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Author Topic: Duchess of Cambridge shopping  (Read 347825 times)
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Ghost

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« Reply #1155 on: April 12, 2018, 08:35:30 AM »

I think nowhere in Europe is a cart free anymore. It is not about the deposit (I think all stores offer a plastic token to use instead of a coin) but about bringing back your cart in line after putting the groceries in your car. It goes also for DIY stores.
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kpzra

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« Reply #1156 on: April 12, 2018, 08:43:05 AM »

Every grocery store I've been to asks if I'd like help to my car, and they also refuse tips (I've required such help recently after undergoing a shoulder surgery).

But usually I just order my groceries online, pick a time window, pull into a numbered parking spot at that time, and they wheel out and load up my car, and I drive off. It costs $5 and it's the best $5 I've ever spent. I have a large family so this truly saves me 2 hours of painful pushing a shopping cart every week. win!

I'm gathering other countries don't do that kind of service heh. I read recently that you have to put in a deposit for a shopping cart in some stores in lots of countries. I'm sure there's some future scenario in which that would conceivably happen in the US, but I'd personally stagger around the store juggling food before I messed with a cart deposit.
I guess you've never been to an Aldi then. It's a quarter to unlock a cart and you get it back when you return it. The only.place in the US I've had my groceries brought to my car is the military commissary.  In 4 states no other place has offered.
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« Reply #1157 on: April 12, 2018, 09:14:10 AM »

Here in the UK at shops like Tesco and Waitrose you can scan your shopping with a handheld device (or your smartphone) as you shop and pack it into your bags as you put items into your trolley. Then, at the end, you hand back the device, pay and leave. No loading and re-loading all your shopping! Fantastic!!

Most supermarkets also do home delivery...you can pay an annual fee or it's about 5 a delivery. A lot of people do this. .Click and Collect. (from the shop) is not so popular.
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cordtx

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« Reply #1158 on: April 12, 2018, 09:24:18 AM »

I think nowhere in Europe is a cart free anymore. It is not about the deposit (I think all stores offer a plastic token to use instead of a coin) but about bringing back your cart in line after putting the groceries in your car. It goes also for DIY stores.

I don't understand why anyone would want to steal a shopping cart?
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Margaret

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« Reply #1159 on: April 12, 2018, 09:32:45 AM »

Every grocery store I've been to asks if I'd like help to my car, and they also refuse tips (I've required such help recently after undergoing a shoulder surgery).

But usually I just order my groceries online, pick a time window, pull into a numbered parking spot at that time, and they wheel out and load up my car, and I drive off. It costs $5 and it's the best $5 I've ever spent. I have a large family so this truly saves me 2 hours of painful pushing a shopping cart every week. win!

I'm gathering other countries don't do that kind of service heh. I read recently that you have to put in a deposit for a shopping cart in some stores in lots of countries. I'm sure there's some future scenario in which that would conceivably happen in the US, but I'd personally stagger around the store juggling food before I messed with a cart deposit.
I guess you've never been to an Aldi then. It's a quarter to unlock a cart and you get it back when you return it. The only.place in the US I've had my groceries brought to my car is the military commissary.  In 4 states no other place has offered.

I shop at Aldi sometimes and I don't mind paying the deposit and taking the trolley back because not having to have staff to run around collecting trolleys  helps save cost which in turn helps them keep their prices low. But elsewhere, with one exception I know of, the trolleys are almost free, but that means they're left scattered about the place by people who won't take them to a trolley bay.  I'm happy to wheel a trolley around because I like shopping in supermarkets.  I like to have the choice, and to be able to read labels, and for that reason I don't use the online services that allow you to order in advance and just drive up and collect your stuff.  What I object to is the checkouts you have to use yourself.  They're not so bad if there is enough room for one trolley on each side of the the checkout console  so you can put your bags of packed goods into the second one while you finish scanning the rest of your purchases that are still in the first, but our local IGA store has machines with only enough room for one trolley, so if you have a large load there's nowhere to put the bags of goods you've put through the machine and it's a struggle to pack, too.  Luckily there are so many stubborn shoppers in our area who refuse to use the self-service checkouts that there is always one staff-attended checkout even if you have to wait a while for it.  

I don't understand why a very pregnant Kate would someone with her to help her and put her shopping into her car herself, or why she'd even be going to the supermarket herself.  "Purchasing groceries and general provisions for the house" were some of the duties William and Kate nominated when they advertised for a new butler/housekeeper/maid/cook/child-carer/dog-carer in 2015.
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« Reply #1160 on: April 12, 2018, 09:34:09 AM »

I think nowhere in Europe is a cart free anymore. It is not about the deposit (I think all stores offer a plastic token to use instead of a coin) but about bringing back your cart in line after putting the groceries in your car. It goes also for DIY stores.

I don't understand why anyone would want to steal a shopping cart?

To take them away and toss them into ditches, creeks, and such like.  That's what happens to a lot of them here.
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« Reply #1161 on: April 12, 2018, 09:43:06 AM »

Here in the UK at shops like Tesco and Waitrose you can scan your shopping with a handheld device (or your smartphone) as you shop and pack it into your bags as you put items into your trolley. Then, at the end, you hand back the device, pay and leave. No loading and re-loading all your shopping! Fantastic!!

Most supermarkets also do home delivery...you can pay an annual fee or it's about 5 a delivery. A lot of people do this. .Click and Collect. (from the shop) is not so popular.

To be honest I haven't seen too many shopping carts/trolleys in a long while (the large ones where you need a coin). Most shops I've been to in the past couple of years only offer a tiny basket or a larger basket with wheels and a handle. Never seen anyone offer to pack the car but can't without a doubt say that it didn't happen somewhere. Home delivery is brilliant. I don't even feel like hauling large amounts of stuff (you know all those necessities that take up room, toilet paper, paper kitchen towels etc.) home myself anymore because it is so much easier to have Tesco deliver them at home. I haven't yet seen the handheld devices but often use self-service checkouts when buying only a few items.

For sure Kate had the option to have all the shopping done for her but it just might be she wanted to get out of the house and rather enjoyed doing it herself. Her staff must have felt it's also good PR but I doubt they go to her and suggest a shopping trip to "boost the ratings".
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« Reply #1162 on: April 12, 2018, 01:23:23 PM »

Every grocery store I've been to asks if I'd like help to my car, and they also refuse tips (I've required such help recently after undergoing a shoulder surgery).

But usually I just order my groceries online, pick a time window, pull into a numbered parking spot at that time, and they wheel out and load up my car, and I drive off. It costs $5 and it's the best $5 I've ever spent. I have a large family so this truly saves me 2 hours of painful pushing a shopping cart every week. win!

I'm gathering other countries don't do that kind of service heh. I read recently that you have to put in a deposit for a shopping cart in some stores in lots of countries. I'm sure there's some future scenario in which that would conceivably happen in the US, but I'd personally stagger around the store juggling food before I messed with a cart deposit.
I guess you've never been to an Aldi then. It's a quarter to unlock a cart and you get it back when you return it. The only.place in the US I've had my groceries brought to my car is the military commissary.  In 4 states no other place has offered.

I shop at Aldi sometimes and I don't mind paying the deposit and taking the trolley back because not having to have staff to run around collecting trolleys  helps save cost which in turn helps them keep their prices low. But elsewhere, with one exception I know of, the trolleys are almost free, but that means they're left scattered about the place by people who won't take them to a trolley bay.  I'm happy to wheel a trolley around because I like shopping in supermarkets.  I like to have the choice, and to be able to read labels, and for that reason I don't use the online services that allow you to order in advance and just drive up and collect your stuff.  What I object to is the checkouts you have to use yourself.  They're not so bad if there is enough room for one trolley on each side of the the checkout console  so you can put your bags of packed goods into the second one while you finish scanning the rest of your purchases that are still in the first, but our local IGA store has machines with only enough room for one trolley, so if you have a large load there's nowhere to put the bags of goods you've put through the machine and it's a struggle to pack, too.  Luckily there are so many stubborn shoppers in our area who refuse to use the self-service checkouts that there is always one staff-attended checkout even if you have to wait a while for it.  

I don't understand why a very pregnant Kate would someone with her to help her and put her shopping into her car herself, or why she'd even be going to the supermarket herself.  "Purchasing groceries and general provisions for the house" were some of the duties William and Kate nominated when they advertised for a new butler/housekeeper/maid/cook/child-carer/dog-carer in 2015.

Exactly why this is so baffling. It also goes quite against the Cambs' modus operanti, those two are quite grand, esp Kate. Kate didn't even have money to pay for crisps a few years ago, because "like the queen she doesn't want to carry money".
Someone else pointed out before that K always has a pap call after her last official/ public engagement and before delivery, doing "sth normal", and a pap is on call and gets quite good and close pics, e.g. the pics of her playing with G before she gave birth to C.
And this is exactly that, nothing else but a staged pap walk along with a possible positive image turnout "they're like us! she does it herself! they're/ she is so environmentally conscious using reusable bags!"

I think nowhere in Europe is a cart free anymore. It is not about the deposit (I think all stores offer a plastic token to use instead of a coin) but about bringing back your cart in line after putting the groceries in your car. It goes also for DIY stores.

I don't understand why anyone would want to steal a shopping cart?

It's not about theft, no one steals them, also you don't have to use money, you can use plastic or metal chips/ coins.
It's about making sure that people wheel the trolleys back into the bay and not leave them on the parking lot.
Works superbly in Europe.

But for people who may steal them, the "fee" is so small, it's not going to stop anyone. Usually the people you see with a stolen trolley are homeless people, but even that is a rare sight and not really that prevalent or an issue.
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« Reply #1163 on: April 12, 2018, 04:11:45 PM »

in nyc the homeless use the shopping carts.  also, people who collect plastic bottles and glass bottles use them to transport to the machines that pay you for those items.
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lothwen

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« Reply #1164 on: April 12, 2018, 04:57:05 PM »

I think nowhere in Europe is a cart free anymore. It is not about the deposit (I think all stores offer a plastic token to use instead of a coin) but about bringing back your cart in line after putting the groceries in your car. It goes also for DIY stores.

I don't understand why anyone would want to steal a shopping cart?

Around here it's the homeless who take the carts so they can cart around their belongings
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« Reply #1165 on: April 14, 2018, 05:32:25 AM »

I think nowhere in Europe is a cart free anymore. It is not about the deposit (I think all stores offer a plastic token to use instead of a coin) but about bringing back your cart in line after putting the groceries in your car. It goes also for DIY stores.

I don't understand why anyone would want to steal a shopping cart?

You must not have ever been to the US then. No offense meant but the homeless take these carts a lot. Also stupid people who are being morons steal them.
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wisdomheaven

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« Reply #1166 on: April 14, 2018, 05:40:49 AM »

Not just the homeless, but also kids messing around and using them to race down hills  Secret
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