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Author Topic: Zara Phillips & Michael Tindall NEWS  (Read 561606 times)
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Oh_Caroline

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« Reply #2325 on: April 30, 2021, 06:44:36 PM »

'She's always been the rock of our family'

@miketindall13 praises his mum Linda as he discusses the effect Parkinson's disease has had on his dad.

He has joined forces with the Duchess of Gloucester for a video conversation to mark World Parkinson's Day.

https://twitter.com/gmb/s.../1388011707210080257?s=21

I have slowly come to have no use for people who are "stoic" and won't have help.     

I'm sure Mike's mom is a nice & good woman, but being the only one to do it all for the seriously ill patient is just not good.



I tend to agree as there's no shame is accepting genuine offers of help.  Caregiver burnout is a really thing and given the past year caregivers are at an even greater risk.  Plus these long term conditions make it very hard on everyone...I believe Mr. Tindall was diagnosed in 2003 so that 18 years that she been "the rock".
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« Reply #2326 on: April 30, 2021, 07:30:59 PM »

'She's always been the rock of our family'

@miketindall13 praises his mum Linda as he discusses the effect Parkinson's disease has had on his dad.

He has joined forces with the Duchess of Gloucester for a video conversation to mark World Parkinson's Day.

https://twitter.com/gmb/s.../1388011707210080257?s=21

I have slowly come to have no use for people who are "stoic" and won't have help.     

I'm sure Mike's mom is a nice & good woman, but being the only one to do it all for the seriously ill patient is just not good.



I tend to agree as there's no shame is accepting genuine offers of help.  Caregiver burnout is a really thing and given the past year caregivers are at an even greater risk.  Plus these long term conditions make it very hard on everyone...I believe Mr. Tindall was diagnosed in 2003 so that 18 years that she been "the rock".

PD usually developes slowly over a number of years. If Mike's father was diagnosed early his daily life was not too much affected. I've known a few people who have done their 'bucket list' during the early stages. As the disease progresses  - at stage 4 and 5 assistance is required. Like Mike, I've known at least one wife who did it on her own - but she was a retired Registered Nurse, caring for her retired Doctor hubby. Both were entirely sensible people, knew and understood what was coming, and planned accordingly.

There is no shame in admitting to needing, and accepting help, whether from family or hired caregivers. I watched a friend go through the back to back nursing and death of both her parents. Even with three family members and hired caregivers, along with hospice care at the end -  it still drained the family, physically and emotionally.
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« Reply #2327 on: April 30, 2021, 07:55:17 PM »

There are people who can do it and there are others who can't. I always cringe when it is called "a labor of love" as that IMO is simply unfair to those who can't.
In addition there are cases in which it is simply better to have an outside care giver, because the one cared for is reluctant to accept the help of a close loved one.
What I would very much like to see is a good discussion on this, with lot's of possibilities offered for all involved. So that the entire family gets the support they need.
Be it that the entire care is outsourced, or part of it, or when a family member decides to do all the care, that this caretaker still gets enough support to not be physically and/or emotionally drained.
Asking for help should be just as normal in any circumstances as it is nowadays in so many areas.
Remember when Mrs. Thatcher at the height of her career as the PM of GB still ran up to make a tasteful dinner for her guests, shunning help, because it was the duty of the mistress of the house? Nobody expects any woman in our society today to do this. It is not seen as unfeminine or careless.
Deciding not to take over the physical care of a severely sick person is not a sign of uncaring or heartless feelings. And we should make sure that women (and it is almost always women, even if this applies to men just as well) do not feel shamed into an extremely taxing situation, because it is "a labor of love"....
Because, even if you are not doing the entire physical care yourself, you are still the primary care giver, making all the decisions, some of which are so incredibly had, and felling all the hurt, the pain and the helplessness of watching a loved one suffer.
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Cordelia Fitzgerald

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« Reply #2328 on: April 30, 2021, 11:06:57 PM »

There are people who can do it and there are others who can't. I always cringe when it is called "a labor of love" as that IMO is simply unfair to those who can't.
In addition there are cases in which it is simply better to have an outside care giver, because the one cared for is reluctant to accept the help of a close loved one.
What I would very much like to see is a good discussion on this, with lot's of possibilities offered for all involved. So that the entire family gets the support they need.
Be it that the entire care is outsourced, or part of it, or when a family member decides to do all the care, that this caretaker still gets enough support to not be physically and/or emotionally drained.
Asking for help should be just as normal in any circumstances as it is nowadays in so many areas.
Remember when Mrs. Thatcher at the height of her career as the PM of GB still ran up to make a tasteful dinner for her guests, shunning help, because it was the duty of the mistress of the house? Nobody expects any woman in our society today to do this. It is not seen as unfeminine or careless.
Deciding not to take over the physical care of a severely sick person is not a sign of uncaring or heartless feelings. And we should make sure that women (and it is almost always women, even if this applies to men just as well) do not feel shamed into an extremely taxing situation, because it is "a labor of love"....
Because, even if you are not doing the entire physical care yourself, you are still the primary care giver, making all the decisions, some of which are so incredibly had, and felling all the hurt, the pain and the helplessness of watching a loved one suffer.

I could not agree more.  We lost my dad to complications from Parkinson's and I would not wish that on anyone.  Thankfully my mom, while still shouldering the brunt of the care, was willing to let me help.  It would have done none of us any good had she felt the need or the pressure to do it all alone. 
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #2329 on: May 01, 2021, 01:17:37 AM »

There are people who can do it and there are others who can't. I always cringe when it is called "a labor of love" as that IMO is simply unfair to those who can't.
In addition there are cases in which it is simply better to have an outside care giver, because the one cared for is reluctant to accept the help of a close loved one.
What I would very much like to see is a good discussion on this, with lot's of possibilities offered for all involved. So that the entire family gets the support they need.
Be it that the entire care is outsourced, or part of it, or when a family member decides to do all the care, that this caretaker still gets enough support to not be physically and/or emotionally drained.
Asking for help should be just as normal in any circumstances as it is nowadays in so many areas.
Remember when Mrs. Thatcher at the height of her career as the PM of GB still ran up to make a tasteful dinner for her guests, shunning help, because it was the duty of the mistress of the house? Nobody expects any woman in our society today to do this. It is not seen as unfeminine or careless.
Deciding not to take over the physical care of a severely sick person is not a sign of uncaring or heartless feelings. And we should make sure that women (and it is almost always women, even if this applies to men just as well) do not feel shamed into an extremely taxing situation, because it is "a labor of love"....
Because, even if you are not doing the entire physical care yourself, you are still the primary care giver, making all the decisions, some of which are so incredibly had, and felling all the hurt, the pain and the helplessness of watching a loved one suffer.

I could not agree more.  We lost my dad to complications from Parkinson's and I would not wish that on anyone.  Thankfully my mom, while still shouldering the brunt of the care, was willing to let me help.  It would have done none of us any good had she felt the need or the pressure to do it all alone.  

Sorry about your dad, Cordelia   Hug Iím sure that was terrible for everyone.

Excellent post Fairy.  Star Being a caregiver is rough enough without people judging you for your choice.
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Cordelia Fitzgerald

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« Reply #2330 on: May 01, 2021, 05:12:03 PM »

There are people who can do it and there are others who can't. I always cringe when it is called "a labor of love" as that IMO is simply unfair to those who can't.
In addition there are cases in which it is simply better to have an outside care giver, because the one cared for is reluctant to accept the help of a close loved one.
What I would very much like to see is a good discussion on this, with lot's of possibilities offered for all involved. So that the entire family gets the support they need.
Be it that the entire care is outsourced, or part of it, or when a family member decides to do all the care, that this caretaker still gets enough support to not be physically and/or emotionally drained.
Asking for help should be just as normal in any circumstances as it is nowadays in so many areas.
Remember when Mrs. Thatcher at the height of her career as the PM of GB still ran up to make a tasteful dinner for her guests, shunning help, because it was the duty of the mistress of the house? Nobody expects any woman in our society today to do this. It is not seen as unfeminine or careless.
Deciding not to take over the physical care of a severely sick person is not a sign of uncaring or heartless feelings. And we should make sure that women (and it is almost always women, even if this applies to men just as well) do not feel shamed into an extremely taxing situation, because it is "a labor of love"....
Because, even if you are not doing the entire physical care yourself, you are still the primary care giver, making all the decisions, some of which are so incredibly had, and felling all the hurt, the pain and the helplessness of watching a loved one suffer.

I could not agree more.  We lost my dad to complications from Parkinson's and I would not wish that on anyone.  Thankfully my mom, while still shouldering the brunt of the care, was willing to let me help.  It would have done none of us any good had she felt the need or the pressure to do it all alone.  

Sorry about your dad, Cordelia   Hug Iím sure that was terrible for everyone.

Excellent post Fairy.  Star Being a caregiver is rough enough without people judging you for your choice.

Thank you, ab!  Hug
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« Reply #2331 on: May 01, 2021, 05:25:05 PM »

'She's always been the rock of our family'

@miketindall13 praises his mum Linda as he discusses the effect Parkinson's disease has had on his dad.

He has joined forces with the Duchess of Gloucester for a video conversation to mark World Parkinson's Day.

https://twitter.com/gmb/s.../1388011707210080257?s=21

Hereís the full video. https://youtu.be/r3Zw5Ys_JhA
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minimoos

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« Reply #2332 on: May 02, 2021, 06:39:05 PM »

I always cringe when it is called "a labor of love" as that IMO is simply unfair to those who can't.
In addition there are cases in which it is simply better to have an outside care giver, because the one cared for is reluctant to accept the help of a close loved one.
What I would very much like to see is a good discussion on this, with lot's of possibilities offered for all involved. So that the entire family gets the support they need.
Be it that the entire care is outsourced, or part of it, or when a family member decides to do all the care, that this caretaker still gets enough support to not be physically and/or emotionally drained.
Asking for help should be just as normal in any circumstances as it is nowadays in so many areas.

I appreciate you saying this. My grandfather had Alzheimerís and my grandmother was reluctant to get care for him at first- and he was resistant.

I think she didnít want others to feel like she gave up on him- and I think it was also important to reassure herself she tried all other avenues before making the choice. My comments to everyone in my family at that time were that his needs had progressed beyond what any of us had the skills for. After he was in skilled nursing, she went to visit every day, and spent most of the day with him.

Part of the reason Iím so frustrated about the pandemic was she was his primary caregiver the last 5 or so years of his life. As a widow and with grown kids, she had time to be herself and not have someone else depending on her (for the first time in 70+ years!), and then we all got stuck inside.
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« Reply #2333 on: May 02, 2021, 07:21:04 PM »

'She's always been the rock of our family'

@miketindall13 praises his mum Linda as he discusses the effect Parkinson's disease has had on his dad.

He has joined forces with the Duchess of Gloucester for a video conversation to mark World Parkinson's Day.

https://twitter.com/gmb/s.../1388011707210080257?s=21

A bit of a random combination but really nice too different members of the family work together, especially when itís about something that is meaningful to them.
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« Reply #2334 on: May 15, 2021, 03:51:31 PM »

Zara is 40 today.
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« Reply #2335 on: May 15, 2021, 06:17:59 PM »

Zara is 40 today.

Well, Happy Birthday to her! 
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CathyJane

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« Reply #2336 on: May 17, 2021, 04:37:03 AM »

She looks fabulous!
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« Reply #2337 on: May 29, 2021, 08:37:07 PM »

First glimpse of little Lucas' face:

https://www.dailymail.co....as-shes-seen-newborn.html

From the little bit we get to see, I think he looks like Mike.
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #2338 on: May 29, 2021, 08:50:31 PM »

First glimpse of little Lucas' face:

https://www.dailymail.co....as-shes-seen-newborn.html

From the little bit we get to see, I think he looks like Mike.

I completely agree. Same face and head shape.
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« Reply #2339 on: May 29, 2021, 09:47:07 PM »

First glimpse of little Lucas' face:

https://www.dailymail.co....as-shes-seen-newborn.html

From the little bit we get to see, I think he looks like Mike.

Nice to see them out and about. Hopefully weíll get to see all of the kids out playing at Polo and horse events soon.
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