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Author Topic: Wallis Simpson's Fashion&Jewels  (Read 68342 times)
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« on: March 18, 2011, 10:16:54 PM »

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Wallis Simpson's Vintage Fashion to Be Auctioned

It seems Kate Middleton is not the only royal girlfriend whose sheer apparel is considered a valuable artifact.

Later this month, elegant négligées, luggage, Christian Dior handbags and other items once owned by American socialite Wallis Simpson -- the woman whose scandalous affair with Great Britain's King Edward VIII culminated in his 1936 abdication -- will hit the auction block for charity in London, the BBC reports.

The items, which include Louis Vuitton luggage and a "sublime bias cut négligée" are said to give a hint of Simpson's mystifying allure and her storied romance with the former king, which changed the course of monarchal history.

London's Kerry Taylor Auctioneers expects the the pieces to fetch big prices, in much the same way that a lot of the couple's extensive jewelry collection produced record prices last year, selling for $12.5 million.

The latest items up for bid come from the contents of the couple's former Parisian home, which were previously purchased by Egyptian magnate Mohamed al-Fayed.

Fayed, the father of Dodi al-Fayed, who perished with Britain's Princess Diana in a 1997 Paris car crash, plans to donate proceeds from the auction to the Dodi International Foundation, which assists children in need of medical care in the United Kingdom and Egypt.

Some of the soon-to-be auctioned items were gifts the twice-divorced Simpson received from the former king during their affair, which was pivotal in the history of Britain's modern monarchy and the plot line of 2011 Academy Awards Best Picture winner, "The King's Speech."

Actress Eve Best portrayed Simpson in the biopic about her third husband's replacement as monarch, the brave and stuttering King George VI.

Simpson once wrote: "I'm not a beautiful woman. I'm nothing to look at. So the only thing I can do is dress better than everyone else."

So, it seems that some of her evening wardrobe, which includes several sheer nightgowns with coordinating capes was part of her sartorial game plan: "The sublime bias-cut confections that were her nightwear give an intimation of the sensuousness and secret allure of the duchess," a representative of the auction house told the BBC.

The couple's romance has captivated for generations, with pop icon Madonna directing a movie "W.E.," which she co-wrote, about their lives.

http://www.stylelist.com/...-vintage-fashion-auction/


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Controversial Wallis Simpson back in vogue on eve of royal wedding


Jill Lawless Associated Press

LONDON—Watch out, Kate Middleton. Another royal consort is in the limelight as the royal wedding approaches.

Wallis Simpson, the American divorcee who scandalized Britain and brought down a king in the 1930s, is back in style.

She appears as a character in the Oscar-winning film “The King’s Speech” — as the interloper who lures Edward VIII away from royal duties, thrusting his stammering younger brother George onto the throne. She turns up trailing glamour and menace in recent British TV series Upstairs Downstairs and Any Human Heart.

She is the subject of two new biographies, and is the central character in “W.E.,” a forthcoming movie directed by Madonna — one powerful woman examining another.

Her striking sense of style continues to inspire designers, her jewellery sold for eight million pounds ($13 million) at a Sotheby’s auction, and now fans can even buy her lingerie, part of an auction Thursday that also includes a see-through dress worn by Middleton at a student fashion show.

Style icon, romantic heroine, villain — Simpson is an elusive character. Anne Sebba, whose biography That Woman: A Life of Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, will be published in August, says her enduring fascination rests on that sense of mystery.

“Why and how did a middle-aged woman, not conventionally beautiful, beyond child-bearing years and with two living husbands win over a man so forcefully that he gave up not just a throne but an empire to live with her?” Sebba said.

It’s still possible to feel a frisson of the scandal Simpson caused in 1930s Britain. The divorcee from Baltimore was still married to her second husband when she took up with Edward, then the heir to the British throne.

Reports of the affair were censored in Britain. Newspapers did not report it, and American magazines had offending articles cut out before going on sale.

That didn’t stop rumours swirling that Simpson was a spy, a witch, a Nazi sympathizer, a prostitute — she had lived in licentious Shanghai in the 1920s — and even a transsexual.

Torn between duty and passion for Simpson, Edward abdicated the throne in December 1936, announcing in a radio broadcast that “I have found it impossible ... to discharge my duties as king as I would wish to do without the help and support of the woman I love.”

The king’s younger brother unexpectedly became King George VI — the story recounted in “The King’s Speech.”

Edward and Wallis, now the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and suspected by some of Nazi sympathies, were sent to the Bahamas, where he served as governor. After the war they mostly stayed away from Britain, living a life of nomadic luxury.

Many in Britain never forgave Simpson — including George VI’s wife Elizabeth, who became queen and later queen mother.

She blamed Simpson — whom she referred to witheringly as “that woman” — for forcing her husband onto the throne. She felt the stress contributed to his early death from cancer.

George’s widow became one of Britain’s best-loved royals — the “Queen Mum” — and died in 2002 at the age of 101. Plump and maternal, she was, in the popular imagination, everything the Duchess of Windsor was not.

“Wallis had the good clothes,” author Justine Picardie wrote recently in the Daily Telegraph, “but Elizabeth the kind heart,”

Many ordinary Britons shared the queen mother’s animosity toward Wallis Simpson.

She was, novelist Rose Tremain wrote recently, considered “too ambitious, too ruthless, too greedy, too mannish, too sexual, too cruel, too divorced, too pro-German and too American.”

Sebba said that for decades afterward, many people felt “she and the duke had no sense of three old-fashioned words: duty, pluck and responsibility.”

“There was a sense that he put his personal happiness and satisfaction above the call of duty. To the older generation that was really shocking.”

But there has always been another view. Americans, in particular, have tended to see Simpson more sympathetically and celebrate the romance of their love affair.

British writer Sebba, who has had access to previously unseen archive material for her book, acknowledged Simpson “is quite a hard woman to like,” but said she has never been fully understood.

“She was a woman who tried to carve out a life for herself with the cards that history dealt her,” Sebba said.

One of those cards was a highly distinctive sense of style. “I’m not a beautiful woman,” she once wrote. “I’m nothing to look at, so the only thing I can do is dress better than anyone else.” This she proceeded to do, cutting a flawlessly elegant figure in clothes by Christian Dior and others.

Designer Daniella Helayel of Issa — who created the much-copied blue dress Middleton wore for her engagement announcement — has called Simpson “chic and an inspiration.”

One of John Galliano’s last collections for Dior — shown in January, before he was fired for allegedly making racist and anti-Semitic remarks — evoked Simpson’s style with its fur-trimmed tartans and 1940s cuts.

Then there was the amazing jewellery. The besotted Edward showered her with custom-made pieces, the pick of which were sold at Sotheby’s in November: an onyx and diamond Cartier bracelet in the shape of a panther; a jewel-encrusted flamingo clip glittering with rubies, sapphires, emeralds and diamonds; and a heart-shaped emerald, ruby and diamond brooch with the initials W.E. — Wallis and Edward.

Even her lingerie has attracted buyers’ attention. A scarlet chiffon nightdress, complete with a full length cape, is among items being sold Thursday by Kerry Taylor Auctions in London.

As well as Middleton’s dress, the sale has a link to another outsider who scandalized the royal family: Princess Diana.

The items, including a Dior crocodile handbag and a Louis Vuitton vanity case, are being sold in aid of a fund set up by businessman Mohamed Al Fayed, who bought the Windsors’ Paris house and its contents after the duchess died in 1986. Proceeds will go to a children’s charity established in memory of his son, Dodi, who died with Diana in a car crash in Paris in 1997.

http://www.thestar.com/ne...e-on-eve-of-royal-wedding




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« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2011, 10:17:09 PM »

In this handout combo photo released by Kerry Taylor Auctions are: (left to right) a pink chiffon nightdress and matching capelet; an ivory chiffon nightdress, circa 1950 and a scarlet chiffon nightdress with capelet and full length cape, circa late 1940s - early 1950s which form part of a collection of personal items belonging to the late Duchess of Windsor. Lingerie, handbags and luggage once owned by Wallis Simpson, the American divorcee who shook the British monarchy, are due to be auctioned off in London March 17. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.








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« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2011, 10:20:01 PM »

As the Duchess of Windsor's fabulous outfits go under the hammer, we reveal the secrets of Wallis's wardrobe

What I love most of all is the envelope handbag in black crocodile. Its clasp is engraved with a ‘W’ and an ‘S’, with the numbers ‘30 x 1934’ alongside, denoting the date October 30, 1934.

This bag was given to Wallis Simpson by the besotted Edward VIII — but the precise significance of the date — two years before he abdicated the throne to marry her — has never been identified. The label inside says ‘Dior’. Inside, in a tiny crocodile pouch, is a comb.

While I sit, with the relics of an incredible life scattered around me in a huge, freezing warehouse in South London, where Wallis’s outfits have been gathered for auction, I breathe in that slightly musty smell of clothes that have not been worn for decades, and it seems the world has not changed at all, not really.



I peer inside a Louis Vuitton vanity case. It’s like new, with a faux tortoiseshell label with that celebrated name and address etched upon it: The Duchess of Windsor (as she became), 4, Route du Champ d’Entrainement.
The Duchess with a brown alligator handbag, circa 1947-50, with gilt ring swivel clasp

The Duchess holding a brown alligator handbag, circa 1947-50, with gilt ring swivel clasp

The Duchess holding a brown alligator handbag, circa 1947-50, with gilt ring swivel clasp

Everything around me is classic, most items haven’t dated, except perhaps the sweater made from ocelot fur. Ah, and the shoes. They all have a chunky, low heel.

But in front of me, and most exciting of all, is the rail of lingerie: the lace boudoir jackets, the chiffon nightdress and capelet with bobbin lace, an ivory crepe de Chine nightdress, as well as a Marc Bohan for Christian Dior glass droplet beaded evening bolero.

I almost blush when I look at these clothes, made by a Parisienne lingerie shop, to dress her most intimate moments.



There is a gold Cartier atomiser, expected to fetch £5,000, which still has traces of the Duchess’s scent trapped inside. I am able to literally breathe her in.

The negligees and bed jackets, the slips and the capes in pink, black and red reveal a deeply sexual woman, a vamp!

Everything is cut in that very Thirties manner, on the bias, which would have given that small frame — I measure the garments, and she was, indeed, a tiny 31½ -23-30 or a 31, with size 4 feet — the most sensuous curves.

These items from probably the most exquisite wardrobe in the world are being sold later this month in aid of the fund set up by Mohamed al Fayed in memory of his son, Dodi, killed in Paris alongside Princess Diana in 1997.

He bought the Duke and Duchess of Windsor’s house in the Bois de Boulogne, and its contents, after Wallis’s death.

The Dodi International Charitable Foundation helps children in need of medical care, and funds treatment for those with psychological and learning difficulties.

This auction is expected to fetch between £43,000 and £69,000.

Kerry Taylor, who is curating the sale in conjunction with Sotheby’s, also worked on the 1998 Sotheby’s New York Auction of the contents of the house, which the couple moved to in 1952.

She remembers that, when she first entered the Windsor’s Paris home in 1995: ‘It was preserved in aspic, exactly as she left it. It was really a home of two halves. The rooms of the Duke were warm, tasteful with a fatigued elegance.

‘But Wallis’s private rooms — her sitting room, bedroom and dressing room — were unhappy: cold, and crisp, with lots of ice blue.’



Sifting through the clothes and relics, Taylor found that some of Edward’s clothes were darned to death. ‘He had given up his kingdom, his empire, for this woman. He couldn’t bear to throw away anything that bore his old EP (Edward Prince) or EVIII cypher.

‘Wallis’s clothes were in mint condition. She was obsessed with everything being perfect.’
Duchess of Windsor's auctioned possessions

A selection of the possessions being auctioned

Everything in the house was smothered in her and Edward’s initials, and embroidered crown. Almost every item in the auction is stamped with her identity as a Duchess, even the bath mats. And her negligees.

Everywhere are the words: ‘We are too.’ The ‘we’ signifies Wallis and Edward, and the ‘too’ means they were ‘too in love’.

One fascinating item in the auction is a tortoiseshell dressing set, circa 1928, inlaid with the initials WSW in gilt.

The letters are heavy with significance. Bessie Wallis Warfield, an American, was married first, in 1916, to Earl Winfield Spencer, a naval pilot. The marriage was short-lived, and ended in divorce.

She then married Ernest Aldrich Simpson, a businessman, in 1928, hence the initials standing for Wallis Warfield Simpson (the S appears in the middle).

The dressing set was found hidden in a box, discarded in favour of one showing her Duchess’s crown.

But if we needed proof that labels do not make us happy, we need only to look at the life of Mrs Simpson. The gorgeous clothes never made her feel beautiful. ‘She hated her hands,’ says Taylor. ‘We found drawers and drawers of gloves.’

Wallis was trapped in a gilded cage, the couple didn’t have children, she was banished by polite society, there was nothing much for her to do. ‘And so she went shopping,’ says Taylor.

‘She would change her outfit several times a day. Her hairdresser came every day. When she rose in the morning, her sheets were removed, pressed and put back in time for her afternoon nap.’

What Wallis wore always made headlines. ‘She was the first style icon,’ says Kerry. ‘She experimented, she loved clothes, and she moved with the times.’

I pick up a pair of earrings, worn in the Sixties, made from shell and coral with gilt ornate patterned filligree backs, with pendant ‘wish bones’. I tell Kerry they are awful.

‘Wallis, once a leader of fashion, still adopted the latest trend, even in the era of flowing kaftans and psychedelia. Edward, too, was a dandy. He was the first to place a zip-fly in his trousers — he thought a button fly ugly and bulky.

Looking through the archives of Vogue from 1936, Mrs Simpson was never far from its pages. Though coverage in the British edition declined as her affair with King Edward VIII flourished, reflecting how scandalised the country was by the relationship, U.S. Vogue continued its adulation.

Edward was photographed for Vogue by Cecil Beaton, a close friend of the couple, who took their wedding pictures, at the Chateau de Cande, near Tours, in 1937. Beaton remarked: ‘He will not allow himself to be photographed on the right side of his face, and only likes his parting to be shown.’

So, the couple were well suited? ‘Oh yes,’ says Taylor. ‘They were so alike. Very fashion conscious but also self-centred. The time she spent on her appearance reflects a woman who remembered her poor upbringing and was determined to make the best of herself.’

In a corner of the warehouse is a giant poster of Kate Middleton. She is in that black, sheer dress she wore for that student fashion show. This dress will be sold alongside the nightdresses, bags and cases of Wallis Simpson. The sheer dress is expected to fetch £10,000.

Kate has already been inspired by Wallis Simpson, Taylor says, explaining the wrap dress she wore for the announcement of her engagement to William, for example, was based on a dress worn by the Duchess in the Thirties by U.S. designer Mainbocher.

Maybe in 50 or 80 years’ time, someone like me will be marvelling at Kate’s comb, laughing at her shoes, breathing in her scent.

I place the sheer dress back on its rail, grateful to be in at the beginning, not just the end, of a royal love story.  

The auction, Passion for Fashion, will be held at La Galleria, 30 Royal Opera Arcade, Pall Mall, London SW1 at 2pm on March 17. See kerrytaylorauctions.com

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.u...rdrobe.html#ixzz1GzLD3lRI






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« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2011, 10:29:31 PM »

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Wallis v Elizabeth: the warring wives of Windsor
Right now the world can't get enough of Wallis Simpson – or her undying feud with the late Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. Justine Picardie looks back at the two rivals' starkly different temperaments and taste in fashion

By Justine Picardie 7:00AM GMT 13 Mar 2011

It is 75 years since the abdication of King Edward VIII, and all the central characters in the drama are now dead, yet the story seems to have lost nothing of its power to fascinate. Indeed, a new generation of audiences has been absorbed by the award-winning re-telling of the tale in The King's Speech, and there will be more to come this summer, with Madonna's take on Wallis Simpson in her forthcoming film W.E.. We have seen Wallis reinterpreted through the lens of fashion – in Dior's pre-fall 2011 collection – and name-checked as a muse by Daniella Helayel, the Issa designer responsible for Kate Middleton's blue engagement dress; while pieces from Wallis's own wardrobe are to be auctioned in London this week, including her scarlet and shocking-pink lingerie and a Dior black crocodile handbag. Then there was Wallis portrayed by Gillian Anderson in the television adaptation of William Boyd's novel, Any Human Heart, and Wallis defended on the BBC by Andrea Riseborough, the star of Madonna's new film ('she was a very good woman'), and the last days of Wallis will be told in a new book by the late Queen Mother's biographer, Hugo Vickers, to be published next month.

But for all the variations, the essential theme remains as it ever was: Wallis Simpson, the American interloper, chic in little black dress and pearls, thin as a pin and sharp as a knife, black hair like a helmet, red lipstick in a slash across the face, vampiric white skin; Elizabeth, the Duchess of York, soon to be the Queen consort, plump in pastels and matching hat, a sweet English rose who was to bloom as Her Majesty, matriarch of the Royal family and Queen Mum to a nation. Wallis had the good clothes, but Elizabeth the kind heart, as reflected by Helena Bonham Carter as the heroine of The King's Speech.

If every generation needs to repeat the old story of the King and Mrs Simpson – a cautionary tale, among other things, of what might be lost by marrying for love – then the origins of the myth are increasingly obscured by the accretions of folklore. The Duke of Windsor, demoted from King after his brief reign in 1936, has been variously described as a pleasure-seeking playboy and a spineless masochist, who gave up the Crown for a woman of such controversial character that she was forever cast as the wicked witch. A Nazi spy, lesbian hermaphrodite, man in disguise, nymphomaniac who learnt her sexual tricks in Shanghai: all these lurid accusations have been levelled at Wallis, and much else besides. (According to the Special Branch of Scotland Yard, she had a secret affair with a man named Trundle in 1935, while still married to her second husband Ernest Simpson and already conducting a relationship with the Prince of Wales; and there were suggestions that she was also involved with Hitler's ambassador to London at the time, Joachim von Ribbentrop.)

The twists and turns of the narrative could provide a dozen film plots – and almost certainly will – but there is another prism through which to examine this intriguing saga: the costume drama of Elizabeth and Mrs Simpson, in which their clothes provide as many clues as their letters and conversation. Both women had a marked sense of personal style that went further than mere decorum; their identities were made clear by what they wore and how they wore it, in a manner that had more to do with self-definition than passing fashion. Each always looked entirely herself – and the polar opposite of the other.

That they were rivals, however different in style, is an inherent element of their interwoven stories; the antagonism forming a curious common ground, compounded by their linked destinies through marriage to royal siblings. Indeed, not long before the announcement of the engagement of the Duke of York to Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon at the beginning of 1923 the papers had carried reports that she was, in fact, to marry his brother, the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VIII). Hence the suggestion, half a century later, by Diana Mosley [née Mitford] that Elizabeth's enduring antipathy to Wallis was fuelled by jealousy. In a letter to her sister, the Duchess of Devonshire, written soon after the death of the Duke of Windsor in 1972, Diana (Wallis's friend and future biographer) observed: 'the theory of their contemporaries that Cake [the Mitford sisters' nickname for Elizabeth, derived from her sweet tooth and healthy appetite] was rather in love with him (as a girl) & took second best, may account for much.'

Edward himself was initially rather sceptical about his brother's choice: 'Little Elizabeth Lyon, the future Duchess of York, I don't think…' But by the autumn of 1923 their contemporary Duff Cooper reported in his diary that the Prince, in the midst of complaining about 'the gloom of Buckingham Palace' and his 'bad-tempered' father, was cheered by the presence of his young sister-in-law: 'The Duchess of York is the one bright spot there, they all love her and the King is in a good temper whenever she is there.'

Not that anyone seemed to take Elizabeth very seriously at the beginning, aside from her devoted husband. At her pre-wedding ball, the Prime Minister, H H Asquith, described 'the poor little bride' as being 'completely overshadowed'; while her wedding dress, designed by Madame Handley Seymour, was – in the words of her biographer, Hugo Vickers – 'abysmal in its dowdiness'. Virginia Woolf, observing the Duchess of York at the theatre one evening in December 1929, was dismissive with faint praise: 'a simple, chattering sweet-hearted little woman in pink: but her wrist twinkling with diamonds…'

A little over a year later, when Mrs Simpson first entered the orbit of the Prince of Wales, she could not have presented herself in a more dissimilar form to his sister-in-law Elizabeth. Wallis was not a beauty, by her own admission: 'Nobody ever called me beautiful or even pretty,' she wrote in her memoirs. 'My jaw was clearly too big and too pointed to be classic. My hair was straight when the laws of compensation might at least have provided curls.' But she was undeniably stylish, as recognised by Cecil Beaton, who also noted that she was 'alluring' , her skin 'incredibly bright and smooth like the inside of a shell, her hair as sleek as only the Chinese women know how to make it'. And her effect on Edward was devastating; his equerry, Sir John Aird, lamented that the Prince 'has lost all confidence in himself and follows W around like a dog'.

Elizabeth, however, considered Wallis to be 'the lowest of the low, a thoroughly immoral woman' from the start, and did her best to avoid meeting her. 'I do not feel I can make advances to her and ask her to the house,' she wrote to her mother-in-law, Queen Mary, 'and this fact is bound to make relations a little difficult.' When the two women did happen to encounter each other in 1935 – at Edward's country retreat, Fort Belvedere – it was with disastrous consequences. The Duchess of York walked into a room, only to discover Mrs Simpson doing an imitation of her. Wallis dubbed Elizabeth 'the Dowdy Duchess', or 'the fat Scottish cook', while Elizabeth simply called her 'that woman' or 'a certain person'. Their mutual antipathy hardened into distrust, bitterness and lasting resentment as the abdication crisis unfolded, following the death of King George V in January 1936. That summer, while the Yorks took on the duties of public life, Mrs Simpson dominated Edward's life as the new King. In August he set off with Mrs Simpson on a yachting trip around the Mediterranean, where Duff Cooper and his wife Diana witnessed the embarrassment of the King getting down on all fours to release the hem of Mrs Simpson's dress from under a chair, while she berated him for his supposed failings. Diana Cooper wearied of Wallis – 'her commonness and her Becky Sharpness irritate' – but also believed that 'Wallis is bored stiff with the King'.

By November 1936, as it became clear that Edward could not be dissuaded from marrying Wallis, Elizabeth wrote to Queen Mary: 'I feel quite overcome with horror & emotion… One feels so helpless against such obstinacy.' She was, she told a trusted friend, 'very depressed and miserable', while her husband expressed his darkest fears to his brother's Private Secretary: 'If the worst happens & I have to take over, you can be assured that I will do my best to clear up the inevitable mess, if the whole fabric does not crumble under the shock and strain of it all.'

When the King made his abdication speech on 11 December 1936, Elizabeth was stricken with flu in bed, but wrote to him: 'We are all overcome with misery, and can only pray that you will find happiness in your new life.' The coronation of the new King, George VI, was set for 12 May 1937, and he and his wife made it evident that Edward and his mistress – by then living in France – would not be welcome; nor would Wallis be granted the title Her Royal Highness.

Despite – or perhaps because of – this snub, the arrangements for the wedding of Edward and Wallis continued regardless, though the timing could not have been worse. The decree absolute of her divorce had only come through nine days before the coronation, but Wallis pressed forward with ordering her trousseau, considering designs by Schiaparelli and Chanel, and finally settling on Mainbocher for the wedding dress, which was to be blue – christened 'Wallis blue' by the couturier. On 11 May, the eve of his brother's coronation, Edward held a press conference in a French château to announce his formal engagement to Wallis. According to the American author Charles Higham, 'On the evening of the 12th, Wallis and the duke listened to King George's hesitant post-coronation broadcast; outside, a heavy rainstorm lashed the château while the duke knitted a blue sweater for Wallis, plying the needles busily.' Higham, it must be said, offers a lurid account of the Duke as a bisexual fascist with a penchant for crocheting; his report of the lead-up to their wedding may be uncorroborated, but it is undeniably intriguing: 'Representatives of Van Cleef and Arpels arrived from Paris with trays of jewellery, followed by a case of gems, an inscribed gold box from Hitler… and costly gifts from Mussolini.' Cecil Beaton arrived to take photographs the day before the wedding ceremony on 3 June, and wrote in his diary that 'I find her intelligent within her vast limitations… She has obviously a tremendous admiration for the Duke… and is determined to love him, though I feel she is not in love with him.'

Beaton had also been in London for the coronation, less than three weeks previously, where he had watched the arrival of the Royal Glass Coach. 'Inside sitting high on crimson satin cushions sat Their Majesties, white and waxen, the King slightly deathlike with cadaverous face leaning forward with an ermine cap on his head. The Queen looked much lovelier than any of her photographs & her unaccustomed pallor was moving.'

While the Duke and Duchess of Windsor seemed somehow reduced in their subsequent exile abroad – she thinner than ever, he more shrunken than before – the King and Queen appeared strengthened by their crowning. Reports of Elizabeth's previously frequent bouts of flu lessened (a precursor of her robust good health in later life, and apparent impatience with those who complained of ill health around her). And her wardrobe choices became more confident, with a new choice of couturier, Norman Hartnell, who designed the Queen's famous all-white wardrobe to Paris for the State Visit in July 1938. Her mother, Lady Strathmore, had died the previous month, but black was deemed too funereal for Elizabeth to wear to Paris; the choice of white, however, had some precedent for royal mourning (le deuil blanc of French queens).
The French were unusually impressed by her dignity and elegance; Duff Cooper, the future ambassador to Paris, observed: 'Everyone says that the Queen has something magnetic about her which touches the masses as well as the lucky few who know her.' But the Duke and Duchess of Windsor were nowhere to be seen, having been advised that the Royal couple would not receive them in Paris or elsewhere.

The rift had been deepened by the Windsors' trip to Germany the previous year, when they met Hitler and other Nazi leaders. The ostensible reason was for the Duke to study the working conditions of the German labour force; but his official biographer, Philip Ziegler, writes that the visit was more likely inspired by the desire to impress Wallis: 'He wanted to prove to the Duchess that, even though she had not married a King, she was at least the wife of someone who commanded the respect of a major power… In Germany at least he could be sure of a proper welcome and, more significantly, so could the Duchess.'

By October 1939 Elizabeth was open (at least in a letter to a family member) in associating Edward with the Nazi leader. 'Odd creature, he is exactly like Hitler in thinking that anybody who doesn't agree with him is automatically wrong.' But still, according to a senior British diplomat who had discussed the Windsors' embarrassing foreign activities with the King and Queen, 'she had not a word to say for "that woman" '.

It was a phrase that was to have a curious echo over half a century later, when as Queen Mother she was known to refer to Diana, Princess of Wales simply as 'that Spencer woman'; perhaps as a shrewd recognition of the risk she posed to the stability of the monarchy, or possibly because of the faint reminder she saw in Diana of the glamorous, chic adversary that Wallis had once represented. By this point the Duchess of Windsor had departed, after a lingering living death in Paris in 1986; and Elizabeth's husband was long dead, too (gone to an early grave in 1952, for which she blamed the stress of his unsought reign, brought about by the actions of the Windsors).

Did the enmity between the two sides of the family ever thaw? Up to a point. When the Duke of Windsor was suffering from terminal cancer in 1972, the Queen, Prince Philip and Prince Charles did viist him and the Duchess of Windsor at their home in the Bois de Boulogne during their state visit to France. Not long afterwards the Duke died. His funeral took place at St George's Chapel, Windsor, on 5 June – just after the Windsors' 35th wedding anniversary – and the Duchess stayed at Buckingham Palace, although she only met the Queen Mother on the day that Edward was buried. Both women wore black, Wallis bird-like in Givenchy, Elizabeth stately with a veil over her head, her expression unknowable, and her words to Wallis unheard…

http://www.telegraph.co.u...ing-wives-of-Windsor.html
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« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2011, 11:07:10 PM »

Awful couple, but I love her sense of style.
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« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2011, 03:18:33 AM »

Disgusting. I do not like seeing a Nazi collaborator and Jew hater idolised in any way. 
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Miss Waynfleet

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« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2011, 10:35:38 AM »

Most of the people think of the great "Lovestory" but didn´t know what really happened, why the British government kicked them out of UK. There was a docu about them weeks ago. Edward felt betrayed by his brother Bertie but blamed Elizabeth for his exile.
He didn´t realized that he was so wrong.
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« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2011, 02:39:44 PM »

Disgusting. I do not like seeing a Nazi collaborator and Jew hater idolised in any way. 

I don't like her as a person but I do like her sense of style. Same with Coco Chanel and John Galliano. Does it make sense?  Thinking
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« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2011, 02:41:09 PM »

Disgusting. I do not like seeing a Nazi collaborator and Jew hater idolised in any way. 

I don't like her as a person but I do like her sense of style. Same with Coco Chanel and John Galliano. Does it make sense?  Thinking

Oh yes.  I love her fashion sense.  But I think she is absolutely deplorable.
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« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2011, 02:46:30 PM »

Thank you. I think she really made her mark in the fashion world especially with her jewels but I'm not a fan of her.  Smiley
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« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2011, 02:53:07 PM »















http://www.dailymail.co.u...els-display-Sothebys.html

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« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2011, 03:01:02 PM »

This is my favourite jewel of her, it came from Q. Mary 









Others:









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« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2011, 12:03:17 AM »

Most of the people think of the great "Lovestory" but didn´t know what really happened, why the British government kicked them out of UK. There was a docu about them weeks ago. Edward felt betrayed by his brother Bertie but blamed Elizabeth for his exile.
He didn´t realized that he was so wrong.

It's worth putting some effort into finding out about these two. The reason QM Elizabeth never forgave them is NOT that she was particularly hurt emotionally, but was aware that they were traitors of the worst kind. She had state information that was not on the public record until many years later.  They were lucky not to be tried and executed. They were actively conniving with the Nazis to regain the British throne. That is why they had to be exiled to an actual island where their activities could be curtailed during the war.

There have been enough books and documentaries published by now, that it's nonsense for Madonna or anyone else to state that they "don't know of anything substantively negative  about Wallis Simpson" ...
 
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« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2011, 10:44:18 AM »

Others:

WOW! 
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