were inherited by her eldest daughter, Princess Margaretha. She had worn the tiara even before Sibylla’s deathAs a young woman, Margaretha wore the tiara on many occasions, including at the wedding of her youngest sister, Princess Christina, in 1974. Margaretha’s daughter, named Sibylla for her grandmother, also wore the heirloom tiara for her own wedding to Baron Cornelius von Dincklage in 1998.


After the 1998 wedding, there was a long stretch of time where the aquamarines were not seen in public. Many feared that they had been sold. And then, in June 2010, Princess Margaretha unexpectedly appeared at the wedding of her niece, Crown Princess Victoria, wearing both the aquamarine tiara and the coordinating brooch.


There were persistent rumors, however, the the tiara was sold — and that the buyer was Margaretha’s brother, the king. However, Princess Christina has said publicly that Margaretha does still own the tiara but now keeps it in the vaults in Sweden with the rest of the Bernadotte jewels, where the rest of the members of the family have access to it. As Margaretha lives a quiet life in the English countryside, it certainly makes much more sense for other members of the family to get more use out of the piece. Margaretha only wears gala jewels these days when she visits Sweden, so the tiara is there for her to use when she wants, as she did for Prince Carl Philip’s wedding in June 2015. And Princess Madeleine has done just that: since December 2015, she has worn her aunt’s tiara at the Nobel Prize ceremony, at a tea party for sick children, in an official portrait, and for a state banquet.






The Rosenborg Kokoshnik
The kokoshnik was made by Danish court jeweler Dragsted in the 1930s on the order of Prince Viggo, Count of Rosenborg (1893-1970), a grandson of King Christian IX of Denmark. He commissioned it for his American-born wife, Princess Viggo (1895-1966, née Eleanor Green). Prince and Princess Viggo had no children of their own, and the tiara was inherited by Viggo’s sister-in-law Princess Margaretha (1899-1977). Margaretha was a Swedish royal who married Prince Axel of Denmark. The tiara was then used by Countess Ruth of Rosenborg (1924-2010), wife of Margaretha and Axel’s son, Flemming. She wore it for several notable Scandinavian royal events, but following her death, it was offered for sale at a 2012 auction. The estimated value was placed at more than $200,000, but it did not sell.




Romanov Pearl Kokoshnik Tiara



Maria Vladimirovna's pearl kokoshnik
Maria Vladimirovna is the granddaughter of Grand Duke Kirill Vladimirovich of Russia and his wife, Princess Victoria Melita of Edinburgh. Kirill was the most senior male member of the Romanov family to survive the Russian revolution, and during his lifetime, most (but not all) recognized him as the head of the house — some even considered him to be the rightful tsar. After his death, his son Vladimir Kirillovich followed in his footsteps. Vladimir was Marie Vladimirovna’s father; he died in 1992. Her right to the position of head of the House of Romanov has been disputed by many, for several complicated reasons, but this year, the head of the Russian Orthodox Church recognized her claim. Who knows — the jockeying for position within the surviving Romanovs has always been a tricky business.

Like its owner’s claims to be the preeminent Romanov, this tiara’s legitimacy has also been questioned — some suspect that it’s a fake. Set with stones that look like diamonds and pearls, with rows of smaller pearls across the top, the tiara echoes the jewelry of Romanovs past. But it’s entirely possible that the piece is indeed set with synthetic stones. Unless experts get a closer look at it, we’ll probably never really know for certain, though I tend to side with those who believe that the tiara is not set with precious stones.While Maria Vladimirovna has worn several other tiaras during her life, this is the piece she reaches for most frequently these days.




Maria Vladimirovna with a kokoshnik with acquamarines (and pearls?)



Maria Vladimirovna with an amethyst and pearl kokoshnik




Sources:
http://orderofsplendor.blogspot.com/
https://royalwatcherblog.com/
https://www.thecourtjeweller.com
« Last Edit: January 26, 2022, 03:59:53 PM by Principessa » Logged
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« Reply #4914 on: January 26, 2022, 04:10:02 PM »

Russian aquamarine kokoshnik tiara

https://www.katiecallahan...uamarine-kokoshnik-tiara/

Reportedly created for Empress Alexandra Feodorovna (who had some amazing tiaras) around 1900, the tiara features lines and arches of diamonds and also showcases 16 graduated rectangular aquamarine stones set in platinum. We don’t have any photographs of the Empress in the tiara, but it’s not a stretch to think it was truly hers; she had an amazing  a Fabergé brooch with an exquisite and large Siberian aquamarine  which was an engagement present from Nicholas II.


This too was confiscated by the Bolsheviks during the revolution and sold off (we actually know where this one headed off to as it left the hands of the Revolutionists). It was initially purchased by Morris Wartski, an antique dealer based in England that specialized in Russian jewelry and artwork. However, it was auctioned off yet again, this time with a matching necklace and pair of earrings in 1980. And then again at a private sale in 2014 at Christie’s, listed this time as the “property of a European Noble Family.” It’s unknown, at least by those of us considered to be commoners, who owns the Aquamarine Kokoshnik Tiara today.



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« Reply #4915 on: January 26, 2022, 04:58:55 PM »

Russian aquamarine kokoshnik tiara

https://www.katiecallahan...uamarine-kokoshnik-tiara/

Reportedly created for Empress Alexandra Feodorovna (who had some amazing tiaras) around 1900, the tiara features lines and arches of diamonds and also showcases 16 graduated rectangular aquamarine stones set in platinum. We don’t have any photographs of the Empress in the tiara, but it’s not a stretch to think it was truly hers; she had an amazing  a Fabergé brooch with an exquisite and large Siberian aquamarine  which was an engagement present from Nicholas II.


This too was confiscated by the Bolsheviks during the revolution and sold off (we actually know where this one headed off to as it left the hands of the Revolutionists). It was initially purchased by Morris Wartski, an antique dealer based in England that specialized in Russian jewelry and artwork. However, it was auctioned off yet again, this time with a matching necklace and pair of earrings in 1980. And then again at a private sale in 2014 at Christie’s, listed this time as the “property of a European Noble Family.” It’s unknown, at least by those of us considered to be commoners, who owns the Aquamarine Kokoshnik Tiara today.





They should do something like this with QEII's Brazilian aquamarine tiara. Much more clean and modern while still heirloom-looking.
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« Reply #4916 on: January 27, 2022, 12:07:41 AM »

I just did tiara on a baseball cap of Victoria's emerald tiara which is stunning https://www.google.com/se...iYBA#imgrc=YwJpic5E8yQ26M

That sounds really cool!  Can you post a picture of what you did?
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« Reply #4917 on: February 04, 2022, 01:41:05 PM »

Royal Nepal Emerald Tiara


Queen Aishwarya

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« Reply #4918 on: February 05, 2022, 08:09:27 PM »

This is a long but charming talk about four special tiaras:

https://youtu.be/cLwxZmkZIhQ

The tiaras Mr Brown focuses on are the Vladimir; a Sapphire kokoshnik owned by Maria Pavlovna of Russia, the Greville tiara and the Fife tiara.
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« Reply #4919 on: February 16, 2022, 10:13:26 PM »

The Countess of Malmesbury wearing the Malmesbury Tiara   
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/61150507425202974
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