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Author Topic: UK - Castles & Palaces  (Read 90448 times)
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PruNordstrom

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« Reply #90 on: January 15, 2016, 06:40:05 AM »





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VIDEO: Time lapse footage shows heroic effort that saved Abergeldie Castle from floods
13 January 2016
by Andrew Clark

As the floods raged across the north-east, one of the area?s biggest concerns surrounded the future of Abergeldie Castle, with fears that the  rising River Dee could wash away the building which has stood strong since the 16th century.

The Queen?s neighbour at Balmoral, John Gordon, had to flee the castle as the raging River Dee swept away trees and a huge chunk of land at the rear of his ancient Abergeldie Castle.

When Mr Gordon looked out of his back door he saw just 5ft of dry land between him and the fearsome flood ? where before there has been 60ft of ground stretching out to the to the river bank.

Immediately work began to save the castle as the rain continued to pour, the floods continued to rise and the river continued to roar.

Press and Journal photographers Kenny Elrick and Jim Irvine positioned a camera across from the castle and captured five days of remedial work carried out by the council to shore up the foundations around the 16th century A-listed building.

Abergeldie Castle dates from the mid-16th century and was built by Sir Alexander Gordon of Midmar. Thankfully, due to, the work carried out over the last week, it looks like the building will survive long into the 21st century and beyond.

Video and more pictures at:
https://www.pressandjourn...abergeldie-castle-floods/

This does beg the question why the rock embankment wasn't installed previously to prevent the washout and undercut of the riverbank. Article doesn't write about how this emergency construction was arranged and funded.
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« Reply #91 on: January 23, 2016, 09:36:25 PM »

Update on Clandon Hall and Wentworth Woodhouse

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Why the National Trust should save Wentworth Woodhouse - and not my ancestral home

By Eleanor Doughty
9:10AM GMT 22 Jan 2016

On April 29 2015, the 8th Earl of Onslow stood in front of his former family pile, Clandon Park in Surrey, as it burned. The blaze destroyed 95 per cent of the 38,000 sq ft Palladian mansion. Now, nine months later, the National Trust has unveiled its plans to part-restore the property - which was donated to the Trust in 1956 - much to Lord Onslow's dismay. The earl told the Daily Telegraph that the organisation should use the Clandon insurance money to save Wentworth Woodhouse instead, the likely inspiration for Jane Austen?s Pemberley (Pride & Prejudice).

The sale of the Grade I listed Wentworth, the largest privately owned house in Europe, built between 1724 and 1750, was agreed with a Hong Kong fund in December but shortly afterwards the BP8  million deal fell through. For Lord Onslow, the 300-room mansion near Rotherham should be restored by the National Trust as a British tourist attraction, enterprise hub and form part of George Osborne's Northern Powerhouse. Of course, Wentworth needs work: subsidence issues require addressing, and there's the problem of how to manage, and make the best of, such a large house.

''It could have multiple-occupancy, and be part of Sheffield University, with incubation space for start-up businesses, as well as for those that are already established,'' he says. He also recommends that Wentworth copy Stowe, the National Trust property in Buckinghamshire. The building houses a school and the public pay to visit the park. ''Why should only schools like Eton and Harrow have access to these beautiful buildings'' he asks.

However, there is the not-so-small matter of the insurance payout - which is estimated to be around BP65 million. Dame Helen Ghosh, the director-general of the National Trust, and former permanent secretary to the Home Office, claims that the underwriters for Clandon won't cover an alternative purchase, and that Lord Onslow's suggestion is ''based on a misunderstanding''.

The insurance money cannot be used elsewhere because Clandon is ''inalienable'' - meaning the property can never be sold or mortgaged - she explains. But Lord Onslow, an insurance underwriter by profession, believes that an organisation as well-connected as the Trust could come to an agreement with the lender. The insurance company, Zurich, is sitting on the fence. ''We have been flexible in accommodating the needs of the National Trust, as the final decision about the future of Clandon rests on them,'' a spokesman comments. It is the insurance money that will fund the Trust's partial reconstruction of Clandon.

On Monday Dame Helen unveiled detailed plans to painstakingly restore the great Marble Hall, with its double-height ceiling, and the Speakers' Parlour, to their 18th-century state. ''We want to tell the story of the architecture,'' she says. The Trust also plans to build a modern exhibition space upstairs, and will run a competition to find the right architect for the high profile and challenging job.

The ruin that was Clandon is the result of an electrical fault in the distribution board. The fire swept through the building with unusual speed and ferocity due to high winds that day, and a disused lift shaft which acted as a wind tunnel fanning the flames. Even with 16 fire crews put to work, an estimated 90 per cent of the contents was lost, although volunteers were able to save some 400 items most precious items using what the Trust calls the ''starred list''. By lucky coincidence this drill had been rehearsed just weeks earlier in a full-scale disaster practise.

The loss at Clandon can only be estimated on account of the vast amount of rubble that is still inside. In the rooms surrounding the Marble Hall, mountains of wreckage haunt the ashy, broken space. Describing what happened on that night in April last year, Lord Onslow says: ''There were 25 windows on the back wall, each one lit with orange light. The house was alive and now, she's dead.''

Clandon had been home to the Onslows for 300 years before it was donated to the National Trust by the 5th Earl's sister Gwendolen, Countess of Iveagh, in 1956, because running costs had become too high. This might go some way to explaining why Lord Onslow doesn't want the ancestral pile to be restored. ''Clandon is lost. It's a ruin now. It decayed instantly. This sad site should be left in peace and tranquillity,'' he says. ''The last thing we want now is a replica. If the National Trust wants a replica, let them build it somewhere else.''

While Dame Helen described the fire as the opportunity for a new start, the earl views it as a chance for the Trust to reassess its goals. ''This isn't about me. It is even less about Clandon. It's about the National Trust and what they are going to do next,'' says Lord Onslow. ''It is the membership whose voice should be heard. Is this what is best for them''.

Source:
www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/property/12114344/Why-the-National-Trust-should-save-Wentworth-Woodhouse-and-not-my-ancestral-home.html

\/  Wentworth Woodhouse




\/  Clandon's Marble Hall cleared of debris after the fire


« Last Edit: January 23, 2016, 09:43:36 PM by PruNordstrom, Reason: ed » Logged

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« Reply #92 on: January 26, 2016, 04:15:54 PM »

360-degree virtual tour of some of Buck Palace's State Rooms. Amazeballs.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gen0NgJjry4
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« Reply #93 on: September 05, 2016, 04:38:36 AM »

Using this topic because the building is used for the coronation.
-----
Was wandering this site and found the maps:
www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/london-map-morgan/1682

I was comparing this map with other maps of London to see what had changed and what may be the same. Reading this map I found a church titled 'St Peter's Cathedral'.

Here's the map. Look on the upper right side next to a space labeled 'The Sanctuary'.


You can pull up a Google map and find the current area in London and the church is labelled Westminster Abbey.
I was surprised and a little confused by the name on the 1682 map.

Looking at the abbey's web site:
www.westminster-abbey.org/our-history/benedictine-monastery

''On 16 January 1540 monastic life at Westminster came to an end when Henry VIII dissolved the monastery and the deed of surrender was signed. Many of the monks retired or went into "civilian" life.  However, the Abbot became the first Dean of the new Cathedral Church founded by Henry and the Prior and several monks became clergy in the new church.  A bishop was appointed to the new see of Westminster but after ten short years the bishopric was surrendered and the Church became a Cathedral within the diocese of London.

The monks, however, were destined to return just for a short time when Queen Mary I, a Roman Catholic, restored the Benedictine Abbey under Abbot Feckenham in 1556.
...But Mary died in November 1558 and her Protestant half-sister Elizabeth I became Queen and the monks were removed.  Elizabeth established the present Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster (the Abbey's correct title) in 1560.''

Under Further reading on the page::
H.F.Westlake: Westminster Abbey. The Church, Convent, Cathedral and College of St Peter Westminster" (London, 1923). [underline is my note]

London has St Paul's Cathedral and St Peter's Cathedral. Evidently St Peter's Cathedral is the correct title for the building. When did 'St Peter's Cathedral' become known as 'Westminster Abbey' ?  Can any history buffs enlighten me?
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« Reply #94 on: April 16, 2017, 10:10:32 PM »


Foto from David Goulden Twitter account

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Arson suspected after huge fire at Grade I listed stately home in Dorset leaves 'just the walls standing'

By  Adam Boult  Fiona Parker
15 APRIL 2017  4:38PM

(Excerpt)
A 16th century mansion remodeled by a Regency architect John Nash has been destroyed by fire after a suspected arson attack. Parnham House, a Grade I listed property in Beaminster, Dorset, was home to the Strode family for 200 years.

During the Civil War, the widow of Sir John Strode, Lady Ann Strode, was killed by a Parliamentary soldier as she tried to protect Parnham. Sir John, a lawyer by profession, became a Recorder for Bridport in 1614 and MP for the borough in 1621 and 1625.

Much of the current design of the property was created by Nash, who worked on the 19th Century enlargement of Buckingham Palace, in 1810. His work on the stately home, which sits on grounds that include stone statues and topiary, can be recognised in the distinctive winding staircases and stone mullioned windows.

The mansion...was engulfed by flames in the early hours of Saturday morning. Twenty fire crews attended the blaze amid fears valuable 18th and 19th century paintings could have been destroyed or damaged.

Dorset Police said no one was injured in the blaze, which the force is treating as suspicious. Photographer Graham Hunt, who witnessed the fire, said: "From what I could tell it looks like the roof is just completely gone, just the walls left standing."

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/15/fireman-battle-huge-fire-stately-home/
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« Reply #95 on: July 06, 2017, 07:41:15 PM »

Have their been any repairs to the gardens at Birkhall since they were destroyed by floods last year?
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