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Author Topic: THE BOOK THREAD  (Read 27622 times)
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Chris

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« Reply #90 on: August 04, 2007, 08:26:00 PM »

I recall reading Tolkiens "The Hobitt" when I was a child
but only came as far as when the trolls lead the terrified
ponies into the mountain to be eaten. I threw the book
away and never did warm up to the author again.  Angry
DoS

Did you read it in English or in Danish?

Why?

DoS

Just curious.  Danes start English classes while in elementary school, I believe.  I just wondered if you were able to read it in English or in Danish.
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Daughter of Struense
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« Reply #91 on: August 04, 2007, 08:38:09 PM »

I recall reading Tolkiens "The Hobitt" when I was a child
but only came as far as when the trolls lead the terrified
ponies into the mountain to be eaten. I threw the book
away and never did warm up to the author again.  Angry
DoS

Did you read it in English or in Danish?

Why?

DoS

Just curious.  Danes start English classes while in elementary school, I believe.  I just wondered if you were able to read it in English or in Danish.

Why? As you stated before, you do not believe
I am danish, so why ask?

DoS
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Chris

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« Reply #92 on: August 04, 2007, 08:39:46 PM »

I recall reading Tolkiens "The Hobitt" when I was a child
but only came as far as when the trolls lead the terrified
ponies into the mountain to be eaten. I threw the book
away and never did warm up to the author again.  Angry
DoS

Did you read it in English or in Danish?

Why?

DoS

Just curious.  Danes start English classes while in elementary school, I believe.  I just wondered if you were able to read it in English or in Danish.

Why? As you stated before, you do not believe
I am danish, so why ask?

DoS

Good grief!
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fairy

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« Reply #93 on: August 08, 2007, 10:13:35 PM »

Hey, DoS
I like your list of books, I love the books by the Brontee sisters and loved Karen Blixen (even though I found the book, "out of Africa" somehow different from what I had in my mind)
Did you like the "shipping news" I have it bedside, but since the film was so strange, I can't bring myselfto reading it.
BTW, I have always wondered if te translations can really capture the essence of a book. I mean so much is simply between the lines, the way words are woven into a fabric of a tale isn't that exactly what makes or breaks a writer ? In the translation some one else chooses the words and the synthax, is that really the same?
In some cases I found, that I loved the original but hated the translation and funnily enough sometimes it was quite the opposite....
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Mary's life motto:
"if I had the choice between world peace and a Prada handbag, I'd choose the latter one" Marian Keyes.
Daughter of Struense
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« Reply #94 on: August 08, 2007, 10:38:26 PM »

Hey, DoS
I like your list of books, I love the books by the Brontee sisters and loved Karen Blixen (even though I found the book, "out of Africa" somehow different from what I had in my mind)
Did you like the "shipping news" I have it bedside, but since the film was so strange, I can't bring myselfto reading it.
BTW, I have always wondered if te translations can really capture the essence of a book. I mean so much is simply between the lines, the way words are woven into a fabric of a tale isn't that exactly what makes or breaks a writer ? In the translation some one else chooses the words and the synthax, is that really the same?
In some cases I found, that I loved the original but hated the translation and funnily enough sometimes it was quite the opposite....

Thank you. I love reading "The Shipping News" but mainly
because it is so different from the film. God, it was weird.  Nerves
I am a big fan of E. Annie Proulx and her writingstyle. But I am not
looking forward to reading about a certain scene.  Sad
I agree about translations. So much of the original author can get
lost if the translator is not careful. That is why I try to read as much as I can
in the original language. I recall several books I could not make heads
or tail of until I read them in English, among them "Wuthering Heights".
But having read childrensbooks in Danish, I found as an adult that the
original in English sometimes was disappointing. I guess as a child I was
very conservative, but I understand you perfectly.
Karen Blixen translated her books herself, so they were identical,
but I agree that the book was very different from the film.

DoS
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Plum Royale

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« Reply #95 on: August 21, 2007, 04:54:00 AM »

 I saw this manuel erm book at B&N  this afternoon and I just had to share with you dahlings,
 the author has included Diana and Jackie  and her daughter-in law Carolyn but alas no Mosh  Dead we'll have to wait for a revised version after the
divorce!   from the NRO online as source
 Please to enjoy girls!

Marrying Up
The Art of Fortune Hunting.

A review by Myrna Blyth


Since Cinderella it has been the oldest happy ending in the world: Poor girl marries rich guy. But is it really such a happy ending? That’s one of the questions Charlotte Hays exams in her dishy new book The Fortune Hunters: Dazzling Women and the Men They Married. And though the rap may be that such women are ditzy gold diggers, Hays has considerable respect for those who make what are considered to be “fabulous marriages.” According to her, these brides are shrewd, calculating, focused ,and as relentless as any tycoon trying to land and close the deal of his life.



Of course one needs some basic equipment to be a successful Fortune Hunter. Most have considerable man-pleasing skills of the most traditional type, best demonstrated in the kitchen — yes, several of them are great cooks and coddlers — and in the bedroom. But though beauty counts, high spirits, and daring can make up for it. Mercedes Bass, for example, who caught the eye of Texas billionaire Sid Bass, is far from gorgeous. She managed to get him to notice her by throwing a dinner roll in his direction.

Most of these gals worked darn hard for their money. Some married and married and married until they got it right. Or at least got the gold-plated bank account they always wanted. After all, marrying a man with big money has always been the appropriate mate for smart girls. And though Mr. Darcy’s five-thousand pounds a year did not particularly appeal to the noble Elizabeth Bennet, Jane Austen knew it would certainly make him a hero to her female readers and the right match for her heroine.

The hard workers of The Fortune Hunters include Carol McDonald Portago Carey-Hughes Pistell Petrie, a blonde, still pretty as a 70-something New York socialite, who after trying and trying finally ended up the wife and then widow of Milton Petrie, a diminutive cigar-chewing, gin-rummy-playing, ragtrade millionaire. Another is the perennially girlish Marylou Schoeder Hosford Whitney, who married the rich but unappealing Cornelius “Sonny” Vanderbilt, a man “who got a bang out of being picked up in public places by his wife.” At the end of their marriage Marylou nursed the bi-polar Sonny through ten years of Alzheimer’s. She inherited $100 million. The Hollywood columnist Sheilah Graham, who was F. Scott Fitzgerald’s lover and also wrote a book about women who married millionaires, once declared that she, personally, would rather scrub floors.

There is also Gayfryd Steinberg, a gorgeous brunette, who started out as a hostess in a restaurant in New Orleans. She married a wealthy businessman who got in trouble with the IRS. She divorced him and, the next day, married insurance billionaire Saul Steinberg. In the 1980s Gayfryd became a famous New York hostess, giving parties that make even today’s hedge fund-er’s socializing look small-scale. She gave a wedding reception for her stepdaughter at the Metropolitan Museum of Art where the bill for flowers alone was reported to be one million dollars. She also gave a multi-million dollar birthday party for her husband — “a chubby corporate raider who in formal attire looked rather like a frog going to a ball,” as Hays records it.

At that party scantily-clad actors recreated the Old Master paintings that hung in the living room of the Steinberg’s sumptuous apartment, then the most expensive in New York. But Steinberg’s fortune fell apart. He suffered a stroke. Their Old Masters and the 34-room apartment was sold. Blackstone’s Steve Schwarzman and his wife now live there. But Gayfryd, surprising everyone, stayed with Saul and remains devoted to him.

Hays also includes several women whose marriages could not be considered good news for either bride or groom: Princess Diana, as well as Wallis Simpson, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, and Carolyn Bessette Kennedy. And she also chronicles two other women — both redheads, Arianna Huffington and Georgette Mossbacher — whose marriages to rich men were stepping stones, not to even more lucrative relationships, but to interesting careers of their own.

So are Arianna and Georgette the wave of the future? Is the day of the relentless female Fortune Hunter fading? A new report notes that educated young women in big cities are earning more than young men and are probably focused on building their own fortunes. Yet I don’t doubt that mothers are still advising their daughters that it is just as easy to love a rich man as a poor man, and updated Darcys remain the heroes of almost every new chicklit book that’s being published these days. And with a billionaire across the table and a dinner roll at hand, I wouldn’t be surprised if most shrewd, calculating, focused young women might still give it a toss.

Plum Nono
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sj007

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« Reply #96 on: September 17, 2007, 05:31:24 PM »

Has anyone read this book yet?

"How Luxury Lost Its Luster" by Dana Thomas

http://www.amazon.com/Del...qid=1190042443&sr=1-1


I saw it yesterday in a bookstore.  Looks interesting.   The Prada name on the cover sucked me inside to read the inside book jacket summary.
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